mostraligabue
» » Dependent on D.C.: The Rise of Federal Control over the Lives of Ordinary Americans

ePub Dependent on D.C.: The Rise of Federal Control over the Lives of Ordinary Americans download

by Charlotte A. Twight

ePub Dependent on D.C.: The Rise of Federal Control over the Lives of Ordinary Americans download
Author:
Charlotte A. Twight
ISBN13:
978-0312294151
ISBN:
0312294158
Language:
Publisher:
Palgrave Macmillan; Stated First Edition edition (January 12, 2002)
Category:
Subcategory:
Social Sciences
ePub file:
1894 kb
Fb2 file:
1517 kb
Other formats:
rtf lrf doc lrf
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
267

In these uncertain times, Dependent on . is the book Americans need to read when thinking about the future of their individual liberty.

In these uncertain times, Dependent on .

American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. by. Twight, Charlotte. Occidental College Library Center for the Study of the Holocaust and Genocide, Sonoma State University Point Loma Nazarene University, Ryan Library Western Sonoma County Historical Society Placer County Museums Division Cathedral City Historical Society Palo Alto Historical Association.

Dependent on DC undoubtedly will pull you in merely by the title. The most frightening is her description of the rise of federal data collection

Dependent on DC undoubtedly will pull you in merely by the title. Charlotte Twight chronicles the gradual evolution of growing government and eventual control. The most frightening is her description of the rise of federal data collection. The bottom line is Big Brother is watching, he knows where you are and he can come get you anytime he wants because it's basically impossible for you to know all the laws much less abide by them. Ms. Twight details how politicians and bureaucrats lie, cheat and steal to accomplish the ultimate goal of getting and holding power.

Charlotte Twight has written an excellent book to help Americans understand how the federal government is insidiously seizing control of their lives, year by year, edict by edict, emergency by emergency. Twight provides both a solid theoretical framework and bevies of examples to drive home the danger from Washington. A professor of economics at Boise State University, she highlights how, "from the perspective of individual liberty," the "authority to control, not the specific controls imposed at a particular point in time," is the key issue.

Wow! Charlotte Twight's book, "Dependent on DC" is clearly one of the best "scientific" political polemics I have ever read

Wow! Charlotte Twight's book, "Dependent on DC" is clearly one of the best "scientific" political polemics I have ever read. the naysayers and adversaries of increased government at all levels, thereby making it difficult (if not impossible) for ited government to survive. This book is both a serious academic work which should appeal to scholars and academics, as well as a political polemic designed for ted readers interested in the dynamics of public policy formation. Once I picked it up, I.

Charlotte Twight, economist and attorney, is professor of economics at Boise State University. Professor Twight discussed her book,, published by Palgrave. According to her, the shift from personal autonom. harlotte Twight.

What are reading intentions? Setting up reading intentions help you organise your course reading. It makes it easy to scan through your lists and keep track of progress. Here's an example of what they look like: Your reading intentions are also stored in your profile for future reference. How do I set a reading intention.

The Rise of Federal Control over the Lives of Ordinary Americans. Twight does a good job debunking the idea that the welfare megastate we now have is the result of popular desires rationally translated into policy, as all too many naive academics would have it. The question is, Where do we go from here? On this point, the book is less than satisfactory. Twight takes the position that in its original form the . government was a durable, healthy arrangement and that our aim should be to claw our way back to that starting point.

Journal of American Studies. Volume 37, Issue 3. December 2003, pp. 520-521. Charlotte A. Twight, Dependent on DC: The Rise of Federal Control over the Lives of Ordinary Americans (New York: Palgrave, 2002, £20). Pp. 422. ISBN 0 312 29415 8. M. J. HEALE (a1). Lancaster University.

Dependent on D.C. is a compelling new book that raises serious questions about the future of liberty in America. Charlotte A. Twight proves beyond doubt that the growth of dependence on government in the past seventy years has not been accidental, that its creation has been bipartisan, and that it is accelerating. She reveals a universal tactic used by federal officials to expand government authority over the lives of all Americans and exposes the many forms this tactic has taken. Twight shows how growing federal power--driven by legislation, validated by Supreme Court decisions, and accelerated by presidential ambition--has eroded the rule of law in our nation, leaving almost no activity that the central government cannot at its discretion regulate, manipulate, or prohibit. A constitutional counterrevolution has occurred in America--one so profound that few today can imagine Americans free of dependence on government. Dependent on D.C. shows why Americans have not resisted this expansion of federal power and reveals the daunting magnitude of the changes needed to reverse our nation's spiral into dependency. In these uncertain times, Dependent on D.C. is the book Americans need to read when thinking about the future of their individual liberty in a country long committed to the ideal of personal freedom.
  • It has been said that if you were to put a frog into a pot of boiling water the frog would do it's best to escape, but that if you put the frog into tepid water and gradually heat the water to the boiling point the frog would just sit there until it dies. Never having boiled frogs I don't know whether or not that's true. But, it's a central premise of Charlotte Twight's book that if we were frogs, the government has us in the pot and has gradually brought the water to a point close to boiling.
    Ms. Twight details how that happened with several examples including Social Security, federal income tax witholding, health care and education. The most frightening is her description of the rise of federal data collection. The bottom line is Big Brother is watching, he knows where you are and he can come get you anytime he wants because it's basically impossible for you to know all the laws much less abide by them.
    Ms. Twight details how politicians and bureaucrats lie, cheat and steal to accomplish the ultimate goal of getting and holding power. She is more polite though and calls it political transaction cost manipulation.
    I have only two complaints about the book. The first is that Ms. Twight fails to take into account the full force of government's fellow travelors in the media and special interest groups (ranging from labor unions to recipients of corporate welfare) and their impact on the growth of government. The second is that she doesn't do enough to put the evolution of America's government into a complete historical and philosophical context.
    Nevertheless, this is a book well worth reading. If you were to read it in conjunction with "The Myth of the Robber Barons," "Bias" and "America's Thirty Years War" you would have a more complete picture of what is really going on.
    But, whatever you do, read this book. It's worth the effort.

  • Dependent on DC undoubtedly will pull you in merely by the title.
    Charlotte Twight chronicles the gradual evolution of growing government and eventual control.
    Critics may claim she relies on fear tactics that border on conspiracy-mongering paranoia. Instead, what she really does is trace the roots of growing government control to FDR's New Deal Legislation which pushed the government-control model down the hill. It has picked up speed ever since.
    During my lifespan, a mentality has existed that if something should be done about a social or societal problem, government will be the perfect solution. Twight shows otherwise. Instead, she points out how growing government control has hurt a nation that once prided itself on self-reliance and strength. Now, our states, cities, and people hold their hand out to the Federal Government like a spoiled kid does to their parents. Like a spoiled child, we have become part of the problem.
    Twight shows how best intentions have gone awry in a government wanting to help and cure all societal ills ... and the battle for it.
    Did you know the idea of Federal Withholding did not start until 1943? And that it was supposed to be temporary? Can you imagine how this nation would work if every American had to find the self-discipline to withhold 15 per cent of their income on their own? How would the government spend your money if we did?
    Or what about social security. How much more could a company pay you, or how many more workers could they hire if they did not have to pay into a bankrupt system?
    Read how the American people have abdicated responsiblity, reliance, and resilience ... thinking almighty government will solve their problems. Unfortunately, government has become the problem.

  • Dependent on D.C.: the Rise of Federal Control over the Lives of Ordinary Americans.(Book Review): An article from: Independent Review This book is absorbing because it approaches a challenging subject with depth and candor. Charlotte Twight writes with documented facts and with a serious questioning mind.

    Chapter two is especially rich in information. Here, Twight delves into the meat of her theories. She defines the subtle nature of political transactional-cost manipulation as opposed to simple transactional costs. In the American political realm there are almost unlimited opportunities for governmental officials to manipulate costs (such as in the "fog factor" and "tectonic strategies") in order to control the outcome of policy decisions.

    This part of the book is academically intense but I appreciated the fact that she provides a wealth of references for further reading and illustration. Her conclusions are thoroughly documented and explained. By the time she arrives at "contrived political transactional costs" her point is already clear and obvious.

    It is clear that our societal woes and pains are often the direct result of an imposing and self serving almighty Federal System. This is an intimidating force that we should not be afraid to criticize. It is through constructive criticism such as Twight's that matters can be improved.

    I find it well worth buying and reading and would recommend it to any reader concerned with issues vital to all Americans.

  • The book tracks the rise of Progressivism through changes in public understanding of the Constitution through Legislative action and a few really bad Supreme Court decisions. It powerfully portrays the way Congress and the President make it very difficult for citizens to understand what is going on, and never never leaves citizens enough time to respond. We now have to pass the bill in order to read it, even for the legislators themselves. The book is disheartening in that its portrayal of the system development demonstrates overwhelming obstacles in the way of any substantial reform. However we need to know these things if we are to save the Republic.