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ePub Girls Under the Umbrella of Autism Spectrum Disorders: Practical Solutions for Addressing Everyday Challenges download

by Lori Ernsperger

ePub Girls Under the Umbrella of Autism Spectrum Disorders: Practical Solutions for Addressing Everyday Challenges download
Author:
Lori Ernsperger
ISBN13:
978-1931282475
ISBN:
1931282471
Language:
Publisher:
Autism Asperger Pub Co; 1 edition (August 31, 2007)
Category:
Subcategory:
Social Sciences
ePub file:
1642 kb
Fb2 file:
1474 kb
Other formats:
lrf lit mbr rtf
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
639

LORI ERNSPERGER, P. What a refreshing perspective this book offers by focusing on girls under the autism spectrum.

LORI ERNSPERGER, P.

Author Dr. Lori Ernsperger, an autism and behavioral specialist, provides the issues and strategies information while . Lori Ernsperger, an autism and behavioral specialist, provides the issues and strategies information while mother Danielle Wendell gives us the important parent perspective and what parents experience on the life journey of raising a daughter. The ratio of boys to girls with ASD is 4:1; it is as high as 10:1 for Asperger Syndrome.

Girls symptoms present differently than girls, and this book shows behaviors to look for in girls. I wish I had read this book bac This is an excellent resource for parents of girls on the Autism Spectrum, especially those who knew something was different about their child and had a hard time getting a diagnosis. Parents don't necessarily want to hear that their daughter has ASD but the diagnosis will hopefully get the help they need at school and after. It is also a great resource for teachers

This book helps to nurture and develop their gifts and talents. 2 people like this topic.

This book helps to nurture and develop their gifts and talents.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Girls Under the Umbrella of Autism Spectrum . Lori Ernsperger, PhD, has more than twenty years of experience working in the public schools as a teacher, administrator, and behavioral consultant.

Lori Ernsperger, PhD, has more than twenty years of experience working in the public schools as a teacher, administrator, and behavioral consultant.

Same Every Day Low Prices. No membership fee. You’ll lose NextDay delivery if your cart contains one or more items not labeled NextDay eligible. This book helps to nurture and develop their gifts and talents. Autism Asperger Publishing Company, Aapc Publishing.

book by Lori Ernsperger

book by Lori Ernsperger.

Lori Ernsperger, Danielle Wendel

Lori Ernsperger, Danielle Wendel.

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Co-authored by an experienced professional and a mother of a young girl on the autism spectrum, this much-awaited book combines the best of both worlds as it gives a voice to girls under the umbrella of autism spectrum disorders. The authors provide insightful first-hand accounts of girls lives along with research-based strategies and practical techniques for addressing the unique needs of girls on the spectrum while nurturing and developing their gifts and talents. Throughout each chapter, you will find descriptions of interventions and strategies designed to improve specific behaviors at home, at school, and in the community. Throughout, the emphasis is on what sets girls apart from boys on the spectrum in an effort to ensure that their unique needs are met and their special talents are fostered and nurtured.
  • My 9 year old daughter has recently been diagnosed with PDD. I knew "something" was wrong but never had a name for what it was. Her diagnosis has finally told me where we are in the world of disabilities and this book is like a map. It has given me suggestions on how to manage behaviors, suggestions for IEPs and even potential therapy goals. I would recommend this book to anyone with a daughter in the spectrum.

  • As described

  • This is a book that is well written and explains in layman's terms what to expect when you have a daughter that has been diagnosed with ASD disorder.

  • Girls growing up on the spectrum is a much more thorough book. Book didn't provide any solutions I hadn't already read before.

  • What a refreshing perspective this book offers by focusing on girls under the autism spectrum. I found it fascinating and shocking while reading this book to discover that their may be a vast number of undiagnosed girls flying under the proverbial radar due to how society views gender differences which could affect whether or not a girl is diagnosed with autism versus being viewed as shy and/or eccentric. This book does many things including discussing that "the underdiagnosing of girls with ASD is due to our reliance on male prototype of autism, whereby diagnosis is based on behaviors that are more extreme in how they present themselves to the clinician or educator."

    In addition to the interesting topic of gender difference in ASD and how it presents, this book is a "scrapbook" or journal of personal journeys from the perspective of young and young at heart ladies on the autism spectrum...the challenges they have faced, their hurdles and successes. It brings a unique insight into the world of autism from a girl's point of view.

    The book is also a great resource including an appendix full of suggestions, checklists, plans, resources, etc. to help parents help their daughters navigate through the world of IEPs, advocacy and social skills. An even more important resource comes from the women who are advocating for these young ladies and are living examples to what those with autism can do with their life and suggestions on how to succeed...for example from Temple Grandin and Zosia Zaks.

    I would highly suggest this book for a parent with a daughter who has been diagnosed with autism and/or a young lady who would like to further understand her autism. Also, teachers and para-professionals would learn a LOT from this book and it's a quick read full of information.

    The "icing on the cake" was the wonderful painting and poem by Amanda, a fine young lady with autism.

  • I was quite eager to read this book, as there is so little written about girls with autism. And perhaps that's the key word---autism. This book seems to be aimed at girls with Aspergers or if not that, very high functioning autism. I'm based that on many things---a casual statement that most girls with ASD are verbal (and no discussion of the girls that aren't), the chapter on college, with no similar chapter on what happens after school to girls that aren't going to college and a bright cheery statement on page 208 "The future for girls with ASD is unlimited and boundless" Well, we can hope that, but I really don't think that's a statement that applies to ALL girls with ASD. What about the considerable percentage of autistic girls who are also retarded (to use the blunt term I prefer) such as my daughter?

    I tried to then judge the book based on what I think it really was---a book about the high end of the spectrum for girls with ASD. Even there, I would not say it really stands out from the many other general books of this type. There's a bit of a chapter about dating and hygenie, but the advice is rather non-specific. I've been thinking about how I will help my daughter with issues like her period, if she has no idea what is going on---things like that weren't addressed here. The advice on toilet training, IEP meetings, food issues---all fairly sound if not in depth, but none are issues not covered in other books.

    I also looked in vain for information about studies of girls with autism and how it differs than autism in boys. I've read here and there how although there are less girls with classic autism, it is often more severe in girls. I wanted the author's take on that, and on how classic autism might show itself differently in the early years in girls. The latter was addressed mainly in statements along the lines of how autism in girls might be missed until they are in elementary school, because the girls have such good verbal skills. Well, what if they don't?

    The personal accounts scattered here and there were interesting, but once again, obviously written by very literate and bright women. I guess ASD is a huge umbrella, and perhaps I am way off near one edge with my daughter, and felt a little rained on by this book. However, if you have a bright, verbal girl with mild autism or with Aspergers, this book might be helpful. Otherwise, I'd wait for a book for the rest of us.