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ePub Introduction To Marx And Engels: A Critical Reconstruction (Dimensions of Philosophy) download

by Richard Schmitt

ePub Introduction To Marx And Engels: A Critical Reconstruction (Dimensions of Philosophy) download
Author:
Richard Schmitt
ISBN13:
978-0813304267
ISBN:
0813304261
Language:
Publisher:
Westview Press; 1 edition (August 20, 1987)
Category:
Subcategory:
Social Sciences
ePub file:
1486 kb
Fb2 file:
1330 kb
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
246

Richard Schmitt is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at Brown University

Richard Schmitt is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at Brown University. He now teaches at Assumption, Becker and Worcester State Colleges as an adjunct. Born in Germany, of Jewish parentage, he arrived in the United States in 1946. One person found this helpful.

Richard Schmitt argues that Marxian predictions are ambiguous and . Richard Schmitt is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at Brown University. Best known for his introductory texts to Heidegger and to Marx and Engels, he has written widely about existentialism and political philosophy.

Richard Schmitt argues that Marxian predictions are ambiguous and unreliable, adding that the political program is vitiated by serious ambiguities in the conceptions of class and of political and social transformations.

Start by marking Introduction to Marx and Engels: A Critical Reconstruction as Want to Read .

Start by marking Introduction to Marx and Engels: A Critical Reconstruction as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. This book steers a middle path between those who argue that the theories of Marx and Engels have been rendered obsolete by historical events and those who reply that these theories emerge untouched from the political changes of the last ten years. Marxism has been a theory of historical change that claimed to be able to predict with considerable accuracy how existing instit.

Richard Schmitt - 1989 - International Phenomenological Society. Introduction to Marx and Engels: A Critical Reconstruction. Fallacy or Truth?-A Reaction to Censure

Richard Schmitt - 1989 - International Phenomenological Society. Fallacy or Truth?-A Reaction to Censure. Zhong-hua He - 2008 - Modern Philosophy 3:22-28. The Bourgeois Epoch Marx and Engels on Britain, France, and Germany. Richard F. Hamilton - 1991. The Political Ideas of Marx and Engels. Richard N. Hunt - 1975.

As a philosopher, Marx created and characterized a stem of philosophy called " dialectical materialism . .A case study of leftist terrorism and its prevention in turkey: dhkp/C.

J THE HISTORICAL MATERIALISM DEBATE S. H. Rigby, Marxism and History: a Critical Introduction, Manchester, Manchester University Press, 1987, 314pp. Cooley, Neil Duxbury, Nigel Ambrose, Noel Parker, Paul Bagguley, Paul Q. Hirst, Philosophy: Its History and Historiography, R. W. Connell, Rationality and Revolution, Richard Montgomery, Richard Norman, Richard Schmitt, S. Rigby, Sartre and 'Les Temps Modernes', Sean Sayers, Seyla Benhabib, Shaun Richards, Social Theory Today, socialism, Stuart Sim, Terry Eagleton, The End of the State, The Shadow of the Object

Richard Schmitt argues that Marxian predictions are ambiguous and unreliable, adding . Dimensions of Philosophy. Routledge, Taylor and Francis. We must understand such criticisms if we are to understand our own world and live in it effectively.

This book steers a middle path between those who argue that the theories of Marx and Engels have been rendered obsolete by historical events and those who reply that these theories emerge untouched from the political changes of the last ten years.Marxism has been a theory of historical change that claimed to be able to predict with considerable accuracy how existing institutions were going to change. Marxism has also been a political program designed to show how these inevitable changes could be hastened. Richard Schmitt argues that Marxian predictions are ambiguous and unreliable, adding that the political program is vitiated by serious ambiguities in the conceptions of class and of political and social transformations. Marxism remains of importance, however, because it is the major source of criticisms of capitalism and its associated social and political institutions. We must understand such criticisms if we are to understand our own world and live in it effectively. While very critical of the failures of Marx and Engels, this book offers a sympathetic account of their criticism of capitalism and their visions of a better world, mentions some interpretive controversies, and connects the questions raised by Marx and Engels to contemporary disputes to show continuity between social thought in the middle of the last century and today.Addressed to undergraduate students, the book is easily accessible. It will be important in introductory or middle-level courses in sociology, political theory, critical theory of literature or law. It will also be useful in graduate courses in political theory, sociology, and economics.
  • This book is a great way to get clear on the voluminous thought of Marx and Engels. Each short chapter covers a topic from Marxist theory, outlining Marx's (and sometimes Engels's) views, the arguments supporting them, and the major interpretations of Marx that have been in vogue for the past century and a half. The added bonus is that Schmitt evaluates the arguments and the plausibility of Marx's theses, giving the reader an idea of which ideas still ring true and which ideas should be consigned to the dustbin of history.

    The explanations are fairly clear, which is of fundamental importance in such a book. Schmitt argues compellingly that many Marxist ideas are still very relevant today without insisting that we accept some of Marx's less credible predictions. While Schmitt's views are welcome and make the book more engaging, I did get the feeling that Schmitt did not do justice to arguments on the other side. However, overall, the bias and arguments for it are transparent, so I respect it.

    The one problem I had with this book is that I felt that it started to drag in the latter half. The opening chapters are pretty tight and cover some interesting questions. The final chapters seem to get a bit repetitive and long. Perhaps this is because, given some of Marx's core doctrines, the rest is fairly obvious. In any event, this is still a great introduction to Marx, and it's well worth getting familiar with Marx, both for his valid critiques of capitalism and to understand the ideas, the application and misapplication of which have shaped much of global politics during the 20th century.

  • I have been trying to get an understanding of Marx/Engels that I could be comfortable with for years. This is it! Written without having to excise Lenin/Stalin/Trotsky/Mao to understand it. Mr. Schmitt is right-on with his very readable description of the nature of bourgeois hegemony of political power within the modern state.

    He is very honest with the reader about where he thinks the holes are in Marx's theories. This should be required reading for anyone on the "Left", as well as for any young person attempting to understand how our society really works.

  • Too often Marx and Engels are reduced to philosophical caricatures in order to serve an author's own agenda. Richard Schmitt's book is noteworth for his careful analysis of the enduring issues and insights of Marx and Engels. I enjoyed this refreshing reminder of what all the fuss was about.