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ePub On Writing the Short Story download

by Hallie Burnett

ePub On Writing the Short Story download
Author:
Hallie Burnett
ISBN13:
978-0062731746
ISBN:
0062731742
Language:
Publisher:
Perennial (January 1, 1993)
Category:
Subcategory:
Writing Research & Publishing Guides
ePub file:
1782 kb
Fb2 file:
1725 kb
Other formats:
mobi lrf mobi lit
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
660

I was disappointed with On Writing the Short Story.

Wherever you ar ein your developent as a writier, "On Writing the Short Story" can help you focus your creativity more productively. I was disappointed with On Writing the Short Story. They indicated this was one of the best books out there about short stories.

Burnett, Hallie Southgate, 1908-.

In her forward, Hallie writes: . .I have written a book which I hope and believe will express Whit's own very personal feelings, when he was alive, on the art and craft of fiction writing-the short story and the novel. I recommend Fiction Writer's handbook to writers. Examples of writing are given by Hallie, most coming from STORY magazine. A few lines from the book: - "Whit said an author's needs are simple

Practical advice on evry aspect of short story writing with classics examples of the form originally pubishes in Story magazine.

Practical advice on evry aspect of short story writing with classics examples of the form originally pubishes in Story magazine. Offers practical tips on all facets of writing a short story, discussing plot, character and motivation, stages of story writing, rewriting, criticism, acceptance, and more.

The Burnetts also operated Story Press, a book-publishing concern. Story magazine closed down in 1971, and Whitney Burnett died two years later. She also wrote a number of textbooks, including "On Writing a Short Story," which was published in 1983. In 1977, Mrs. Burnett married William Zeisel, who died in 1980. Wrotes Novels and Textbooks. Mrs. Burnett, whose family name was Southgate, had little formal schooling in her native St. Louis. She spent a good deal of time at colleges as the daughter and niece of trustees. She was married in the 1930's to Robert Abbott, a college teacher, but the marriage ended in divorce.

1966, director Story’s College Creative Awards Contest, 1966-1971. A Story Anthology, 1933, Story in America, 1934. The Flying Yorkshireman, novellas, 1937. Two Bottles of Relish, a book of strange stories, 1942. The Seas of God, great stories of the human spirit, 1944. Time To Be Young, 1945. The Story Pocket Book, 1945.

In the 1940s, Story was an important magazine in that it published the first or early works of many writers who went on to become major authors.

12 Books Every Aspiring Author Should Read. A short course in mistakes to avoid while writing, it’ll remind you why you wanted to be an author. 1. The Writing Life: Writers on How They Think and Work. This book came from ten years of Ms. Arana’s Washington Post Book World column. Then, especially if you want to be a novelist, read Dean Koontz’s How to Write Bestselling Fiction.

This comprehensive book on the art of novel and short story writing is packed with advice and instruction from best-selling authors and writing experts like Nancy Kress, Elizabeth Sims, Hallie Ephron, . Kelby, Heather Sellers, and Donald Maass, plus a foreword by James Scott Bell. You'll learn invaluable skills for mastering every area of the craft: Define and refine your characters. Make your plot and conflict high-energy and intense. Hone your story's point of view. Create a rich setting and backstory. Craft dialogue that rings true.

He then added approximately fifty more items, which either were written expressly for this book or were taken from . 4. I don’t know: Preface, Fiction Writer’s Handbook, by Hallie and Whit Burnett (New York: Harper and Row, 1975) xvii–xxi.

He then added approximately fifty more items, which either were written expressly for this book or were taken from the transcripts of unpublished interviews or forums on writing. In all but a few instances, he has incorporated the questions of his interviewers in his replies. 5. That is the best: Personal interview, Larry Shainberg, 10 and 17 March 2002, Provincetown, Massachusetts.

Offers practical tips on all facets of writing a short story, discussing plot, character and motivation, stages of story writing, rewriting, criticism, acceptance, and more
  • On Writing the Short Story by Hallie Burnett (1983) is a companion to her earlier book in 1975, Fiction Writer's Handbook (with Whit Burnett listed as co-author although he died in 1973). Some of the material overlaps. The format of On Writing the Short Story is similar to her previous book with tips and thoughts on writing followed by excerpts from short stories. Both books by Hallie Burnett are excellent. On Writing the Short Story concludes with six short stories in their entirety. All stories appeared in STORY magazine which was edited by Hallie and her husband Whit Burnett (and co-founded by Whit and Martha Foley in 1931). Hallie Burnett died on September 4, 1991. The contents of On Writing the Short Story:
    -- A Minor Introduction by Hallie Burnett
    -- What is a Short Story? What Makes a Story Writer?
    -- The Search for a Story to Tell: Memory and Plot
    -- Characters
    -- Style
    -- Work and the Writer
    -- The Stages of a Story: Beginning
    -- The Stages of a Story: Continuing to the End
    -- The Final Stages
    -- Selling: Becoming a Professional
    -- The Proof of the Pudding: Six Stories
    "Address Unknown" by Kressmann Taylor
    "My Side of the Matter" Truman Capote
    "The Important Thing" by Tennessee Williams
    "Sawdust" by Arthur Foff
    "The Thief on the Champs Elysees" by Hallie Burnett
    "Indian Summer" by Erskine Caldwell

  • This book is about the art of writing. I have read a number of books on how to write fiction, and this one has a unique approach. Hallie Burnett uses a quote from Carl G. Jung about fascination and how it relates to the development of talent. I'm a psychologist who has read some of Jung's work and I've never come across this explanation. Burnett has not only understands the fundamentals of what it means to write on the level of art, she can convey it to the reader. She is one of those rare people who can do and teach.

  • I've read so many books on writing ,it was mostly repetitive. I loved the way it was written though and enjoyed reading it. Probably wouldn't recommend it to anyone but a novice.

  • I have been reading a variety of creative writing manuals over the past few months to gear up for my workshopping, writing, teaching, and learning that I will be doing in my new MFA program. All of the books I have read have been mostly repetitive, while all offered interesting and powerful glimmers into one aspect of creative writing that really turned me on and opened my eyes (while I felt the other lessons provided were good, but mostly repeated a great deal of information I was already very familiar with). This review will focus on what I felt was specifically unique about this book in particular and may leave out observations about the entirety of the workshop.

    This was one of the least helpful of the group that I have been reading recently. It is rambling, indirect, and contains very little valuable information. It is written in a narrative format that seems to dance around any helpful advice, and felt to me like one of those college classes where an elderly professor is sitting at the front of the room and is riffing on their topic without a real distinct goal for the day’s class as far as anyone can tell. Half of the book is her ‘course’ and the other half of the book is a very small anthology of notable short stories that were published in Story magazine.

    That said, I was surprised at how poorly executed this book was as Burnett was the editor of Story magazine for something like thirty years… But that does not a good teacher through a nonfiction book on creative writing make. As a matter of fact, I really enjoyed her piece that appeared in the book – yes, she put one of her own short stories next to Capote, Taylor, and others as an editorial decision in her book. But there was no clear reason why the stories were there besides the fact that they were great.

    All in all, there are a few tips in here hidden in a bramble of anecdotal nonsense, but it is safe to say you can skip it if you want to learn something about creative writing. Pick up ‘On Writing’ or ‘Writing Down The Bones’ or even some inspiration from some back issues of Story to kickstart your adventure, but you can feel free to leave this one on the shelf.