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ePub Motorcycle Diaries download

by Alexandra Keeble,Ernesto 'Che Guevara

ePub Motorcycle Diaries download
Author:
Alexandra Keeble,Ernesto 'Che Guevara
ISBN13:
978-0007182220
ISBN:
0007182228
Language:
Publisher:
Harpercollins Pub Ltd (January 31, 2004)
Category:
Subcategory:
Writing Research & Publishing Guides
ePub file:
1846 kb
Fb2 file:
1369 kb
Other formats:
doc mbr txt lit
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
799

The Motorcycle Diaries (Spanish: Diarios de Motocicleta) is a memoir that traces the early travels of Marxist revolutionary Ernesto "Che" Guevara, then a 23-year-old medical student, and his friend Alberto Granado.

The Motorcycle Diaries (Spanish: Diarios de Motocicleta) is a memoir that traces the early travels of Marxist revolutionary Ernesto "Che" Guevara, then a 23-year-old medical student, and his friend Alberto Granado, a 29-year-old biochemist. Leaving Buenos Aires, Argentina, in January 1952 on the back of a sputtering single cylinder 1939 Norton 500cc dubbed La Poderosa ("The Mighty One"), they desired to explore the South America they only knew from books

Ernesto & Guevara was born in Argentina in 1928.

Ernesto & Guevara was born in Argentina in 1928. After fighting alongside Fidel Castro in the three-year guerrilla war in Cuba, he became Minister for Industry following the victory of the Cuban Revolution. In 1966 he established a guerrilla base in Bolivia.

The Motorcycle Diaries book. In January 1952, two young men from Buenos Aires set out.

Ernesto began writing these diaries when, in December 1951, he set off with his friend Alberto Granado on their long-awaited trip from Buenos Aires, down the Atlantic coast of Argentina, across the pampas, through the Andes and into Chile, and from Chile northward to Peru and Colombia and finally to Caracas.

The Motorcycle Diaries (Paperback). One of them was the d Ernesto & Guevara. great thing about this book is that Che Guevara is never a bore. Che Guevara (author), Alexandra Keeble (translator). Written eight years before the Cuban Revolution, these are the diaries of Che Guevara, full of disasters and discoveries, high drama and laddish improvisations. It satisfies both as an enjoyable travelogue and as a chronicle of the development of one of this century's most romantic figures. In 1966 he established a guerilla base in Bolivia. He was captured and killed in 1967.

item 1 The Motorcycle Diaries: Notes on a Latin American Journey-Ernesto "Che" Guevara -The Motorcycle Diaries .

item 1 The Motorcycle Diaries: Notes on a Latin American Journey-Ernesto "Che" Guevara -The Motorcycle Diaries: Notes on a Latin American Journey-Ernesto "Che" Guevara. A Game of Thrones: The Story Continues: The complete boxset of all 7 books (A Song of Ice and Fire) by George R. R. Martin

Che Guevara’s riotous diaries charting his motorcycle odyssey from Argentina through Chile and Peru ending finally in Venezuela. In January 1952, two young men from Buenos Aires set out to explore South America on 'La Poderosa', the Powerful One: a 500cc Norton.

Che Guevara’s riotous diaries charting his motorcycle odyssey from Argentina through Chile and Peru ending finally in Venezuela. One of them was the d Che Guevara. Written eight years before the Cuban Revolution, these are Che's diaries – full of disasters and discoveries, high drama, low comedy and laddish improvisations

Ernesto 'Che' Guevara, Alexandra Keeble, Bruno Gerardo. Che Guevara's riotous diaries charting his motorcycle odyssey from Argentina through Chile and Peru ending finally in Venezuela.

Ernesto 'Che' Guevara, Alexandra Keeble, Bruno Gerardo. Written eight years before the Cuban Revolution, these are Che's diaries - full of disasters and discoveries, high drama, low comedy and laddish improvisations.

The book of the popular movie STARRING GAEL GARCIA BERNAL. Now a new york times bestseller. The young Che Guevara's lively and highly entertaining travel diary, now a popular movie and a New York Times" bestseller. This sequel to "The Motorcycle Diaries" includes letters, poetry, and journalism that document Ernesto Che Guevara's second Latin American journey following his graduation from medical school. After traveling through Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, and Central America, Ernesto witnesses the 1954 US-inspired coup in Guatemala.

An expanded and freshly translated edition of the cult bestseller, for a new generation of Che Guevara fans. In January 1952, two young men from Buenos Aires set out to explore South America on 'La Poderosa', the Powerful One: a 500cc Norton. One of them was the twenty-three-year-old Che Guevara. Written eight years before the Cuban Revolution, these are Che's diaries -- full of disasters and discoveries, high drama, low comedy and laddish improvisations. During his travels through Argentina, Chile, Peru and Venezuela, Che's main concerns are where the next drink is coming from, where the next bed is to be found and who might be around to share it. Che becomes a stowaway, a fireman and a football coach; he sometimes falls in love and frequently falls off the motorbike. Within a decade the whole world would know his name. His trip might have been an adventure of a lifetime -- had his lifetime not turned into a much greater adventure.; Features exclusive, unpublished photos taken by the 23-year old Ernesto on his journey across the continent.; and a tender preface by Aleida Guevara, offering an insightful perspetive on her father -- the man and the icon.
  • Before he was a revolutionary Ernesto Guevarra was a young man from a privileged back ground, and a medical student. He and a friend decided to travel, to see the world. Sounds very much like many if not most young men even today. He kept a diary of the adventures, escapades, and mishaps along the way. He saw a world that was new and disturbing in some places to him. Through that trip he would become the eloquent speaker, military planner, doctor, and a crusader for the downtrodden. He became Che Guevarra. But that last part is for another volume. This book introduced me to the idealistic and maybe even naive young man that he was at that point in his life.

  • I once biked across the country. In that vein, I really enjoyed the book as a diary of a guy going across the country on a motorcycle. Some of the commentary on oppression, particularly in Peru, led me to think about differently about South America and world geopolitics. I don't know much about Che Guevara, and the book didn't really provide much more on that topic, regardless. I do appreciate the fact that he didn't change his original motorcycle diaries after the fact in order to stay true to the original text and adventure.

  • Che was more than just a face on a hippy’s T-shirt. He was more than just a revolutionary. This book is the recollection of a young man who was searching for adventure only to come upon horrible inequality which helped shaped his view as the man he would become in the future. Che was a brilliant and eloquent writer. I’ve been told by some of my Spanish speaking professors that the book is a bit lost in translation but I think not.

    You do not have to be a leftist or a history student to read this. This book is simply the journals of a traveling young man.

  • I loved this book for many reasons, and strongly recommend it. It attracted me because I have just traveled to Cuba, and had been to many of the other countries and places listed in this book. The idea of a man getting up one day with a close friend and spontaneously deciding to set off on a continental motorcycle tour was also appealing because of the adventure and travel aspects. This book exceeded all the expectations I had for it. Che Guevara’s writing style is unlike anything i had read before. The artful, beautiful way he describes everything from landscapes to his patients makes the reader feel like they are living the experiences he is, sometimes in a deeper way than the reader may have experienced themselves. Che dives into each topic or picture he sees with great emotion and personal opinion while at the same time leaving some space for the readers opinions and ideas to take form. You get the historical sense of what is being observed, with facts provided (the architechture and stories behind the churches in Lima and Cuzco) while at the same time getting Che's somewhat romanticized take on it. There is a great amount of action- (for example the dog scene, the boat scene, and motorcycle breakdowns), contrasted with the demonstration of the social problems of Latin America (racism, poverty, indecent health care). It is fascinating to see Che develop as a social being, and to see how he transforms from a freshly graduated medical student to an iconic revolutionary, while also seeing the primary discussions evolve from strictly landscapes to issues and people stories much like HONY. I read this book for an english class assignment, and have already found myself recommending it to others multiple times. I think its interesting to have read if you are following USA/Cuba relations right now.

  • This book was very entertaining and there is much to learn from these 2 young souls who ventured on such a dangerous journey. I just started riding motorcycles 1 year ago and this was a recommendation from a co-worker. I admire the bravery that these men had and their enthusiasm to travel their continent. However, I wish he would not have gotten so much into the political side of things and that he would have focused more on the humanitarian side. He does show his growing interest in military strategy. Overall, I would read this again in the future.

  • I really enjoyed this book. It was interesting to read how what started out as a college student's adventure had so much of a profound effect on Che that the journey completely altered the course of his life. The high point of the book was his observations of Macchu Pichu and Cuzco and his observations on the relations between the indigenous peoples and those of Spanish heritage today, or at least fairly recent times. He also provided a good historical, political, and cultural background to the usual travel writer's observations about the countries he visited and traveled through.

  • Interesting perspective on some of the formative years of Che and life in South American during the early 20th century. Good perspective on some of that idealism that humanity had during the age of modernism. Interesting to see someone attempt to reconcile the mind and feelings into one human experience. This reconciliation stands in stark contrast to the life of feelings worshiped by post modern youth today. A great window into an interesting life!

  • This must have been quite a journey and an adventure for a young man. It certainly changed Guevara's perspective on life and government.
    Guevara writes in simple, but elegant prose. He does a good job describing small details of the people he encounters that give the reader a greater understanding of their culture. One can understand the why of Guevara's later beliefs.
    For me this was an enjoyable and interesting short read.