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ePub Taxi to Tashkent: Two Years with the Peace Corps in Uzbekistan download

by Tom Fleming

ePub Taxi to Tashkent: Two Years with the Peace Corps in Uzbekistan download
Author:
Tom Fleming
ISBN13:
978-0595429974
ISBN:
0595429971
Language:
Publisher:
iUniverse, Inc. (August 30, 2007)
Category:
Subcategory:
Writing Research & Publishing Guides
ePub file:
1121 kb
Fb2 file:
1121 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
925

Fleming was a 40-year-old deadender when in 2002 he decided to escape a boring cubicle job by enlisting in the Peace Corps. Tom Fleming was a Peace Corp volunteer in his early forties when arriving in Uzbekistan

Fleming was a 40-year-old deadender when in 2002 he decided to escape a boring cubicle job by enlisting in the Peace Corps. Tom Fleming was a Peace Corp volunteer in his early forties when arriving in Uzbekistan. His analysis of the region, the people and the culture is that of a young man and at the same time, there are serious interludes and bits of analysis within the humor. The descriptions of almost every scene are very vivid.

Taxi to Tashkent is by 40-year-old American Peace Corps volunteer Tom Fleming. One can hardly imagine a more illustrative example of East – West culture clashes than this, and this interesting book certainly bears this out. I must admit it took me some time to warm to Fleming as a narrator her. rom the outset he comes acros Taxi to Tashkent is by 40-year-old American Peace Corps volunteer Tom Fleming.

Tom Fleming went to Uzbekistan as a forty year old Peace Corps volunteer

Tom Fleming went to Uzbekistan as a forty year old Peace Corps volunteer. He was a fish out of water, an infidel in a Muslim land, teaching AIDS prevention and sex education in the most conservative region of Central Asia. With humor and poignancy Taxi to Tashkent portrays a land little known in the West. Instead of a nation rife with Islamic extremists as portrayed in the Western media, Fleming discovers a land of Korean discos, where blue eyed Muslims listen to Shania Twain, and where shop owners break into applause at the mention of America.

He spent two years in the former Soviet Republic of Uzbekistan conducting AIDS education.

At age 40, Tom Fleming found himself bored with his office job in Austin and decided to join the Peace Corps.

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This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Taxi to Tashkent : Two Years with the Peace Corps in Uzbekistan. Only 5 left! Book Format: Paperback.

Tom Fleming went to Uzbekistan as a forty year old Peace Corps volunteer. Taxi to Tashkent is his first book. He was a fish out of water, an infidel in a Muslim land, teaching AIDS prevention and sex education in one of the most conservative regions of Central Asia. With humor and poignancy, 'Taxi to Tashkent' portrays a land little known in the West. Tom Fleming grew up in Salinas, California, and attended California State University, Fresno, where he received a BA degree in journalism. Fleming has lived in Los Angeles, London, St. Petersburg, Russia, and currently resides in Austin, Texas.

Two Years with the Peace Corps in Uzbekistan. Published August 30, 2007 by iUniverse, In. .Social life and customs, Description and travel, Peace Corps (. Social conditions, Volunteer workers in social service, Biography.

His first book, 'Taxi to Tashkent - Two Years with the Peace Corps in Uzbekistan' . Tom Fleming lives and works in Austin, Texas. Fleming graduated from California State University, Fresno with a BA in Journalism.

His first book, 'Taxi to Tashkent - Two Years with the Peace Corps in Uzbekistan', describes the two years he spent. His first book, 'Taxi to Tashkent - Two Years with the Peace Corps in Uzbekistan', describes the two years he spent teaching about HIV prevention to fundamentalist Muslims. More from Tom Fleming. Recent Articles By Tom Fleming. The Couch Potato's Guide to Running a Marathon - A Marathon Ain't Just For Athletes.

Taxi to Tashkent: Two Years with the Peace Corps in Uzbekistan (2007) by Tom Fleming. Chai Budesh? Anyone for Tea? (2008) by Joan Heron, subtitled 'A Peace Corps Memoir of Turkmenistan'. This Is Not Civilization (2004) by Robert Rosenberg. A novel chronicling the travails of a Peace Corps volunteer that is partly set in Kyrgyzstan. Revolution Baby (2007) by Saffia Farr. Volunteer opportunities exist at the Sworde-Teppa (ww. worde-teppa. uk) organisation in Kurgonteppa in southern Tajikistan

Between Us by Thrity Umrigar 2007 (India) Holy Cow : An Indian Adventure by Sarah Macdonald 2004 (India).

Jeff Koob 2002 (Jamaica) Land without Time : A Peace Corps Volunteer in Afghanistan by John Sumser 2006 Two Years in the Kingdom : The Adventures of an American Peace Corps Volunteer in Northeast Thailand by Blaine L. Comeaux 2002 (Thailand) Taxi to Tashkent : Two Years with the Peace Corps in Uzbekistan by Tom Fleming 2007 (Uzbekistan) 3 Shattered Pearl by Sara Armstrong 2006 (Uganda).

This is a police state This is a democracy This is rot-gut vodka This is $2 prostitutes This is Peace Corps This is good intentions This is Ramadan This is loyalty This is power outages This is corruption This is the Silk Route This is the former USSR This is Uzbekistan

Tom Fleming went to Uzbekistan as a forty year old Peace Corps volunteer. He was a fish out of water, an infidel in a Muslim land, teaching AIDS prevention and sex education in the most conservative region of Central Asia.

With humor and poignancy Taxi to Tashkent portrays a land little known in the West. Instead of a nation rife with Islamic extremists as portrayed in the Western media, Fleming discovers a land of Korean discos, where blue eyed Muslims listen to Shania Twain, and where shop owners break into applause at the mention of America.

Fleming travels throughout Uzbekistan, from the ecological disaster site of the Aral Sea, to the ancient Silk Route cities of Bukhara and Samarkand. Taxi to Tashkent describes a little-known corner of the world where nothing appears as it seems.

  • So much goodwill, so little time, so few words to describe what really was happening in this country in this time and place!

    He sketches the humanity of the US effort to provide a Peace Corps presence in a challenging world in personal terms...with vivid words and without photographs.

    As a PCV in this time and place "Taxi to Tashkent" brought home to me, 10 years after my service was completed, the experiences, feelings, and surroundings the author lived through. Journaling, an exercise in maintaining your sanity as a Peace Corps volunteer, becomes an anchor to his descriptive stories. Central Asia, Uzbekistan in particular, is a land full of contrasts. Tom in his book is able to set forth his true to life remembrances in real-world terms. His characterizations of Uzbeks, Russians, and Americans are real. He touches upon human values, dramatic survival PCV skills, and the political/historical realities that frame the Uzbek lifestyle in a sensitive, yet thought provoking manner.

    Highly recommended to any future Peace Corps volunteers!

  • Because I'm headed for Uzbekistan next month, I've picked up Tom Fleming's Taxi to Tashkent. Fleming was a 40-year-old deadender when in 2002 he decided to escape a boring cubicle job by enlisting in the Peace Corps. Possibly because Fleming did have some Russian language facility resulting from an earlier "escape," he was assigned to Uzbekistan.

    I'm not very far into this book, but am underwhelmed with his almost 100% negative vision (reinforced by his total inability to see anything interesting between Fresno & my home city Bakersfield), his difficulties in developing even short-term relationships with the Uzbekis (he seldom knows their names, seems to avoid them & complains endlessly about not being able to understand them) & before this with fellow Peace Corps volunteers.

    Fleming's definitely a loner with not much positive to say about anyone. He characterizes the young PCVs, those in their 20s, by nose rings & boozing & he doesn't find anything in common with the eldest, aged 73, or a 35-year-old woman. He characterizes the Tashkent area language teacher by her florid makeup & red hair--a wig?--and her threats to send anyone who doesn't pass the language exam back to the USA. Fleming so far hasn't developed any kind of relationship with the doctor to whom he's assigned in the Ferghana Valley. He spends his time in the clinic or whatever office looking at the glacially moving "wristwatch clock."

    Fleming periodically speaks wistfully of Tim, another PCV who bailed out in Instanbul before the final destination, Tashkent. I keep thinking "You should have done this too!". So far, the author focuses on the worst in everything. I may change my mind as I move into this book, if indeed I do steel myself to finish it, delete this review & write a more positive one.

  • For me, this book was the most fun of all the travelogues and personal histories of Central Asia simply because it was the most realistic, grittiest and had the best dialogue. I spent a few years living and working in the fmr. Soviet Central Asia as well. Fleming (note the irony of the surname, Ian Fleming) presents himself as the straight laced do gooder. There is another writer and story (re Khiva, author Alexander) who probably fits that bill a little easier.

    Tom Fleming was a Peace Corp volunteer in his early forties when arriving in Uzbekistan. His analysis of the region, the people and the culture is that of a young man and at the same time, there are serious interludes and bits of analysis within the humor. The descriptions of almost every scene are very vivid. He's not just a do gooder, our protagonist in this history gets the girl (both of them, one far away, one local) and the last scene is perhaps the most touching (involving Gulnora) much like a civilian James Bond.

    As I saw it, the book is quite positive, gritty and very realistic. All the characters show life, a bit of cynicism and determination, not just Fleming the American. If the scene shows some poverty and corruption, that was fine for me-- the most important thing is the portrayal of the characters and Tom's friends (both other Peace Corps volunteers and many local Uzbeks, Tajiks, etc.) were enterprising, determined and not lacking in initiative. Fleming doesn't judge, he puts the scene together of what is happening, the context and the outcome(s). The reader is left to judge for the most part.

    I disagree with those who feel that this is a book which portrays Uzbekistan in a negative light. It's simply a history or glimpse of two years of someone who (unlike a 25 year old) has lived a bit of a life, been through some ups and downs and now is reporting a different phase of his life through experienced eyes.