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ePub Limits of Law, Prerogatives of Power: Interventionism after Kosovo download

by M. Glennon

ePub Limits of Law, Prerogatives of Power: Interventionism after Kosovo download
Author:
M. Glennon
ISBN13:
978-1403963666
ISBN:
1403963665
Language:
Publisher:
Palgrave Macmillan; 2001 edition (May 2, 2003)
Category:
Subcategory:
Social Sciences
ePub file:
1946 kb
Fb2 file:
1442 kb
Other formats:
lit mbr docx azw
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
246

Interventionism after Kosovo. NATO's bombing of Yugoslavia was justified.

Interventionism after Kosovo. price for USA in USD (gross). NATO violated the United Nations Charter - but nations have used armed force so often that the ban on non-defensive use of force has been cast into doubt. Yet nations remain hopelessly divided on what the rules should be.

Michael J. Glennon is Professor of International Law at Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University. From 1977 to 1980 he was Legal Counsel to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. This item: Limits of Law, Prerogatives of Power: Interventionism after Kosovo. Customers who bought this item also bought.

In Kosovo, direct military targets became more vulnerable as the weather improved and NATO pilots learned the lay of the land.

But an enormous gap in values-most noticeably concerning armed intervention-has prevented that from happening

But an enormous gap in values-most noticeably concerning armed intervention-has prevented that from happening. One group of nations continues to cling to the United Nations Charter's ban against intervention, while another group-led by NATO and the UN Security Council itself-openly violates that prohibition. In fact, the ban has been breached so often that it can no longer be regarded as authoritative

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Michael Glennon's recent work is the best book written on international law and the use of force in the past 40 years. While this may seem to be a bold statement, I make it for three reasons

Michael Glennon's recent work is the best book written on international law and the use of force in the past 40 years. While this may seem to be a bold statement, I make it for three reasons. First, Glennon's conception of international law that forms the basis of his analysis reflects an accurate understanding of the nature of the international system and the realities of international relations. Second, his analytical method reveals the dynamics of how states constitute rules of international law. Third, he offers a realistic conclusion about the current, woeful status of the law,.

Bibliographic Details. Title: [(Limits of Law, Prerogatives of Power:. Publisher: Palgrave MacMillan Publication Date: 2004 Binding: Paperback Book Condition: Good

Bibliographic Details. Publisher: Palgrave MacMillan Publication Date: 2004 Binding: Paperback Book Condition: Good. AbeBooks offers millions of new, used, rare and out-of-print books, as well as cheap textbooks from thousands of booksellers around the world.

International Organization 53 (2):379-408. Legitimacy, Power, and the Symbolic Life of the UN Security Council. Global Gover- nance 8 (1):35-51.

Limits of Law, Prerogatives of Power: Intervention After Kosovo. Why the Security Council Failed. International Organization 53 (2):379-408. Stayin' Alive: The Rumours of the UN's Death Have Been Exaggerated: Too Legit to Quit. Foreign Affairs 82 (4):204-5. Princeton University Press. Jakobsen, Peter Viggo. The Transformation of United Nations Peace Operations in the 1990s.

NATO's bombing of Yugoslavia was justified. NATO violated the United Nations Charter - but nations have used armed force so often that the ban on non-defensive use of force has been cast into doubt. Dangerous cracks in the international legal order have surfaced - widened, ironically, by the UN Security Council itself, which has ridden roughshod over the Charter's ban on intervention. Yet nations remain hopelessly divided on what the rules should be. An unplanned geopolitical order has thus emerged - posing serious dilemmas for American policy-makers in a world where intervention will be judged more by wisdom than by law.