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ePub Narrating the Law: A Poetics of Talmudic Legal Stories (Divinations: Rereading Late Ancient Religion) download

by Barry Scott Wimpfheimer

ePub Narrating the Law: A Poetics of Talmudic Legal Stories (Divinations: Rereading Late Ancient Religion) download
Author:
Barry Scott Wimpfheimer
ISBN13:
978-0812242997
ISBN:
0812242998
Language:
Publisher:
University of Pennsylvania Press (February 1, 2011)
Category:
Subcategory:
Judaism
ePub file:
1232 kb
Fb2 file:
1180 kb
Other formats:
docx mobi lit doc
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
758

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. student at Yale University -The Blog for the Center of Jewish Law.

Barry Wimpfheimer argues that scholars’ emphasis on the Talmud’s purely le gal pericopae and their relative inattention to its narrative stories obscures the Bavli’s true literary and substantive richness. Scholarship’s focus on statutory law, always viewed as the Talmud’s main concern, has meant insufficient mining of the evidence for rabbinic society and culture that, in Wimpfheimer’s view, is preserved in the document’s legal narratives.

Other books in the series. Divinations: Rereading Late Ancient Religion (1 - 10 of 39 books). Books by Barry Scott Wimpfheimer.

Oct 31, 2017 Elizabeth Pyjov rated it it was amazing. Other books in the series.

Barry Scott Wimpfheimer teaches religion and law at Northwestern University.

Divinations- Rereading Late Ancient Religion ii.

Works of law, including the Talmud, are animated by a desire to create clear usable precedent. This animating impulse toward clarity is generally absent in narratives, the form of which is better able to capture the subtleties of lived life. Divinations- Rereading Late Ancient Religion ii.

Wimpfheimer’s work focuses on legal stories in the Babylonian Talmud, arguing that the conjunction of law and narrative makes these passages harder to characterize in a literature normally divided between halakhah (law) and aggadah (nonlegal material) and therefore makes them the ideal texts through which to arrive at a rich, complex understanding of the Talmud as a whole.

student at Yale University -The Blog for the Center of Jewish Law. "Every so often, a book comes along that not only adds to our understanding of an academic field, but also challenges some of the assumptions that define or ground that field. Dvora E. Weisberg, Director of the School of Rabbinical Studies and Associate Professor of Rabbinics, Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion.

Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. The Apostle Paul in Arabia.

Barry Wimpfheimer’s book examines legal narratives, stories that appear in the Talmud as part of a legal discussion and which are ostensibly meant to illustrate a legal principle as it was applied in an actual case. Applying insights from literary criticism and sociology to the Talmud is no mean feat, but Wimpfheimer accomplishes this with elegance. These tools help him demonstrate how these stories work in the context of the Babylonian Talmud, showing the sometimes subtle effect they can have on the legal implications of the text.

In Narrating the Law Barry Scott Wimpfheimer creates a new theoretical framework for considering the relationship between law and narrative and models a new method for studying talmudic law in particular.

Works of law, including the Talmud, are animated by a desire to create clear usable precedent. This animating impulse toward clarity is generally absent in narratives, the form of which is better able to capture the subtleties of lived life. Wimpfheimer proposes to make these different forms compatible by constructing a narrative-based law that considers law as one of several "languages," along with politics, ethics, psychology, and others that together compose culture. A narrative-based law is capable of recognizing the limitations of theoretical statutes and the degree to which other cultural languages interact with legal discourse, complicating any attempts to actualize a hypothetical set of rules. This way of considering law strongly resists the divide in traditional Jewish learning between legal literature (Halakhah) and nonlegal literature (Aggadah) by suggesting the possibility of a discourse broad enough to capture both. Narrating the Law activates this mode of reading by looking at the Talmud's legal stories, a set of texts that sits uncomfortably on the divide between Halakhah and Aggadah. After noticing that such stories invite an expansive definition of law that includes other cultural voices, Narrating the Law also mines the stories for the rich descriptions of rabbinic culture that they encapsulate.