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ePub 12,000 Miles in the Nick of Time: A Semi-Dysfunctional Family Circumnavigates the Globe (An Evergreen book) download

by Mark Jacobson

ePub 12,000 Miles in the Nick of Time: A Semi-Dysfunctional Family Circumnavigates the Globe (An Evergreen book) download
Author:
Mark Jacobson
ISBN13:
978-0802141385
ISBN:
0802141382
Language:
Publisher:
Grove Press; 1st Thus. edition (March 17, 2004)
Category:
Subcategory:
Writing Research & Publishing Guides
ePub file:
1687 kb
Fb2 file:
1264 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
406

12,000 Miles should inspire wanderlust in all those who ever have taken any sort of a journey, or even contemplated one, but this isn't really a travel book.

12,000 Miles should inspire wanderlust in all those who ever have taken any sort of a journey, or even contemplated one, but this isn't really a travel book. It's not even an adventure travel book, though the Jacobsons certainly had some harrowing and mind-blowing encounters during their three months abroad

12000 Miles in the Nick of Time is about traveling quick over a great distance in the midst of a crisis - in this case, an emergency of the heart

12000 Miles in the Nick of Time is about traveling quick over a great distance in the midst of a crisis - in this case, an emergency of the heart. Author Mark Jacobson and his wife, Nancy Bray Cardozo, decided that their family - the three kids and two parents - had reached a mutual moment of decision. Things were tense in the house.

A Semi-Dysfunctional Family Circumnavigates the Globe (An Evergreen book). Published March 17, 2004 by Grove Press. There's no description for this book yet. It's not even an adventure travel book, though the Jacobsons certainly had some harrowing and mind-blowing encounters during their three months abroad

At the end of the last millennium, noted journalist Mark Jacobson and his wife, Nancy, decided that their three children, Rae (sixteen), Rosalie (twelve), and Billy (nine), had become prisoners of the idiot culture.

At the end of the last millennium, noted journalist Mark Jacobson and his wife, Nancy, decided that their three children, Rae (sixteen), Rosalie (twelve), and Billy (nine), had become prisoners of the idiot culture, which seemed a terrible waste of perfectly fine DNA. There was only one recourse: to declare war. To get away, far away. To go around the world. 12,000 Miles in the Nick of Time is the story of this three-month trip

of Time : A Semi-Dysfunctional Family Circumnavigates the Globe. A family comedy reminiscent of The Osbournes, Jacobson's odyssey is also a wider journey.

12,000 Miles in the Nick of Time : A Semi-Dysfunctional Family Circumnavigates the Globe.

American Gangster was published by Atlantic in 2007 and has been made into a major motion picture.

A Semi-Dysfunctional Family Circumnavigates the Globe. A Brooklyn-based journalist and novelist (Everyone and No One, 1997, et. takes his family on an exceptionally tedious global adventure

A Semi-Dysfunctional Family Circumnavigates the Globe. takes his family on an exceptionally tedious global adventure.

Mark Jacobson is the author of several books including the novels Gojiro and Everyone and No One. His nonfiction books include 12,000 Miles in the Nick of Time: A Semi-Dysfunctional Family Circumnavigates the Globe, and. His nonfiction books include 12,000 Miles in the Nick of Time: A Semi-Dysfunctional Family Circumnavigates the Globe, and the recent Teenage Hipster in the Modern World. He was born and lives in New York City

His nonfiction books include 12,000 Miles in the Nick of Time: A Semi-Dysfunctional Family Circumnavigates the Globe, and the recent Teenage Hipster in the Modern World

His nonfiction books include 12,000 Miles in the Nick of Time: A Semi-Dysfunctional Family Circumnavigates the Globe, and the recent Teenage Hipster in the Modern World. He was born and lives in New York City.

12000 Miles in the Nick of Time is about traveling quick over a great distance in the midst of a crisis--in this case, an emergency of the heart. Author Mark Jacobson and his wife, Nancy Bray Cardozo, decided that their family--the three kids and two parents--had reached a mutual moment of decision. Things were tense in the house. Their precocious, darling oldest daughter Rae was raging through teenagehood, staying out late, flunking out of school. The other two, Rosalie and Billy, teenagers-in-training, were spending way too much time in front of the TV. This desultory equation, the parents thought, in their admittedly slapdash way, could only be changed by the introduction of something radical, something big. The World was big. The World was radical. The World would get everyone's attention. To the World they would go, and too bad about the cries and whines of der kinder. It would be FOR THEIR OWN GOOD. So they went, on their particular baedeker, a journey into what the parents surmised would constitute a touch of The Real: Thailand, Cambodia, India (dementedly, the parents actually believed the kids would really like Varanasi, where Hindu pilgrims bring the bodies of their dead relatives to burned on massive pyres, the ashes tossed into the River Ganges), Nepal, the deserts of Jordan, Cairo, the soon-to-be seething streets of Jerusalem, and eventually Paris and London.12,000 Miles should inspire wanderlust in all those who ever have taken any sort of a journey, or even contemplated one, but this isn't really a travel book. It's not even an adventure travel book, though the Jacobsons certainly had some harrowing and mind-blowing encounters during their three months abroad. 12,000 Miles is about another kind of travel, about remembering who your family is and how you all got that way. It is about journeying through the often impersonal, frightening, dangerous universe with the people who, for better or worse, share your DNA, experiences, memories, and dreams. It is about the spaces that exist in between you and the people you love, how they sometimes grow too great, and how distances can be closed, simply by reaching out and taking the time to look at each other, sometimes in the most remote of locales. This is the story of an American family.A family comedy reminiscent of The Osbournes, Jacobson's odyssey is also a wider journey. A story about parenting-stretching across generations, an expedition into the minds of five family members as they make their way through a succession of cramped cars, 17-hour train rides, seemingly endless walks through teeming metropolises-and one more bowl of curry.Fueled by Jacobson's trademark mix of candor and sincerity (and by his own daughter Rae's commentary, who has her say in a "Talkback" section) 12,000 Miles in the Nick of Time is a rollicking journey across the globe and a sincere attempt for Jacobson to make sense of his own existential position as: The Dad.
  • I liked the idea of this book -- take your kids around the world and reconnect as a family, while opening everyone's eyes to the world around them. I liked the book, but not for the reasons I expected to.

    The Jacobson parents decide to take the three kids on a round-the-world trip for three months when the kids are in their teens. The kids resist, but end up going. The family does seem stronger after the trip.

    The trip consisted of places the parents had visited in the past, when they were earnest counterculture humanities students. Lots of third world, poverty-stricken, overpopulated cities. I can't say how much the kids got out of places like that, but it certainly made them stick close together for safety. And they were really glad to get back home.

    The best parts of 12,000 Miles were the chapters written by the daughter, Rae. Even though she was going through some rough times as a teenager in New York, she still seemed more together than her father. And I'll bet twenty years from now, she doesn't drag her kids through filth-infested streets trying to save them from the horrors of television.

  • My family is planning a trip to Thailand and India next year. Although my eldest daughter has traveled to India 4 times, I still wanted to get an idea about what to expect while traveling with 3 children to southeast Asia. I really loved Jacobson's style of writing. I think I also enjoyed this book because Jacobson sees the world so much like I do. (It's always nice to feel validated.) In fact if he wasn't married I'd look him up and ask him for a date!

    I had read two other family travel books and didn't laugh as much nor did I feel as satisfied. This travel book is not just about the Jacobson families 3 month journey. It is also about Mark Jacobson's life journey and life memories and his struggle with his teenage daughter. His daughter also writes brief chapters which I found very well written and interesting.

  • i really enjoyed this book, mark jacobson is down to earth and funny. reading about his experiences with his children felt very open and honest, i really felt the intensity of emotions when he described how his relationship changed with his older daughter. i have two daughters and i can see how bittersweet their growing up has been and will continue to be. this was a funny account of his trip and also an emotional ride about being a parent, i loved this book.

  • I am half-way through 12,000 miles in the Nick of Time and have lost a lot of my drive to finish the book. I purchased this story because I had recently returned from Nepal, and while there visited several of the sites Mark Jacobson describes. I expected more of a description of the cultural sites and less family history. Perhaps this is of interest to some but it was uninteresting to me and has gone on ad nauseum. I believe Jacobson over sensationalizes or exaggerates the description of his surroundings. Granted sensations are in the mind of the beholder, but I think this book is for people that have not traveled extensively and are easily caught up in hyperbole.
    Also as a resident of South Dakota and an employee of the Federal Government, I'd like to know where in the SD Badlands he and his family dug for fossils. This is against the law on USFS and NPS land. He also needs to review or research a little more the definitions of place names. For example Ghorapani, Nepal means "Horse Water" not "Cold Water".