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ePub Teeth (Cambridge Manuals in Archaeology) download

by Simon Hillson

ePub Teeth (Cambridge Manuals in Archaeology) download
Author:
Simon Hillson
ISBN13:
978-0521837019
ISBN:
0521837014
Language:
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press; 2 edition (September 5, 2005)
Category:
Subcategory:
Social Sciences
ePub file:
1248 kb
Fb2 file:
1334 kb
Other formats:
rtf mobi azw doc
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
587

Each book includes a survey of current archaeological practice alongside essential reference material on contemporary techniques and methodology.

Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. Simon Hillson (Author). Tell the Publisher! I'd like to read this book on Kindle.

Cambridge Manuals in Archaeology book. The range Archaeological discoveries of teeth provide remarkable information on humans, animals and the health, hygiene and diet of ancient communities.

The book's treatment of mammals is extended to include mammals of North America and Asia north of the Himalayas. The form of roots are now detailed with figures showing root socket patterns in different genera.

Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986. oceedings{Cole1987TeethB, title {Teeth. Cambridge Manuals in Archaeology. 2. 1. cm. Pp. xix + 376, 110 figs. 38 tables + 19 pls. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986. author {John L. Cole}, year {1987} }.

The book also introduces dental anatomy and the microscopic structure of. .Simon Hillson Institute of Archaeology, University College London.

With its detailed descriptions of the techniques and equipment used and its provision of tables and charts, this book is essential reading for students of archaeology, zoology and dental science. His previous publications include Teeth (Cambridge, 1986), Mammal Bones and Teeth (1992), and Dental Anthropology (Cambridge, 1996).

Teeth Cambridge Manuals in Archaeology.

Cambridge Manuals in Archaeology In mammals that grow up more slowly and live longer, replacement teeth tend to appear earlier in sequence than in fast growing mammals

Cambridge Manuals in Archaeology. How we measure 'reads'. In mammals that grow up more slowly and live longer, replacement teeth tend to appear earlier in sequence than in fast growing mammals. This trend, known as 'Schultz's Rule', is a useful tool for inferring life histories of fossil taxa.

Teeth yield remarkable information about animals as well as the health, hygiene and diet of ancient communities. In this fully revised and up-dated edition of his classic text, Simon Hillson draws together a mass of information on dental studies in archaeology and related disciplines. The book's treatment of mammals is extended to include mammals of North America and Asia north of the Himalayas. The form of roots are now detailed with figures showing root socket patterns in different genera. The new edition also includes an appendix on methods. First Edition Hb (1986): 0-521-30405-9 First Edition Pb (1990): 0-521-38671-3
  • Excellent review of teeth current and fossil. EGP

  • I am using it Palenotonlogical research and my son is using it for Archeological research. It is a valuable tool.

  • This is really a nice text book, with excellent illustrations of a wide variety of mammalian teeth. Althought it is intended for archaeologists, it will be of great use for zoologists and paleontologists. The book is divided into two parts: a first one (chapter 1) describing and figuring teeth for several mammal species; and a second one (chapters 2 to 5) on general topics such as dental tissues, criteria for age determination, variation of size and morphology in populations, etc. This second half is the best part of the book. The first one is right, but some important aspects of the morphology are not described, and there are errors in some descriptions (I have noticed that in the case of rodents). Furthermore there are important omisions (in the case of hystricognathous rodents, only the capybara is presented). Teeth of reptiles, amphibians and fishes are neither presented nor discussed. There are an important number of errata in the figures. I hope that forecoming editions of "Teeth" will solve these problems and errors and will provide more detailed descriptions of the specimens.
    After all, a good text book for archaeologists and paleontologists.