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ePub Negative Liberty: Public Opinion and the Terrorist Attacks on America download

by Darren W. Davis

ePub Negative Liberty: Public Opinion and the Terrorist Attacks on America download
Author:
Darren W. Davis
ISBN13:
978-0871543226
ISBN:
0871543222
Language:
Publisher:
Russell Sage Foundation; Annotated edition edition (March 2, 2007)
Category:
Subcategory:
Social Sciences
ePub file:
1535 kb
Fb2 file:
1706 kb
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
591

In Negative Liberty, Darren Davis grabs a unique opportunity to gauge American attitudes in the wake of an attack that many people thought might be the harbinger of continued assaults on the United States.

In Negative Liberty, Darren Davis grabs a unique opportunity to gauge American attitudes in the wake of an attack that many people thought might be the harbinger of continued assaults on the United States. America would then join the ranks of other contemporary democracies that had to consider curtailing civil liberties to preserve security. Just how would Americans react? Drawing on a rich theoretical background, Davis constructs a variety of instruments and models to survey American attitudes.

Political scientist Darren Davis challenges this conventional wisdom in Negative Liberty, revealing a surprising story of how September 11 affected Americans' views on civil liberties and security.

Public Opinion and the Terrorist Attacks on America. Davis gives us a mass of empirical material: many national surveys of citizens’ attitudes in the aggregate over time; his own three-stage panel time-series analysis that enables him to track how each individual’s perceptions and preferences changed; and experiments in which he presents individuals with arguments and counterarguments to discover which ones are persuasive.

Did America s democratic convictions change forever after the terrorist attacks of September 11?

Did America s democratic convictions change forever after the terrorist attacks of September 11? In the wake of 9/11, many pundits predicted that Americans new and profound anxiety would usher in an era of political acquiescence. Fear, it was claimed, would drive the public to rally around the president and tolerate diminished civil liberties in exchange for security.

His other book, Negative Liberty: Public Opinion and the Terrorist Attacks on America, examines the role of threat perceptions on the tradeoffs between civil liberties and security, political tolerance, and ideas of citizenship.

Negative Liberty: Public Opinion and the Terrorist Attacks on America. Gamson, William A. 1979. The Dissent of the Governed: Alienation and Democracy in America. New York: Russell Sage Foundation. Davis, Darren . and Brian D. Silver. Civil Liberties vs. Security: Public Opinion in the Context of the Terrorist Attacks on America. American Journal of Political Science 48 (1): 28–46. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Della Porta, Donatella, and Herbert Reiter. American Journal of Sociology 85 (1): 187–89.

Darren W. Davis; Brian D. Silver American Journal of Political Science, Vol. 48, No. 1. (Ja. 2004), pp. 28-46. CO%3B2-J American Journal of Political Science is currently published by Midwest Political Science Association. Davis is Associate Professor of Political Science, Michigan State . Civil Liberties Trade-Offs

Darren W. Davis is Associate Professor of Political Science, Michigan State University, 303 S. Kedzie Hall, East Lansing, MI 48824-1032 ([email protected] For their financial support of the Attack on America, Civil Liberties Trade-offs, and Ethnic Tolerance survey, we are grateful to the National Science Foundation (SES-0140541) and the College of Social Science at Michigan State University. Civil Liberties Trade-Offs. America’s response to the terrorist attacks reveals a con-testability of rights (Sniderman et al. 1996) in which the commitment to civil liberties collides with other cher-ished values.

For their financial support of the Attack on America, Civil Liberties Trade-offs, and Ethnic Tolerance survey, we are grateful to the National Science Foundation (SES-0140541) and the College of Social Science at Michigan State University.

Did America’s democratic convictions “change forever” after the terrorist attacks of September 11? In the wake of 9/11, many pundits predicted that Americans’ new and profound anxiety would usher in an era of political acquiescence. Fear, it was claimed, would drive the public to rally around the president and tolerate diminished civil liberties in exchange for security. Political scientist Darren Davis challenges this conventional wisdom in Negative Liberty, revealing a surprising story of how September 11 affected Americans’ views on civil liberties and security.

Drawing on a unique series of original public opinion surveys conducted in the immediate aftermath of 9/11 and over the subsequent three years, Negative Liberty documents the rapid shifts in Americans’ opinions regarding the tradeoff between liberty and security, at a time when the threat of terrorism made the conflict between these values particularly stark. Theories on the psychology of threat predicted that people would cope with threats by focusing on survival and reaffirming their loyalty to their communities, and indeed, Davis found that Americans were initially supportive of government efforts to prevent terrorist attacks by rolling back certain civil liberties. Democrats and independents under a heightened sense of threat became more conservative after 9/11, and trust in government reached its highest level since the Kennedy administration. But while ideological divisions were initially muted, this silence did not represent capitulation on the part of civil libertarians. Subsequent surveys in the years after the attacks revealed that, while citizens’ perceptions of threat remained acute, trust in the government declined dramatically in response to the perceived failures of the administration’s foreign and domestic security policies. Indeed, those Americans who reported the greatest anxiety about terrorism were the most likely to lose confidence in the government in the years after 2001. As a result, ideological unity proved short lived, and support for civil liberties revived among the public. Negative Liberty demonstrates that, in the absence of faith in government, even extreme threats to national security are not enough to persuade Americans to concede their civil liberties permanently.

The September 11 attacks created an unprecedented conflict between liberty and security, testing Americans’ devotion to democratic norms. Through lucid analysis of concrete survey data, Negative Liberty sheds light on how citizens of a democracy balance these competing values in a time of crisis.