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ePub Military Capacity and the Risk of War: China, India, Pakistan and Iran (SIPRI Monograph Series) download

by Eric Arnett

ePub Military Capacity and the Risk of War: China, India, Pakistan and Iran (SIPRI Monograph Series) download
Author:
Eric Arnett
ISBN13:
978-0198292814
ISBN:
0198292813
Language:
Publisher:
Stockholm International Peace Research Institute; 1 edition (June 19, 1997)
Category:
Subcategory:
Social Sciences
ePub file:
1587 kb
Fb2 file:
1346 kb
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
944

Beyond threat perception: assessing military capacity and reducing the risk of war in southern Asia Eric Arnett

Beyond threat perception: assessing military capacity and reducing the risk of war in southern Asia Eric Arnett. 2. Threat perception and military planning in China: domestic instability and the importance of prestige Di Hua Appendix 2A. Russian weapons and military technologies of interest to the PLA Di Hua. 3. Military technology and doctrine in Chinese military planning: compensating for obsolescence Paul H. B. Godwin.

And when might military technology itself become a cause ofconflict? Eric Arnett addresses these questions . The author identifies specific technologies and perceptions that raise the risk of war in credible scenarios of conflict.

And when might military technology itself become a cause ofconflict? Eric Arnett addresses these questions in the context of four particularly important Asian states from the perspectives of regional specialists and experts in technology and military affairs.

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And when might military techlogy itself become a cause of conflict? Eric Arnett addresses these questions in. .The author identifies specific techlogies and perceptions that raise the risk of war in credible scenarios of conflict.

And when might military techlogy itself become a cause of conflict? Eric Arnett addresses these questions in the context of four particularly important Asian states from the perspectives of regional specialists and experts in techlogy and military affairs. The author identifies specific techlogies and perceptions that raise the risk.

Book Binding:Hardback.

Military Capacity and the Risk of Wa: China, India, Pakistan and Iran (SIPRI Monographs). Book Binding:Hardback. World of Books Ltd was founded in 2005, recycling books sold to us through charities either directly or indirectly. Read full description. See details and exclusions. See all 2 pre-owned listings.

Results from Google Books. Indo-Pakistani War of 1965. Disambiguation notice.

India, Pakistan, and the great powers. The India–Pakistan rivalry remains one of the most enduring and unresolved conflicts of our times. Rivalries in the absence of territorial issues tend to go to war only by being embroiled in an ongoing war by a third party. Begun in the aftermath of the birth of the two states from British colonial rule in 1947, it has continued for well over half a century with periodic wars and crises erupting between the two rivals. A series of tests with emphasis on rivalries between major states occurring during 1816-1986 supports the territorial explanation.

The military history of Pakistan (Urdu: تاريخ عسكری پاكِستان‎) encompasses an immense panorama of conflicts and struggles extending for more than 2,000 years across areas constituting modern Pakistan and greater South Asia. The history of the modern-day military of Pakistan began in 1947, when Pakistan achieved its independence as a modern nation

India and Pakistan have fought four wars since their birth, following the . India-Pakistan's Military Strategy and the Role of Jihadist Proxies.

India and Pakistan have fought four wars since their birth, following the partition of British India in 1947. These wars, fought in 1947, 1965, 1971 (which resulted in the loss of East Pakistan and the birth of the new state of Bangladesh) and 1999, all resulted in significant Indian victories.

When does the legitimate application of military technology to the problem of national defense become needlessly provocative? What obstacles must developing countries overcome if they hope to use military technology effectively? And when might military technology itself become a cause of conflict? Eric Arnett addresses these questions in the context of four important Asian states from the perspectives of regional specialists and experts in technology and military affairs.