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by Judah Landa

ePub Torah and Science download
Author:
Judah Landa
ISBN13:
978-0881253207
ISBN:
0881253200
Language:
Publisher:
Ktav Pub & Distributors Inc (November 1, 1991)
Category:
Subcategory:
Judaism
ePub file:
1339 kb
Fb2 file:
1717 kb
Other formats:
mbr docx mobi lit
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
904

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Find nearly any book by Judah Landa. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers . ISBN 9781936803033 (978-1-936803-03-3) Softcover, Hakirah, 2012. Find signed collectible books: 'Hakirah: The Flatbush Journal of Jewish Law and Thought (Volume 14)'.

Scientific discoveries have posed a challenge to traditional religion ever since the Renaissance. This is especially true of the last century, when the pace and extent of scientific activity has grown by leaps and bounds. One result of this unprecedented development is the widespread perception that traditional understandings of religion are no longer valid. Traditionalist interpretations of Jewish teaching have fared no better in this regard.

Judah emerged as an operational kingdom somewhat later than Israel . According to the Book of Maccabees, many Jews were not happy with the way Hellenism had spread into Judea. Some of these Jews were Mattathias and his sons.

Judah emerged as an operational kingdom somewhat later than Israel, probably during the 9th century BCE, but the subject is one of considerable controversy. There are indications that during the 10th and 9th centuries BCE, the southern highlands had been divided between a number of centres, none with clear primacy. Mattathias refused to offer sacrifice when the king told him to.

Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780881253207.

Judah's independence was expressed in the law-code in the Book of Deuteronomy, written as a treaty between Judah and . Biblical archaeology.

Judah's independence was expressed in the law-code in the Book of Deuteronomy, written as a treaty between Judah and Yahweh to replace the vassal-treaty with Assyria. The Babylonian exile and Second Temple Judaism.

Torah (/ˈtɔːrə, ˈtoʊrə/; Hebrew: תּוֹרָה, "Instruction", "Teaching" or "Law") has a range of meanings. It can most specifically mean the first five books (Pentateuch or five books of Moses) of the 24 books of the Tanakh. It can most specifically mean the first five books (Pentateuch or five books of Moses) of the 24 books of the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible). This is commonly known as the Written Torah.

The book is concerned with the internal life of people, with universal themes of commonality, does not, generally, posit a vertical conception of. .

The book is concerned with the internal life of people, with universal themes of commonality, does not, generally, posit a vertical conception of God, but a panentheistic one. The Sefer Emet does what every true Torah book should do: it takes tradition as the jumping off point to greater explorations of the theme of Judaism in its own time. It adds novel twists to old traditions. And Green is an excellent guide.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. Категория: Техника, Строительство. 5 Mb. The Damascus Document: A Centennial of Discovery : Proceedings of the Third International Symposium of the Orion Center for the Study of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Associated Literature, 4-8 February, 1998 (Studies of the Texts of the Desert of Judah).

Torah refers to the five books of Moses which are known in Hebrew as Chameesha Choomshey Torah. These are: Bresheit (Genesis), Shemot (Exodus), Vayicra (Leviticus), Bamidbar (Numbers), and Devarim (Deuteronomy). Jews believe that God dictated the Torah to Moses on Mount Sinai 50 days after their exodus from Egyptian slavery. Similarly, the term Torah is sometimes used in a more general sense to incorporate Judaism’s written and oral law. This definition encompasses Jewish scripture in its entirety including all authoritative Jewish religious teachings throughout history. The word Torah has various meanings in English.

Scientific discoveries have posed a challenge to traditional religion ever since the Renaissance. This is especially true of the last century, when the pace and extent of scientific activity has grown by leaps and bounds. One result of this unprecedented development is the widespread perception that traditional understandings of religion are no longer valid.Traditionalist interpretations of Jewish teaching have fared no better in this regard. Most of those outside the Orthodox camp have convinced themselves that fundamental Orthodox dogmas - and the practices based on obsolete ideas of nature - must be compromised in order to bring Judaism into the modern age.Written for non-scientists, Torah and Science carefully, methodically, and succinctly presents a clear description of what science claims to know in the areas of perceived conflict - and the ideas those claims are based on.In addition, the author examines the words of the Torah and our sages regarding the nature of the world and the rules that govern it. He concludes that the fundamentals of Judaism, when properly viewed, have nothing to fear from modern science.
  • Specific questions you might have aren't likely to be answered or even mentioned here, unless you are in "seminary" or Yeshiva. The material centers on the technical (its fascinating and revealing in the Rabbis' conception of the cosmos), not the philosophical. It is was already dated when it was written (redshift and other evidences for the Big Bang had already been public by then), particularly in his discussion of Bereshis; he presupposes that the Big Gang theory is not the dominant conception of the universe, and then wastes an entire chapter on defending convoluted interpretations of Chazzal and torah to the end that the universe is eternal! In this even, he ignores the work done in the 80's around the manuscripts of the Tiferes Yisroel, who suggested cycles of creation on the earth. Better discussions of extraterrestrial life are found in Lamm's essay in "Challenge". I would only recommend it if you are a Ben or Bat Torah who has technical doubts about perceptions presented in Talmud or Tanach. Anyone else, aside from mathematicians or physicists ( probably curious about what they missed after being Bar Mitvah), will be bored.

  • The other reviews here make me think there must be two books by this title, but all the details of authorship and publication match up with the one I am holding. Landa does _not_ present the Sages of the Talmud as scientific experts anticipating the discoveries of today. On the contrary, his repeated point is that the Talmud and other classic works of Jewish religious thought and law contain many scientific mistakes. When compared, not only to contemporary scientists, but to the natural philosophers of their own times, our Sages do not seem to have been particularly well-versed in scientific fact or method. Landa argues that this should not shock anyone because our Sages, though wise and good men, were only human and science was not their major interest. Therefore, he argues, an Orthodox Jew need not try to reconcile Talmudic statements with contemporary scientific ones. There should be no religious problem in just accepting that the Talmud (and the Rambam, etc.) are sometimes simply mistaken on questions of how nature works.

  • As a scholar of Talmud myself, I believe that Dr. Judah Landa has done a superb job presenting the link between the Torah and modern physics/astronomy. It was interesting to learn just how accurate the Rabbis of yore in their predictions about the universe. I did not think even the ancient Greeks were capable of such calculations, but our wise forefathers certainly were! I give Dr. Landa a thumbs-up for this fine piece of Jewish-scientific work.