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ePub Spoken and Written Language: Exploring Orality and Literacy (Advances in Discourse Processes) download

by Deborah Tannen

ePub Spoken and Written Language: Exploring Orality and Literacy (Advances in Discourse Processes) download
Author:
Deborah Tannen
ISBN13:
978-0893910990
ISBN:
0893910996
Language:
Publisher:
Praeger (January 1, 1982)
Category:
Subcategory:
Words Language & Grammar
ePub file:
1252 kb
Fb2 file:
1777 kb
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4.5
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737

The authors of these collected papers demonstrate that complexities found in discourse in context reflect not only its spoken or written mode but its interactive goals and structures: genre, register, and speech event all play significant roles.

Orality and Literacy. Professor Walter Ong’s book explores some of the profound changes in our thought processes, personality and social structures which are the result, at various stages of our history, of the development of speech, writing and print. And he projects his analysis further into the age of mass electronic communications medi. he cumulative impact of the book is dazzling. It is useful to approach orality and literacy synchronically, by comparing oral cultures and chirographic (. writing) cultures that coexist at a given period of time. The literate mind and the oral past.

Spoken and written narration in Hebrew: A case study. Google Scholar Citations. View all Google Scholar citations for this article.

Homogeneity and heterogeneity in disciplinary discourse: tracking the management of intertextuality in undergraduate academic lectures. Nicholas Mark Endacott.

Sık kullanılan terimler ve kelime öbekleri.

Typical spoken discourse tends to be unplanned, informal, and directed to . Processing Varieties in English: An Examination of Oral and Written Speech Across Genres.

Typical spoken discourse tends to be unplanned, informal, and directed to a. limited number of listeners who are generally known to and interacting with the. speaker, often providing immediate (verbal and/or nonverbal) feedback. Ongoing advances in computer technology have opened up a deluge of new datasets for understanding human behavior (Goldstone & Lupyan, 2016). Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press.

Tannen, Deborah, 1980a, A comparative analysis of oral narrative strategies: Athenian Greek and American English .

Tannen, Deborah, 1980a, A comparative analysis of oral narrative strategies: Athenian Greek and American English, in: The Pear Stories, W. Chafe, e. Ablex, Norwood. Tannen, Deborah, 1980b, Implications of the oral/literate continuum for cross-cultural communication, in: Current Issues in Bilingual Education, J. Alatis, e. Georgetown U. Press, Washington, . Tannen, Deborah, forthcoming, Oral and literate strategies in spoken and written discourse, In: Literacy in the 1980’s, R. Bailey, e. U. of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor.

Advances in Discourse Processes 9. New York: Ablex, 1983. back to top. Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content on this page.

Coherence in Spoken and Written Discourse (Advances in Discourse Processes).

Coherence in Spoken and. Written Discourse. VOLUME XII in the Series. Advances in discourse processes. Part II. Alternative views of orality and literacy. Georgetown University. ABLEX Publishing Corporation. 3m Coordination and Subordination Revisited: Syntactic. Complexity in Spoken and Written Narrative Discourse Karen Beaman. Background 46 The Study 52 The Sentence 54 1~he Analysis of Syntactic Structure Coordinat. ion 60 Subordination 61. Summary C:onclusion I~eferences.

As discourse analysis has turned linguistic attention to texts, it is crucial to understand the relationship between various kinds of texts. Spoken vs. written modes constitute one of the basic distinguishing characteristics of texts and is a natural stepping-off point for such an inquiry. Furthermore, all the issues of applied linguisticshow language affects and is used in everyday interaction, education, and various special settingswill be enlightened by an understanding of 1) the relationship of spoken to written language, and 2) how language attitudes and conventions associated with orality and literacy influence discourse.

This volume addresses these issues of discourse analysis and embodies two crucial features that have characterized much recent work in this area. It is broadly interdisciplinary, including research in anthropology, psychology, and literature as well as linguistics, which is at the core. And it is deeply humanistic, looking at language always in context and as a human endeavor.

The authors of these collected papers demonstrate that complexities found in discourse in context reflect not only its spoken or written mode but its interactive goals and structures: genre, register, and speech event all play significant roles. A number of the chapters consider the relationship of literary to conversational language and find them closer, and distinctions between them foggier, than had previously been thought. Finally, we have a view of individuals and societies caught in changing traditions of orality and literacy intertwined with each other and with chirography, print, and technology.