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ePub A Fez of the Heart: Travels around Turkey in Search of a Hat download

by Jeremy Seal

ePub A Fez of the Heart: Travels around Turkey in Search of a Hat download
Author:
Jeremy Seal
ISBN13:
978-0156003933
ISBN:
0156003937
Language:
Publisher:
Mariner Books; First edition (March 28, 1996)
Category:
Subcategory:
Writing Research & Publishing Guides
ePub file:
1456 kb
Fb2 file:
1609 kb
Other formats:
mbr mobi lrf doc
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
388

I will be traveling to Turkey and around so this book gave me some insight into the culture and some ideas of what to. .This book isn't quite history; it's more of a travelogue.

I will be traveling to Turkey and around so this book gave me some insight into the culture and some ideas of what to look for while I'm there. The travelogue's attempts to describe Turkey viewed through fez-colored glasses falls a little short, but the historical aspects of Seal's wanderings are on-key. The delvings into Western newspaper correspondents he presents are fascinating, if blatantly discriminatory (we'll not forget this was in the 1920s, and said correspondents were imperial Brits who still believed in Piltdown Man).

Jeremy Seal has worked in publishing, taught in Turkey and. now writes travel articles for publications including the Daily. He lives in Gloucestershire. Telegraph, The Times and the Sunday Times. First published 1995 by Picador.

Jeremy Seal found a fez in his attic which inspired him to not only learn to speak Turkish, but also spend a significant time .

Jeremy Seal found a fez in his attic which inspired him to not only learn to speak Turkish, but also spend a significant time in Turkey immersing himself in their culture. I've liked every Turk I've met, too, and dated one Turk for a year or so.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. The Man in the Rockefeller Suit.

Jeremy Seal set out across Turkey, in the extremes of winter, to trace the astonishing history of a cone-shaped .

Jeremy Seal set out across Turkey, in the extremes of winter, to trace the astonishing history of a cone-shaped hat. He soon saw the fez as the key by which Turkey, beset by contradiction, might be understood. Almost all you could ever need to know about modern Turkey, modern Turks and their one-time headgear. Extremely well written and very funny’ Eric Newby.

Inspired by a dusty fez in his parents' attic, Jeremy Seal set off in 1993 to trace the astonishing history of this cone-shaped hat. Soon, the quintessentially Turkish headgear became the key to understanding a country beset by contradictions.

Jeremy Seal has written for numerous English newspapers. His first book, A Fez of the Heart, was chosen as a Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year and short-listed for the Thomas Cook Travel Book Award. His second book, The Snakebite Survivor's Club, was a New York Public Library Exceptional Book of the Year. He lives in Bath, England, with his wife and daughters.

From there Seal traveled around the country, visiting eastern cities where intractable fez wearers were once hanged, exploring the troubled Kurdish southeast, watching the production of fez-shaped hats for whirling dervishes in the mystical central city of Konya. The result of his unusual journey is an engaging and agile mix of history and travel, politics and reportage. Soon the quintessentially Turkish headgear became the key to understanding a country beset by contradictions. A modern travel classic" (Herald Express).

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Jeremy Seal (author). Paperback 306 Pages, Published: 12/01/1996. This is Jeremy Seal's quest, by means of a fez, for the heart of a country culturally and spiritually at odds with herself. The fez's opposing associations - both revered Eastern-Islamic headdress and banal tourist souvenir - exactly reflects Turkey's cultural faultline. Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

Inspired by a dusty fez in his parents’ attic, Jeremy Seal set off in 1993 to trace the astonishing history of this cone-shaped hat. Soon the quintessentially Turkish headgear became the key to understanding a country beset by contradictions. “A modern travel classic” (Herald Express).
  • This is a very well-crafted travelogue about Turkey by a writer/journalist who has taken the time to learn Turkish as well as the history and culture of the places through which he is traveling. He turns a mean metaphor too.

    It is however very puzzling that he chose to tour the country in winter, including the frozen highland parts of the country in the east, which makes for hard traveling and unlovely cityscapes. Combine the wintry weather with his quixotic quest to find the origins of the fez (the funny-looking Ottoman headgear), and you have a downright eccentric kind of travel book. Despite that, read this book and you'll learn a lot about Turkey, and laugh out loud quite a few times.

  • I have to confess that I enjoyed the book. that's a confession because I can understand how it must offend many Turks. Anyone who writes about the politics and recent history of Turkey is bound to offend someone. I thought the author tried hard to present the different viewpoints of Turks, Greeks, Armenians and Arabs. The problem was that he also tried hard to be funny. Sometimes he succeeded, but sometimes the humor is at the level of the pun in the title. There is something ludicrous about the state prescribing what clothes people must wear. All governments, including Western ones, do this to some extent. He could have made the point more effectively without playing so obviously for laughs. Many countries contain poor and backward rural areas and fundamentalist religious groups

  • I will be traveling to Turkey and around so this book gave me some insight into the culture and some ideas of what to look for while I'm there.

  • This book helped me learn more about the Moroccan culture and history in a fun and interesting way. I love to go to Morocco and it helped me understand the people more.

  • Well-written Turkish travelogue that slips in little-known history of modern Turkey that provides background for the recent turning away from secularism.

  • Funny, easy to read, quirky book. Provides a lot of information about the history and culture of Turkey while keeping the reader engaged.

  • This book isn't quite history; it's more of a travelogue. The travelogue's attempts to describe Turkey viewed through fez-colored glasses falls a little short, but the historical aspects of Seal's wanderings are on-key. The delvings into Western newspaper correspondents he presents are fascinating, if blatantly discriminatory (we'll not forget this was in the 1920s, and said correspondents were imperial Brits who still believed in Piltdown Man). Seal spends a good deal of time in rural Turkey, running into strange individuals and quietly mocking them in imitable fashion (we here at History House have come to recognize dry wit ubiquitous to British travel writers). To be frank, he made us long for the apparently unavailable 1839 book Character and Costume in Turkey and Italy, by Thomas Allom, which was written at the transitional moment between the turban and the fez and filled with all manner of dress idiosyncrasies. He tries to make it all heartwarming in the end, but the fact of the matter is that he searches Turkey all over for a damn fez and never really finds one. Instead he scratches his head over the Turkish dichotomy of Islamism versus Europeanism, which is a phenomenon that many modern Turkish politicians, and Turks themselves, seem to be trying to straddle. Go figure. [HistoryHouse.com]

  • Jeremy Seal's "A Fez of the Heart: Travels Around Turkey in Search of a Hat" is a fun travelogue, but it's also a bit more. Seal may not quite have the historical sweep of a Jason Goodwin, the literary panache of a Bruce Chatwin or the daring of an Eric Hansen. But in pursuing his personal obsession with the fez (first imposed then banned a century later by regimes seeking to improve Turkey's image), Seal addresses some important cultural and aesthetic questions for the age of PoPoMo globalism. Must memes from traditional cultures be lost as the world gets smaller? And can "modern" or "western" admirers of those memes keep them alive as more than a poor parody of the original? Much of the music I find most compelling attempts be simultaneously reverent and irreverent as it mines traditional forms, but Seal finds that it is no longer possible to wear a fez without irony. I fear that as goes the fez, so goes all traditional culture.