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ePub Malnourished Children: An Economic Approach to the Causes and Consequences in Rural Thailand (Papers of the East-West Population Institute) download

by Sirilaksana Chutikul

ePub Malnourished Children: An Economic Approach to the Causes and Consequences in Rural Thailand (Papers of the East-West Population Institute) download
Author:
Sirilaksana Chutikul
ISBN13:
978-0866380850
ISBN:
086638085X
Language:
Publisher:
East-West Population Inst (December 1, 1986)
Category:
Subcategory:
Social Sciences
ePub file:
1397 kb
Fb2 file:
1468 kb
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4.3
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166

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by Sirilaksana Chutikul. ISBN 13: 9780866380850. Publication Date: 12/1/1986.

Chutikul, S. (1986) Malnourished Children: An Economic Approach to the Causes and Consequences in Rural . Predictors of the number of under-five malnourished children in Bangladesh: application of the generalized poisson regression model. BMC Public Health, Vol. 13, Issue. (1986) Malnourished Children: An Economic Approach to the Causes and Consequences in Rural Thailand. Technical Report 102, East-West Center, Honolulu.

Impaired performance of malnourished people subsequently constraints the economic development.

the period 2010-2012 show one eighth of the worlds population to be undernourished, out of which 98% inhabit the developing countries (FAO 2015), particularly the Asian region (UNSCN 2010). Globally, 16% of all children less than five years of age were estimated to be underweight in the year 2011, the highest prevalence being in South Asia. Impaired performance of malnourished people subsequently constraints the economic development.

Demographic and social factors affecting infant mortality in rural northern . Papers of the East-West Population Institute, No. 5. oogle Scholar. In Richard A. Easterlin (e., Population and Economic Change in Developing Countries. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Demographic and social factors affecting infant mortality in rural northern Thailand are examined using log-linear modifiedmultiple regression models and data drawn from a representative sample o. . MacMahon, Brian, Mary Grace Kovar, and Jacob J. Feldman. Infant Mortality Rates: Socioeconomic Factors. Puffer, R. R. and C. V. Serrano.

The East Asia/Pacific and CEE/CIS regions have made the greatest progress in reducing .

The East Asia/Pacific and CEE/CIS regions have made the greatest progress in reducing underweight prevalence, and 58 countries are on track to reach the MDG target. Yet, 143 million under-fives in the developing world continue to suffer from malnutrition, more than half of them in South Asia. Economic growth of 9% can not guarantee good health to the citizens if the state do not take pains to redistribute wealth properly to make India a safer place for its children to grow with dignity.

The State of World Rural Poverty: An Inquiry into Its Causes and Consequences. New York: University Press.

Disparities between rural and urban areas is on the rise, particularly in many developing and transitional countries. Globally, rural people and rural places tend to be disadvantaged relative to their urban counterparts and poverty rates increase as rural areas become. There are also far more malnourished children in rural areas of Africa than in urban areas. The State of World Rural Poverty: An Inquiry into Its Causes and Consequences.

Scott Drimie Integrated Rural & Regional Development Human Sciences . 4. Underlying causes of HIV/AIDS.

The devastation caused by HIV/AIDS is unique because it is depriving families, communities and entire nations of their young and most productive people. According to the Southern African Migration Project (SAMP), the reasons why the highest rates of infection in the world occur in Southern Africa and other African regions are unclear.

Paper prepared as background for the 2007 Health, Nutrition and Population (HNP) Sector Strategy. Disclaimer: The findings, interpretations and conclusions expressed in the paper are entirely those of the authors, and do not represent the views of the World Bank, its Executive Directors, or the countries they represent.