mostraligabue
» » Are You Somebody?

ePub Are You Somebody? download

by o-faolain-nuala

ePub Are You Somebody? download
Author:
o-faolain-nuala
ISBN13:
978-1905494538
ISBN:
190549453X
Language:
Publisher:
New Island Books (2007)
Category:
Subcategory:
Writing Research & Publishing Guides
ePub file:
1790 kb
Fb2 file:
1767 kb
Other formats:
lrf docx rtf lit
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
692

28 quotes from Nuala O'Faolain: 'The wait is long, my dream of you does . Books by Nuala O'Faolain.

28 quotes from Nuala O'Faolain: 'The wait is long, my dream of you does not en., 'If there were nothing else, reading would-obviously-be worth living fo., and . Nuala O'Faolain, Are You Somebody?: The Accidental Memoir of a Dublin Woman. See a Problem? We’d love your help. Details (if other): Cancel.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. You don't want the book to end; it glows with compassion and you want more, more because you know this is a fine wine of a life.

She became well known after the publication of her memoirs Are You Somebody? and Almost There

She became well known after the publication of her memoirs Are You Somebody? and Almost There. She went on to write a biography of Irish criminal Chicago May and two novels.

Are You Somebody? distills her experiences into a wisdom that can only come from an obstinate refusal to shrink from life.

Read Are You Somebody?, by Nuala O'Faolain online on Bookmate – One of nine children born into a penniless North Dublin family, Nuala O’Faolain was saved from a harrowing childhood by her love of b. Are You Somebody? distills her experiences into a wisdom that can only come from an obstinate refusal to shrink from life.

Nuala O'Faolain (pronounced Nula O-Fway-lawn) (1 March 1940 – 9 May 2008) was an Irish journalist, TV producer, book . O'Faolain was engaged at least once, but she never married.

O'Faolain was engaged at least once, but she never married. In Are You Somebody?, she speaks candidly about her fifteen-year relationship with the journalist Nell McCafferty, who published her own memoir, Nell. From 2002 until her death, O'Faolain lived much of the time with Brooklyn-based attorney John Low-Beer and his daughter Anna. They were registered as domestic partners in 2003.

Nuala O’Faolain was saved from a harrowing childhood by her love of books and reading. A strikingly vivid and starkly emotional memoir, Are You Somebody? is, like O’Faolain herself, a singular example of courage, honesty, and bold living. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Though she ultimately became one of Ireland’s best-known columnists, her professional success did little to ease her longing for a deep connection to the world. She pushed at the boundaries of the confining Catholic Ireland she grew up in and has distilled her experiences into a wisdom that could come only from a woman who refused to shrink from life.

O’Faolain’s Are You Somebody?, (1996) created a sensation. Continue reading the main story.

Often seen as a feminine (and feminist) counterpart to Frank McCourt’s Angela’s Ashes, Ms. O’Faolain’s Are You Somebody?, (1996) created a sensation. Nuala O’Faolain, an Irish journalist who mined a rich vein of longing and childhood suffering in two midlife memoirs and an acclaimed first novel, My Dream of You, died on Friday night in Dublin. The book became a runaway best seller and transformed its author, already a well-known opinion columnist for The Irish Times, into a bona fide celebrity despite her own sense of personal failure, one of the main themes in her writing.

O'Faolain's candor made a deep impression when the book was published in Ireland; it quickly landed on the bestseller list, staying at the top for 20 weeks. The Accidental Memoir of a Dublin Woman. As she explains in an afterword, & silent voices. were just on the brink of speaking out. I was just slightly ahead.

Are You Somebody? has the form of a long low-voiced conversation through the night, where every piece of narrative comes at the moment best suited to it, where the whole builds up through an endless return to significant pieces

Are You Somebody? has the form of a long low-voiced conversation through the night, where every piece of narrative comes at the moment best suited to it, where the whole builds up through an endless return to significant pieces. O'Faolain begins with her childhood, but she never leaves it alone. Her first family are with her right to the end: her alcoholic, passionate mother; her dapper, neglectful journalist father ("using natural charm and courtesy to keep other people at a distance") and her eight sisters and brothers, whose sadnesses she feels more deeply than her own.

Rare Book
  • I sure don't get the overall three stars on this!

    Nuala O'Faolian has written some very engaging fiction, and essays. This is a memoir and as such does not have a plot in the normal sense, nor is it expository writing. It is descriptive, musing and a somewhat inconclusive story by someone who can really write. It appears that her life was not happy so you will not find a tidy story with an uplifting ending.

    But it is not depressing. It is fascinating really; you learn about Ireland, you are engaged in the various adventures of Nuala O'Faolian's life and eventually you are engulfed by her hypnotic prose. This is not for everyone. It's a bit of an intellectual and emotional odyssey and you're not sure where you are going. If you can handle that you are well rewarded. It is very well written and engaging.

    I found Nuala O'Faolian to be great company and a wonderful discovery. I have gone on to read more. I wish more of her work was on the Kindle!

  • This is a very moving, beautifully honest, and sometimes disturbing memoir. Growing up in Dublin in the 1950s and 60s was not an easy life for women (and for many men). The sexual repression, the oppression of the Catholic church, and the complications of large families left many young women feeling isolated and confused. O'Faolain covers this terrain in a thoughtful, self-reflective, and often poetic way. She was a natural storyteller. Some of it is very sad, some very funny, and yes as other reviewers have noted there is a little bit of name-dropping, although in the end this did not bother me terribly, as she did have contact with a lot of very powerful people. It was part of her life.
    The ending of the book I found extremely sad and moving. This is a better, truer book about life in Ireland than Frank McCourt's Angela's Ashes.

  • Smoking,Drinking,and the Pub,the three main facets in the life of the Irish.Maybe not so much today but the last couple of generations have housed these three.One can feel the desolation when reading this book.what possess a a parent to abuse their children as they do?I guess this was how they were treated so they just passed it along.Life in Ireland was not for the weak of heart,WOMEN were less then second class citizens.She is a powerful writer and gets her points across in many varied forms.It was a good read for me others may not like the way it is told.It kind of shatters the idyllic dreams one has of the Emerald Isle.

  • This is the late Nuala O,faolains best seller which is a warts and all account of her personal and professional life and travels.Nuala was a gifted wordsmith and was not afraid to tackle subjects that provoke interest and critical thought in the reader.This edition is expanded to include some of her articles from her time as a professional journalist., one of which borders on faction( the term coined in the eighties to describe a mixture of fiction and fact) The book and all the articles in it held my interest intensly. Strangely,within this text ,is the only place a reader may find the article ,"The Gold coast of County Down .". sadly it was not included in a later collection of her selected articles of journalism that has been published. If you are interested in a contemporary Irish view of Ireland and the World this is an entertaining and essential read .

  • I'm as surprised at all the bad reviews, as some of you are surprised by the good ones. I would call this book one of the best i've ever read. I love books for different reasons... the quality of writing, the "story" itself, the development of the story, and/or how the book itself makes me feel - ie. how much i'm moved or entertained by it. I sobbed thru about the last 60 pages of this one. This book made me wish i knew this woman. It's incredible to me - her life, her dreams, her intelligence, her inner beauty and turmoil...everything about her. I will read this again...i will be 50 next month, and maybe this book means more to me than most - as i live alone (divorced), and never had children.

    We love things for different reasons. I love this book for all the right ones. Enjoy.

  • Nuala O'Faolain was complicated -- she tried to write this book to explain herself and/or life. She laid it out as she lived it -- fascinating and troubling. That she's at peace now is the consolation she deserved, and the goal she never found.

  • This was a slow read for me; I had to force myself to pick it up each night. I found the writing fragmented with references to many people (particularly writers) I had never heard of. The subtitle "An accidental memoir" is fitting becomes the book seems to be constructed of disjoint notes and memories (many involving drinking). A recurring theme is Faolain's disappointment with her parents' behavior (particularly her mother's alcoholism). I felt that Faolain was a bit self pitying (which she acknowledges in the book). It wasn't until the end when she discusses her surprise at being alone and her loneliness that I became more engaged in her story. Until that point, Faolain's story was a whirlwind of working, drinking, and traveling interwoven with criticisms of her parents. I am surprised that this book was a best seller and I wonder what I am missing.

  • love this writer - this book, too, is fantastic, especially anyone with an irish backgoundd