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ePub At the Tomb of the Inflatable Pig: Travels Through Paraguay download

by JOHN GIMLETTE

ePub At the Tomb of the Inflatable Pig: Travels Through Paraguay download
Author:
JOHN GIMLETTE
ISBN13:
978-0091794330
ISBN:
0091794331
Language:
Publisher:
HUTCHINSON; First Edition edition (2003)
Category:
Subcategory:
Writing Research & Publishing Guides
ePub file:
1376 kb
Fb2 file:
1596 kb
Other formats:
lrf mbr doc docx
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
622

The author does a great job summarizing Paraguay's history and politics from "El Supremo" through relatively recent times.

At The Tomb of the Inflatable Pig should be ranked among the very best explorations of its kind: at once a history and a guide to one of the least hospitable nations on earth. -The Washington Times. Irreverent and rambunctious. The author does a great job summarizing Paraguay's history and politics from "El Supremo" through relatively recent times. If you only want to read one book on Paraguay's history, then this is the one for you as it contains a summary of the Triple Alliance War (Paraguay versus Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay) as the author visited many of the main battle sites and the Chaco War fought against Bolivia.

Now, John Gimlette’s eye-opening book–equal parts travelogue, history, and unorthodox travel guide–breaches .

Now, John Gimlette’s eye-opening book–equal parts travelogue, history, and unorthodox travel guide–breaches the boundaries of this isolated land, and illuminates a little-understood place and its people. It is a wonderfully animated telling of Paraguay's story: of cannibals, Jesuits, and sixteenth-century Anabaptists; of Victorian Australian socialists and talented smugglers; of dictators and their mad mistresses; bloody wars and Utopian settlements; and of lives transplanted from Japan, Britain, Poland, Russia, Germany, Ireland, Korea, and the United States

Author John Gimlette, who lived and traveled in Paraguay has an eye and ear for . The first quarter of the book was fragmented and uninteresting

Author John Gimlette, who lived and traveled in Paraguay has an eye and ear for the eccentric, which is lucky because the motto for this country should be kind of like those apartment complex signs along the expressway, If you lived here, you’d want to keep driving. It would be kind to say Paraguay has had a history of hard luck. Paraguay also fought Bolivia in the Chaco War, the bloodiest war in 20th century South American history. The first quarter of the book was fragmented and uninteresting. The rest was better, as stories go, but I never learned to like the patchy and chronologically chaotic nature of the book.

Replete with eccentrics and scoundrels, ecologically minded cannibals and utopians from every corner of the earth, At the Tomb of the Inflatable Pig is a madly entertaining book.

Haven to Nazis, smugglers’ paradise, home to some of the earth’s oddest wildlife and most baroquely awful dictatorships, Paraguay is a nation waiting for the right chronicler. In John Gimlette, at last it has one. With an adventurer’s sang-froid, a historian’s erudition, and a sense of irony so keen you could cut a finger on it, Gimlette celebrates the beauty, horror and–yes–charm of South America’s obscure and remote island surrounded by land. Replete with eccentrics and scoundrels, ecologically minded cannibals and utopians from every corner of the earth, At the Tomb of the Inflatable Pig is a madly entertaining book.

As I rummaged through Paraguay’s history, I realised that isolation explained much of what was . Other author's books: At the Tomb of the Inflatable Pig. Wild Coast. At the Tomb of the Inflatable Pig. Menu.

As I rummaged through Paraguay’s history, I realised that isolation explained much of what was otherwise inexplicable. There seemed few points at which it had connected with the outside world. In the long day of human existence, Paraguay was only noticed in the nanoseconds before midnight.

MORE BY Kenneth Maxwell. At the Tomb of the Inflatable Pig: Travels Through Paraguay. Many such pieces of unforgettable history enliven this superior travel book, which also includes a good retelling of the Paraguayan war and perceptive observation of the contemporary scene.

Originally published: London : Hutchinson, 2003. Includes bibliographical references (pages 359-362). Haven to Nazis, smugglers' paradise, home to some of the earth's oddest wildlife and most baroquely awful dictatorships, Paraguay is a nation waiting for the right chronicler. With an adventurer's sang-froid, a historian's erudition, and a sense of irony so keen you could cut a finger on it, Gimlette celebrates the beauty, horror and-yes-charm of South America's obscure and remote "island surrounded by land.

In John Gimlette, at last it has one. With an adventurers sang-froid, a historians erudition, and a sense of. . With an adventurers sang-froid, a historians erudition, and a sense of irony so keen you could cut a finger on it, Gimlette celebrates the beauty, horror and yes charm of South Americas obscure and remote œisland surrounded by land.

Gimlette wanders through Paraguay, name dropping figures like Josef Mengele, who arrived here not long after the war and happily found Paraguay completely unconcerned about his past, to the Jesuits of the film "The.

Gimlette wanders through Paraguay, name dropping figures like Josef Mengele, who arrived here not long after the war and happily found Paraguay completely unconcerned about his past, to the Jesuits of the film "The Mission", to the absolute lunatic dictator who managed to kill off about 90% of his male population fighting an unwinnable wa. Maybe it's just that I'm not all that interested in Paraguay or maybe it's because I've lost patience after reading a rash of bad books, but I couldn't get through John Gimlette's "At the Tomb of the Inflatable Pi.

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  • Although most facts are presented accurately, the tone and perspective given in this book are negative and critical of human beings living in this country. He might have chosen to shock readers in order to achieve more interest. There are inaccuracies (I never heard that people eat piranha soup in Paraguay, for example. Lido restaurant serves its popular surubi soup!) and most facts are told to enhance and radicalize this warm hearted country. One can paint any kind of picture (with the good and bad) of any country's history, and this author used his darker side to enhance the bad in order to degrade it. Many Paraguayans welcomed the author with hospitality and he returned a slap on their faces.

  • Paraguay prides itself on being a country of "lace and legend". Strange, bizarre things occur almost daily and things that are readily accepted by the Paraguayans cause most Americans and Europeans to scratch their heads in amazement. I continue to contend that this is mostly because modern day Paraguay's culture and people and politics are based on the influence of the Guarani language that most people, even immigrants, speak. Most of us observe the Paraguayan's activities and events from a Euro-centric point of view that limits our understanding of the Paraguayan mind set and acceptance of things that causes our brains to short circuit sometimes. Those of you married into a Paraguayan family will lovingly appreciate the classification. The rest will just have to imagine the pleasure, shock and joy one experiences in the Paraguayan culture. This book is a good introduction for you.

    The author does a great job summarizing Paraguay's history and politics from "El Supremo" through relatively recent times. If you only want to read one book on Paraguay's history, then this is the one for you as it contains a summary of the Triple Alliance War (Paraguay versus Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay) as the author visited many of the main battle sites and the Chaco War fought against Bolivia. Plus it touches on the revolution, Stroessner, Rodriguez and many of the other main political persons from recent times. You could use this book as your main information source for a college paper, or even a Master's Thesis.

    The author's observations will offend every one and no one as they are mostly spot-on and have little to no political-correctness restrictions. This book will cause laughter, amazement, anger, disgust, consternation, dumfoundedness and spark a general desire to visit Paraguay again, and again. The other reviews here do a good job of discussing the book's contents so I won't repeat it.

    If you want a good read with a little of everything included (murder, crime, romance, sex, business, trade, culture, etc.) then this should be the book for you.

  • I read this book prior to a visit to Paraguay. It was most enlightening and enabled me to act as a tour guide in a country where there are no tour guides. The book seems surrealistic until you get there, then it makes perfect sense. One of my favorite stories is the tale of "The Opera Singer", one of Stroessner's henchmen who would sing arias while torturing his victims. The country is great, bring along your Spanish, little English is spoken there.

  • I found this book very entertaining and enjoyable to read, but the writing style and the editing are a little unconventional, to say the least. The author jumps around a lot and the only thing that might give a clue as to the order of the jumbled historical information presented, is the sequence of the author's travels throughout the country. I say "might" because this is implied, rather than stated anywhere.

    That said, the author gets across his point that Paraguay is a fascinating country, with lots of colorful and unconventional figures in its past. I learned a lot about the history of the nation, what it might be like to live there and some of the interesting things it contains. I was also entertained by many the interesting anecdotes, both historical and biographical. What more could you want from a travel book?

  • j.Gimlette is one of the most well informed "travel" writers on Latin America. I know the history of these regions very well ( I am a devote of his other book, "On the Wild coast" about the guianas. Yes there are plenty of personal anecdotes, but there is also alot o historical framing so while at first blush his analysis seems steeped in exotica. in fact, its not: its the magical realism of some of these places, and also he doesn't flinch from their often gaspingly brutal histories that have produced the absurdities and tragedies that now unfold there. His prose is elegant, often he breaks your heart. But he has bothered to explore the deeper dimesnions of these places, so while at first blush it seems, as they say a "romp", he describes a terrible logic the really of which affects him profoundly.

  • This is one of the most extraordinary histories/adventure tales/personal journals I have ever read. I learned a great deal while balancing between shock and black comedy. For fans of Flashman, this is a great read. For others, it is an equally great read.

  • I was a Peace Corps volunteer in Paraguay for 27 months so that made me interested in this book. It covers what made me love Paraguay even in the rare moments I hated it. It's not a travel guide (nor does it claim to be) but it does talk about various historic landmarks and events and relates them to the significance for the development of the nation's psyche. If you are planning on visiting Paraguay I'd strongly recommend this book in addition to whatever travel guide you choose.

  • This author gives an interesting commentary on the various experiences of traveling in Paraguay. I enjoyed his colorful descriptions and apt turns of phrase.