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by Llewellyn Brown,Marc-Alain Ouaknin

ePub The Burnt Book download
Author:
Llewellyn Brown,Marc-Alain Ouaknin
ISBN13:
978-0691059204
ISBN:
0691059209
Language:
Publisher:
Princeton University Press; Reprint edition (May 11, 1998)
Category:
Subcategory:
Judaism
ePub file:
1942 kb
Fb2 file:
1850 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
743

Marc-Alain Ouaknin (born March 5, 1957, in Paris), both a rabbi and a philosopher . The Burnt Book: Reading the Talmud, translation by Llewellyn Brown of Le livre brûlé, Lire le Talmud, Princeton University Press (1995).

Marc-Alain Ouaknin (born March 5, 1957, in Paris), both a rabbi and a philosopher, he is the son of Rabbi Jacques Ouaknin (b. 1932, Marrakesh, Morocco) and Eliane Erlich Ouaknin (b. 1932, Lille; d. 2007, Marseille. His father is the Grand Rabbi of the French cities of Reims, Lille, Metz and Marseille. Ouaknin dedicated his best-known work, The Burnt Book, to "my father, my master, Grand Rabbi Jacques Ouaknin.

For Marc-Alain Ouaknin, the burnt book recalls the immolations of Talmud at the hands of church authorities in Paris .

For Marc-Alain Ouaknin, the burnt book recalls the immolations of Talmud at the hands of church authorities in Paris in 1242, in Rome in 1552, and burnings of Jewish books in our century; but that is not all. It also recalls the sixteenth chapter of the Babylonian Talmud, tractate Shabbat, which asks, "Which books, when burning in a fire on the sabbath, may be rescued?" . Ouaknin has given us a fresh insight into the process of Jewish Reading in The Burnt Book: Reading the Talmud, a volume which is of benefit to the novice in Jewish classical texts as well as to the seasoned scholar.

This remarkable book. The gifts Ouaknin offers are many.

Marc-Alain Ouaknin, Llewellyn Brown (Translator). In a profound look at what it means for new generations to read and interpret ancient religious texts, rabbi and philosopher Marc-Alain Ouaknin offers a postmodern reading of the Talmud, one of the first of its kind.

The Burnt Book represents the innovative thinking that has come to be associated with a school of French Jewish studies, headed by Lévinas and dedicated to new . Перевод: Llewellyn Brown.

The Burnt Book represents the innovative thinking that has come to be associated with a school of French Jewish studies, headed by Lévinas and dedicated to new readings of traditional texts, which is fast gaining influence in the United States. The Talmud, transcribed in 500 . is shown to be a text that refrains from dogma and instead encourages the exploration of its meanings. Издание: иллюстрированное, перепечатанное, исправленное.

His best-known book in the English-speaking world is:

Marc-Alain Ouaknin - 1998. Who Thinks in the Talmud? Sergey Dolgopolski - 2012 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 20 (1):1-34. Buddhist Conceptual Rhyming and .

J. Borel - 1994 - Revue de Théologie Et de Philosophie 126:402. Marc-Alain Ouaknin - 1998. Eliot's Crisis of Connection in TheWaste Land and 'Burnt Norton'. Tim Bruno - 2013 - Asian Philosophy 23 (4):365 - 378. A Sense of Duty.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Llewellyn Brown books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. 19% off. A Classical Vet in Modern Times.

The Burnt Book: Reading the Talmud. Marc-Alain Ouaknin, Llewellyn Brown. to read and interpret ancient religious texts, rabbi and philosopher Marc-Alain Ouaknin offers a postmodern reading of the Talmud, one of the. In a profound look at what it means for new generations to read and interpret ancient religious texts, rabbi and philosopher Marc-Alain Ouaknin offers a postmodern reading of the Talmud, one of th. More).

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The Burnt Book: Reading the Talmud by. .Additional Product Features. Translated by. Llewellyn Brown.

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In a profound look at what it means for new generations to read and interpret ancient religious texts, rabbi and philosopher Marc-Alain Ouaknin offers a postmodern reading of the Talmud, one of the first of its kind. Combining traditional learning and contemporary thought, Ouaknin dovetails discussions of spirituality and religious practice with such concepts as deconstruction, intertextuality, undecidability, multiple voicing, and eroticism in the Talmud. On a broader level, he establishes a dialogue between Hebrew tradition and the social sciences, which draws, for example, on the works of Lévinas, Blanchot, and Jabès as well as Derrida. The Burnt Book represents the innovative thinking that has come to be associated with a school of French Jewish studies, headed by Lévinas and dedicated to new readings of traditional texts, which is fast gaining influence in the United States.

The Talmud, transcribed in 500 C.E., is shown to be a text that refrains from dogma and instead encourages the exploration of its meanings. A vast compilation of Jewish oral law, the Talmud also contains rabbinical commentaries that touch on everything from astronomy to household life. Examining its literary methods and internal logic, Ouaknin explains how this text allows readers to transcend its authority in that it invites them to interpret, discuss, and re-create their religious tradition. An in-depth treatment of selected texts from the oral law and commentary goes on to provide a model for secular study of the Talmud in light of contemporary philosophical issues.

Throughout the author emphasizes the self-effacing quality of a text whose worth can be measured by the insights that live on in the minds of its interpreters long after they have closed the book. He points out that the burning of the Talmud in anti-Judaic campaigns throughout history has, in fact, been an unwitting act of complicity with Talmudic philosophy and the practice of self-effacement. Ouaknin concludes his discussion with the story of the Hasidic master Rabbi Nahman of Bratslav, who himself burned his life achievement--a work known by his students as "the Burnt Book." This story leaves us with the question, should all books be destroyed in order to give birth to thought and renew meaning?