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ePub If You Don't Like the Possum, Enjoy the Sweet Potatoes: Some Principles for Travel along the Road of Life download

by John H. Hayes

ePub If You Don't Like the Possum, Enjoy the Sweet Potatoes: Some Principles for Travel along the Road of Life download
Author:
John H. Hayes
ISBN13:
978-1606087909
ISBN:
1606087908
Language:
Publisher:
Wipf & Stock Pub (January 1, 2010)
Category:
Subcategory:
Writing Research & Publishing Guides
ePub file:
1884 kb
Fb2 file:
1787 kb
Other formats:
mbr doc txt doc
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
124

This book is proof that John Hayes is far more interested in saying something true than in saying something agreeable. John H. Hayes is Emeritus Professor of Old Testament at Emory University's Candler School of Theology

This book is proof that John Hayes is far more interested in saying something true than in saying something agreeable. If you have ever worried about the way your toenails look as you get older-or about how to live with integrity in a world full of scoundrels and a few good friends-you will find companionship in this volume. What sets it apart from others in its genre is Hayes's aversion to sentiment and cliché. Hayes is Emeritus Professor of Old Testament at Emory University's Candler School of Theology. He is also the author of Understanding the Psalms and coauthor of A History of Ancient Israel and Judah, 2nd e. and A New Chronology for the Kings of Israel and Judah.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading If You Don't Like the Possum, Enjoy . This book is proof that John Hayes is far more interested in saying something true than in saying something agreeable

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading If You Don't Like the Possum, Enjoy the Sweet Potatoes: Some Principles for Travel along the Road of Life. This book is proof that John Hayes is far more interested in saying something true than in saying something agreeable. Every page of this book is as tart as a pickle.

by John H Hayes (Author). Unfortunately a whole chunk of this book was missing. As I did not get around to reading it straight away, I did not notice until it was too late; so did not qualify for a refund or exchange.

In short, direct prose, John Hayes. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking If You Don't Like the Possum, Enjoy the Sweet Potatoes: Some Principles for Travel Along the Road of Life as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. If You Don't Like the. Drawn from his studies, his childhood, and anywhere else Hayes could discover lessons for us all, this volume combines humor, philosophy, and traditional and practical wisdom.

When it is impossible to like the possum, we should focus on enjoying the sweet potatoes: they can be a meal in themselves

Write: Permissions, Wipf and Stock Publishers, 199 W. 8th Av. Suite 3, Eugene, OR 97401. When it is impossible to like the possum, we should focus on enjoying the sweet potatoes: they can be a meal in themselves. Don’t spend your days setting yourself up as a target on other people’s firing ranges. 2 Give People Enough Rope. and They Will Hang You.

Travel Life Sweet Potato Ebooks Potatoes Voyage Viajes Trips Traveling. Every so often I have the fun opportunity to highlight some great writing, or a good book I think people need to know about. Today we talk to Nate Phillips, a pastor and the author of Do Somethin. umors of the Church’s Demise Are Greatly Exaggerated: An Interview with Nate Phillips.

If You Don't Like the Possum, Enjoy the Sweet Potatoes : Some Principles for Travel Along the Road of Life

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some principles for travel along the road of life. by John H. Hayes Life is less like a consommé and more like a stew. Certitude is the breeding ground of intolerance and violence. Life is less like a consommé and more like a stew. Try to live so your children won't want to piss on your tombstone. Nobody is ever greatly bothered by their own personally produced methane. If you own a male dog, eat the fruit from high off the tree. Don't burn your bridges before you cross them. Commuting is never back and forth but always forth and back. That nightmare may be Uncle Og and Aunt Ig fleeing from a saber-toothed tiger.

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"There's more wisdom in these pages than in an airlift or convoy of Chinese fortune cookies. John's take on late-night comedians and the news is alone worth the modest price he's charging for opening our eyes and ears to some good 'ol truths from the school of hard knocks. I just wish he'd written this sooner; it might have saved my life." --Bill Moyers "This book is proof that John Hayes is far more interested in saying something true than in saying something agreeable. If you have ever worried about the way your toenails look as you get older-or about how to live with integrity in a world full of scoundrels and a few good friends-you will find companionship in this volume. What sets it apart from others in its genre is Hayes's aversion to sentiment and cliché. Every page of this book is as tart as a pickle." --Barbara Brown Taylor author of Leaving Church and An Altar in the World "I am recommending this slim volume, but with qualifiers. Do not read rapidly. This book consists of only fifty-two pieces, but they are not pieces; each one is whole and complete. I recommend one a day. But fast or slow, you'll be seduced. Like philosophy? Plato is here but he often sounds like an Alabama farmer. Like poetry? Some of these lines soar, but be prepared to land in the old cat's litter box. Like old maxims? They are here, but John may play the flip side, which is also true. As C. H. Dodd said of Jesus' parables, these musings will 'tease your mind into active thought.' Enjoy." --Fred Craddock Bandy Professor Emeritus, Emory University "John Hayes knows how to make people laugh and think at the same time. Both scholar and farmer, the author is equally at home with professors or pigs. His style is satirical and earthy, of the genre of Lardner, Twain, and Rogers. If you don't like the humor, enjoy the wisdom. I relish both!" --Bevel Jones Retired Bishop, United Methodist Church "Somewhere between Aesop's fables and Damon Runyon's tales, these down home homilies are food for the southern soul-and anyone else who cares to be entertained and edified!" --Judith Landau, MD President, International Family Therapy Association
  • The essays are deeply insightful and filled with gentle humor. The writing is beautiful. There is a lot to ponder in this wonderful collection. I love to give this book as a gift. It never fails to please.

  • Great book. Full of wits. A classic Dr. Hayes' work. A must read.

  • I feel ripped off this is not a worthwhile read. The writing was poor and the subject matter was and is worthless.Don't buy this book.

  • Unfortunately a whole chunk of this book was missing. As I did not get around to reading it straight away, I did not notice until it was too late; so did not qualify for a refund or exchange. Very disappointing.

  • I loved this book by a witty, insightful, and powerful author. Too bad more of these cannot be created. Xoxo

  • In the world structured by the surreal images created in Hollywood, this book comes as a welcome relief--a book that draws upon real experiences to convey real insights into real living. John H. Hayes is nearing 77 now, and this little compendium of vignettes and insights is the product of a lifetime of work on behalf of others, primarily as a professor at Emory University. Yet rather than the flavor of a patrician who held a chair in a Southern Ivy League university, this book contains the wisdom of a man who arose from the poverty of the Old South's sharecropper system to become a major scholar in his field. There is much more of the former than the latter in this book, as the title certainly suggest, and it is a book that gives us precisely insights into that bygone era, and into our own humanity that that lens. From the opening account of the preparation, baking and serving of possum and sweet potatoes (How many of us have actually had THAT experience?!), to the narration of his experiences growning up white in the segregated South with a black youth as his best friend, this book preserves an invaluable glimpse of a world that has long-since disappeared. And while Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird" gave as a picture of that world from the standpoint of the daughter of an affluent family, of which one brother was and attorney and the other a notable doctor, Hayes' book preserves the view from the white working class, which comes off very badly in Lee's book. As Hayes notes, it was a society set up so that whites could advance, but that blacks could not (paraphrased). Throughout, the book is a must-read, a primer on life to be carried and read episode-by-episode. Since Lisa Howorth and her colleagues published "Yellow Dogs, Hushpuppies, and Bluetick Hounds: The Official Encyclopedia of Southern Culture Quizbook" in 1996, no more penetrating book on Southern culture has appeared.

  • You could do yourself a favor and visit Mr Hayes through his book, for Mr. Hayes has a gift for helping people and this book is a great way to get sage advice from a master giver. Once upon a time in my life, I had a surrogate Granny that was loved by anyone who knew her. She was the perfect grandmother that welcomed each as they were. Every single Sunday that I had the priviledge of knowing her, she cooked from fifteen to twenty (hard to believe) perfect, separate courses for the noontime meal, even, if no one was expected. Mrs. Zannie Townsend knew that freely given food was the way to the human heart. Guess what? Inevitably, she had many partakers of her fantastic cooking just to be with her. Each of the observations by Mr. Hayes are as good as experiencing Mrs. Townsend's cooking and friendship.