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ePub Earthly Bodies, Magical Selves: Contemporary Pagans and the Search for Community download

by Sarah M. Pike

ePub Earthly Bodies, Magical Selves: Contemporary Pagans and the Search for Community download
Author:
Sarah M. Pike
ISBN13:
978-0520220300
ISBN:
0520220307
Language:
Publisher:
University of California Press; First Edition edition (January 1, 2001)
Category:
Subcategory:
New Age & Spirituality
ePub file:
1381 kb
Fb2 file:
1593 kb
Other formats:
rtf mbr docx lrf
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
529

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Start reading Earthly Bodies, Magical Selves on your Kindle in under a minute. Here are some additional quotations from the book: "Some Pagans also claim Spiritualism as part of their ritual lineage to legitimate their own medium-like practices.

This is the first academic ethnography on magic that has actually been objective in it's portrayal of Paganism. In other words, the author doesn't get caught up in letting her experiences overshadow the importance of actually describing and observing the pagan culture (unlike Magliocco and Greenwood). Her assessment of pagan culture is fairly balanced. She notes both the positive and negatives aspects of the culture and does so in a positive manner, avoiding any hint of cennsure or judgement. She's simply presenting the facts. Granted this doesn't mean there.

Home Browse Books Book details, Earthly Bodies, Magical Selves: Contemporary. During ELFest 1991, I met Kenneth Deigh, a man who plays many roles in the national Neopagan community.

Earthly Bodies, Magical Selves explores larger issues in the United States regarding the postmodern self, utopian communities, cultural improvisation, and contemporary spirituality

Earthly Bodies, Magical Selves explores larger issues in the United States regarding the postmodern self, utopian communities, cultural improvisation, and contemporary spirituality.

Earthly Bodies, Magical Selves incorporates her personal experience and insightful scholarly work concerning ritual, sacred space, self-identity, and narrative. The result is a compelling portrait of this frequently misunderstood religious movement

Earthly Bodies, Magical Selves incorporates her personal experience and insightful scholarly work concerning ritual, sacred space, self-identity, and narrative. The result is a compelling portrait of this frequently misunderstood religious movement. Neo-paganism began emerging as a new religious movement in the late 1960s. In addition to bringing together followers for self-exploration and participation in group rituals, festivals might offer workshops on subjects such as astrology, tarot, mythology, herbal lore, and African drumming.

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The veils that Kenn imagines moving through mark the boundary between the everyday world and the "Magickal one" of the festival.

by Sarah M. Pike (Author). The veils that Kenn imagines moving through mark the boundary between the everyday world and the "Magickal one" of the festival. Festival goers anticipate that festival space will be transformational because it is different from their workplaces and homes. Kenn's vision of trees closing behind him separates Spiral from the quotidian world and marks his departure from daily routines.

Selected articles and book chapters. Pike has written several articles and book chapters on topics such as Burning Man, neopaganism, rituals, environmentalism, youth spirituality, New religious movement and animal rights activism Year.

Recent decades have seen a revival of paganism, and every summer people gather across the United States to celebrate this increasingly popular religion. Sarah Pike's engrossing ethnography is the outcome of five years attending neo-pagan festivals, interviewing participants, and sometimes taking part in their ceremonies. Earthly Bodies, Magical Selves incorporates her personal experience and insightful scholarly work concerning ritual, sacred space, self-identity, and narrative. The result is a compelling portrait of this frequently misunderstood religious movement.Neo-paganism began emerging as a new religious movement in the late 1960s. In addition to bringing together followers for self-exploration and participation in group rituals, festivals might offer workshops on subjects such as astrology, tarot, mythology, herbal lore, and African drumming. But while they provide a sense of community for followers, Neo-Pagan festivals often provoke criticism from a variety of sources—among them conservative Christians, Native Americans, New Age spokespersons, and media representatives covering stories of rumored "Satanism" or "witchcraft."Earthly Bodies, Magical Selves explores larger issues in the United States regarding the postmodern self, utopian communities, cultural improvisation, and contemporary spirituality. Pike's accessible writing style and her nonsensationalistic approach do much to demystify neo-paganism and its followers.
  • This is the first academic ethnography on magic that has actually been objective in it's portrayal of Paganism. In other words, the author doesn't get caught up in letting her experiences overshadow the importance of actually describing and observing the pagan culture (unlike Magliocco and Greenwood).

    Her assessment of pagan culture is fairly balanced. She notes both the positive and negatives aspects of the culture and does so in a positive manner, avoiding any hint of cennsure or judgement. She's simply presenting the facts. Granted this doesn't mean there isn't some subjectivity on her part. Obviously she chose the pagan community because there was a gap in research there and she wants to get tenure, but even with that bias she does a credible job of presenting the pagan community and specifically the festival environment.

  • Had to buy this for a class text. What a load of hooey. Not everything is worthy of study--including this book.

  • At the time this book was published in 2001, Sarah M. Pike was Professor in the Department of Religious Studies at CSU Chico. She has also written New Age and Neopagan Religions in America (Columbia Contemporary American Religion Series).

    She wrote in the Preface to this book, "This is a study of a new religious movement defining and creating itself in the second half of the twentieth century. It is about the festivals that Neopagans hold to celebrate their communities and to experiment with personal religious identities... In this work I explore the ways in which festival space both expresses and shapes the religious yearnings of participants who are searching for spiritual intensity and utopian community."

    Here are some additional quotations from the book:

    "Some Pagans also claim Spiritualism as part of their ritual lineage to legitimate their own medium-like practices." (Pg. 15)
    "'Pagan Standard Time' takes over at festivals, indicating that events will take place eventually, but often not at the hour when they are scheduled." (Pg. 26)
    "For most Neopagans, death is not the end of life but the beginning of another life in the cycle of reincarnation." (Pg. 60-62)
    "Around the campfire others agreed that their festival friends are more of a family than the blood relatives with whom they cannot share their Neo-pagan identities." (Pg. 83)
    "Neopagans ... are often polytheists. The Neopagan world is inclusive of many spirits, ancestors, and gods and goddesses who live side by side." (Pg. 97)
    "By keeping their religious identities to themselves and holding their festivals at isolated sites, Neopagans make their religious practices even more fascinating to outsiders. By the very act of hiding what they are doing, they draw attention to themselves." (Pg. 100)
    "New Agers are superficial and pursue worry-free knowledge, say Neopagans. They profess to follow Native American paths, but unlike Neopagans who attend festivals to get closer to nature, New Agers hypocritically avoid any real contact with the natural world." (Pg. 145)

  • Very well researched.

    I actually picked this book up at Borders while I was perusing the "New Age/Pagan" book section for new titles and noticed that a picture of a friend of mine was in it! So I bought it.. later I found some good information regarding transformational festivals that some friends of mine organize (Lumensgate).

    The author respectifully presented the material and provided pretty good insight into the current Pagan movement in all of its diversity.

    Highly recommended.

  • A very look at how the modern Pagan festival movement is creating personal identity in the Neopagan movement. The author did her research at fests in the Midwest, mainly Pagan Spirit Gathering and Starwood, and obviously enjoyed herself. She speaks glowingly of the power fo key moments at the fests, and examines how Pagans are contructing 'magical identities' in the midst of the modern world. Interesting sociological study.

  • I am forced to wonder whether or not the Pagan people Pike interviewed were aware of the marginalizing tone of her work before she interviewed them. For example, in the chapter entitled "Blood That Matters: Neopagan (sic) Borrowing," she accuses Neo-Pagan people of abdicating their responsibility to the cultures whose traditions they borrow in a section of the chapter entitled "Cultural Strip-Mining." In addition, she does this after mentioning several Neo-Pagan people by name, which unfortunately links these people directly to her accusations. No reasonable human being would volunteer to be insulted in this way, so it must be concluded that Pike deliberately misrepresented her intentions to the Pagan community in order to gain their trust.
    In the same chapter she says, "Neopagan (sic) ways of knowing are not what academic scholars of ancient or non-Western cultures would call "scholarship," though Neopagans (sic) themselves use this term." Again, she makes this accusation after making reference to specific Pagans by name.
    Finally, there are pictures of Pagan people in various states of undress and pictures of Pagan shrines in this text. Strict rules govern the use of cameras at Pagan festivals; those who wish to take pictures must provide reasonable assurances that the subject of the photo will be respected according to whatever conditions the subject lays down. Clearly Pike has violated the spirit and/or the language of whatever provisions her subjects gave her by marginalizing their faith in her work.
    As both a Neo-Pagan and a traditional scholar (B.A. in Celtic Studies/Anthropology at University of Toronto, M.A. in English Literature at University of Maine), I am mortified both as a scholar and a person of faith at the betrayal of trust Pike has visited upon my community. It is as if she walked into our community with promises of guns and whiskey or tetanus vaccinations, and took from us our dignity in the grand old anthropological style.