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ePub Round Ireland in Low Gear download

by Eric Newby

ePub Round Ireland in Low Gear download
Author:
Eric Newby
ISBN13:
978-0864426277
ISBN:
0864426275
Language:
Publisher:
Lonely Planet; Us edition (October 1, 1998)
Category:
Subcategory:
Writing Research & Publishing Guides
ePub file:
1193 kb
Fb2 file:
1609 kb
Other formats:
rtf mobi azw docx
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
106

Originally published in 1987, Newby's Round Ireland in Low Gear has been reprinted with new maps by Lonely Planet Publications. This is not a manic tale of some bicycling marathon, but rather a journey-and a book-paced for enjoyment.

Originally published in 1987, Newby's Round Ireland in Low Gear has been reprinted with new maps by Lonely Planet Publications. Funny, revealing and thoroughly enjoyable' - Irish Independent.

Sunday in Ireland’, Selected Poems, 1948 The whitewashed cottage we were to stay in (looking at it no one would have guessed that it was built with breeze blocks), at which Wanda had. already arrived in Tom’s car, with her bike strapped precariously on top, had a thatched roof and a green front door with a top and bottom part. That could be opened separately so that if you opened the bottom and kept the top closed, or vice versa, you looked from the outside as if you had been sawn in half

Newby, Eric - Travel - Ireland, Cycling - Ireland, Ireland - Description and travel.

Newby, Eric - Travel - Ireland, Cycling - Ireland, Ireland - Description and travel. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Kahle/Austin Foundation. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on August 21, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

ГлавнаяХобби, РемеслаEric NewbyRound Ireland in Low Gear. Уменьшить шрифт (-) Увеличить шрифт (+). Eric Newby Round Ireland in Low Gear. Round Ireland in Low Gear.

To avoid other tourists, Eric Newby had decided that the depths of winter would be the very best time to explore Ireland by mountain bike. More astonishing still, he managed to persuade Wanda, his long-suffering wife and life-long co-traveller, to accompany him – mainly, she admitted, to 'keep him out of trouble'. Lashed by winter storms, fuelled by Guinness and warmed by thermal underwear, their panniers laden with antique books on Ireland, the elderly adventurers cycle the highways and byways, encountering hospitable locals, swaying saints and ferocious dogs.

Start by marking Round Ireland in Low Gear as Want to Read . It's not enough that Newby rides a mountain bike packed with books clocking in at nearly 100 pounds, but they also do it despite gale force winds in Irish winter. I've been in Ireland in winter. I remember the winds.

Start by marking Round Ireland in Low Gear as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Eric Newby - ( 6. Dezember 1919 Hammersmith Bridge in London; † 20. Oktober 2006 in Guildford) war ein englischer Schriftsteller und Autor von Reiseliteratur und Reiseführern.

Having decided to explore Ireland by bicycle, Eric and Wanda Newby set out one December - not the best .

Having decided to explore Ireland by bicycle, Eric and Wanda Newby set out one December - not the best time to ride a bike around the highways and by-ways of the Emerald Isle, even when protected by thermal underwear. From the Cliffs of Moher to St Brigid's Vat, Dublin, the Aran Islands, the Ring of Kerry and Croagh Patrick, their rain-soaked journey is beset by minor disasters ranging from ferocious storms to even more ferocious dogs. More astonishing still, he managed to persuade Wanda, his long-suffering wife and life-long co-traveller, to accompany him - mainly, she admitted, to 'keep him out of trouble'. Books related to Round Ireland in Low Gear.

Having decided to explore Ireland by bicycle, Eric and Wanda Newby set out one December - not the best time to ride a bike around the highways and by-ways of the Emerald Isle, even when protected by thermal underwear. From the Cliffs of Moher to St Brigid's Vat, Dublin, the Aran Islands, the Ring of Kerry and Croagh Patrick, their rain-soaked journey is beset by minor disasters ranging from ferocious storms to even more ferocious dogs. Along the way they come across a moving, miracle-working statue of the Virgin, spectacular ruins and the traces of twentieth-century violence, in between stops for Guiness, tea and soda bread. Woven into the narrative is a wealth of information around Irish history and custom - hermits, horse-fairs, peat-cutting and poetry are all touched on in this deft and dazzling blend of myth, fact and quirky details. And, as usual with Eric Newby, this beguiling account is enlivened by a cast of eccentric and utterly engaging characters.
  • The author and his wife, sexagenarians both, took four tours of Ireland in one year in the 1980s, mainly by bicycle. The author has no inclination to conceal his rather acerbic personality, so you may find yourself rooting for the trucks early on. But keep reading, there's many a worthwhile nugget awaiting, and it's easy enough to discard the refuse. By page 291, when the author or his editors or the Lonely Planet reprinters get the spelling of "fuchsia" right on the fourth attempt, you will feel that anything is possible. So when the author cuts short his description of the final leg, decides not to undertake a planned trip to Northern Ireland, and leaves the book in its present rather untrim state, you're apt to feel a considerable sadness.
    The maps provided by Lonely Planet add value to this edition.

  • Eric Newby is one of those writers that once you stumble upon him, you look for everything else he has written. This book was a hoot, plus it is one of best historical accounts of Ireland I have ever read. Just to accomplish riding a bike around this island at the age of 70+ is a feat unto itself.
    I'm a bike rider, mostly off road, but after reading this I intend to get to Ireland some day and follow his route. I will do it in a more welcoming season though. How anyone could have done what he did is a testament to this man's moxie! Read his "Love and War in the Apennines". While in a prision of war camp, you will find out how he met Wanda, the woman who would later become his wife and travel companion. From 1942 until 1945 he was held prisoner of war near Parma, Italy. During a brief escape he was hidden by a Slovenian family.
    The description of the country is amazing. A great non-fictionional story not to be missed. A different style of travel writer who leaves behind many books for us to daydream of places we have never seen.

  • If you want to see Ireland without leaving the coffee in the kitchen, there's no better way than reading Mr. Newby;s book on his travels to the more obscure parts of the old country, warts and all. And don't forget the comments of his loving wife,
    wanda.

  • Newby's my favourite travel writer, and his Irish expeditions are a mix of history and personal endurance. Phrases like 'Hermetically-sealed pubs' stay with me, years later. I've probably bought six copies of this book, as I foolishly keep lending favourite books to friends.

  • It’s a good book for anyone planning a visit to Ireland, particularly the west and southwest of the Emerald Isle. Even better if you’re planning to ride ya bike there!

  • Travel in laughter. travel for life. check it out
    I plan to follow this path around the isle of green one day

  • I've enjoyed all the Newby travel books I've read, but I'll confess I was a little disappointed with this adventure. The classic Newby formula of amusing misadventures, historical anecdotes, and of course lots of colourful characters is on tour in Ireland. Eric and Wanda Newby make the almost unbelievable decision to cycle round large parts of Ireland in the winter. There are some brilliant descriptions of the weather, the people and the countryside. However I think the book suffered from too much detail, it seemed like every crossroad or country path they wandered down was described in almost painful detail.
    A good travel book captures my interest and attention by drawing me in, making me want to go there, to experience the place. The prospect of wet and sometimes miserable rides put a huge damper on the whole experience of the adventure.
    There is a lot to enjoy in this book, perhaps too much. Just don't book your winter flight before reading this book.

  • I've enjoyed all of Eric Newby's books, and I found this one just as entertaining and amusing as his others. But given the Irish weather this is not the kind of book that makes you want to replicate what the author suffered through. I'm just glad he did it and wrote about it so I don't have to. I'm a travel writer myself so I know that miserable experiences often make for the best writing afterwards. 'It'll make good copy' is something writers tell each other when things are tough. In that case, Eric Newby must have been telling himself that, all the way round Ireland.