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ePub Witches and Neighbors: The Social and Cultural Context of European Witchcraft download

by Robin Briggs

ePub Witches and Neighbors: The Social and Cultural Context of European Witchcraft download
Author:
Robin Briggs
ISBN13:
978-0670835898
ISBN:
0670835897
Language:
Publisher:
Viking Adult; First Edition edition (September 1, 1996)
Category:
Subcategory:
New Age & Spirituality
ePub file:
1584 kb
Fb2 file:
1693 kb
Other formats:
rtf doc docx mbr
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
904

Robin Briggs' Witches and Neighbors can be both fascinating and irritating at times throughout the book (and often both at once)

Robin Briggs' Witches and Neighbors can be both fascinating and irritating at times throughout the book (and often both at once). For the area that it does cover, it is minutely thorough. This can be both good or bad as there are many, many anecotes used for evidence of the various themes covered in the book but there is no broad perspective presented and defended.

Witches and Neighbors is a remarkable interpretation of the course and causes of the fear and persecution of witches that bedeviled Europe for centuries. In particular, he employs his own extensive work in the rich archives hidden away in the area in Europe in which so many cases became known

But witch-lynchings continued sporadically through the 1800s, and instances are even known for the 20th century

But witch-lynchings continued sporadically through the 1800s, and instances are even known for the 20th century. VILLAGE WITCHCRAFT DYNAMICS One valuable contribution of Witches and Neighbors is its description of folk rituals that defused tensions and fears of witchcraft in the villages of Lorraine and elsewhere. Briggs’ evidence complements Hans Sebald’s earlier study of similar dynamics in Franconian Switzerland.

Witches and Neighbors book. Witches and Neighbors seems to be Robin Briggs' entry into an ongoing discussion about the causes and effects of European "witchcraft. I had the impression that he was inspired to write partially by the modern neopagan movements: several times he points out that the I borrowed this book from a friend, and I do appreciate the loan: it has a lot of good ideas, and I learned a lot from reading it. However, the prose was too opaque, and the organization too repetitive, to make it a fulfilling read.

See Author's Response. The resulting book will have a deeply corrosive effect on all sorts of traditional wisdom about the subject of witchcraft and society.

Witches and Neighbours is a highly original and unconventional analysis of a fascinating historical phenomenon. Unlike other studies of the subject which focus on the mechanisms of persecution, this book presents a rich picture of witchcraft as an all-pervasive aspect of life in early modern Europe.

He starts by looking at the definition of witchcraft, something that is not often approached in other books of this type. From there, the book studies topics such as the gender issue. The best book on the history of witchcraft I've ever read. com User, October 30, 2003.

a thorough and intriguing look at the witch hunt. briggs does a fine job of showing how the seventeenth century craze was sustained by villagers against their neighbors, as opposed to the earlier anti-witch sentiments that came from the institutions. Myths of the Perfect Witch.

Witches and neighbors. The Social and Cultural Context of European Witchcraft. But Briggs fails to adequately explain the demise of witchcraft in most European cultures in the 17th century.

Witches and Neighbors: the Social and Cultural Context of European Witchcraft. Briggs goes on to consider how tales of the Sabbat must have been told and retold in social situations and among children, until it passed into the genuine folklore of their regions. New York: Viking Penguin, 1996. xviii + 457 pp. Maps, bibliography, and index. Indeed, well-developed Sabbat stories generally came from children supposedly taken there by their elders. For them, in particular, the Sabbat story "was often mediated through personal fantasy and dreams to relate to the personal conflicts of the individual" (p. 49).

Chronicling the brutal inquisitions of suspected witches in European history, a thorough social study includes details about the accused, their prosecutors, and how such trials set a cultural precedent for America's own Salem witch hunts. 20,000 first printing. $20,000 ad/promo.
  • Excellent. The author exhaustively explores the social and cultural elements of the witchcraft period in Europe. Utilizing themes and debunking common perceptions, Briggs explores typically ignored areas of scholarship. While long, the writing is engaging and open to further study.

  • Everything was perfect but this product was classified as a hardcover and I defiantly got a paperback.

  • I'm going to have to review my European history, which is well worth doing before tackling this book. As the title indicates, Briggs examines the history of witchcraft persecution in Europe from a socio-cultural standpoint, taking into account the vast social changes taking place during the early modern period. He is especially thorough in dealing with the meeting of the medieval mind and the modern one, and what conflicts could arise from that meeting.
    At the same time, Briggs addresses the notion that witchcraft persecution owed its pervasiveness to some kind of conspiracy conceived and imposed from above. Actually, as he points out with numerous examples, this kind of thing was quite rare, with authorities for the most part reluctant to give credence to such claims. Presenting a very clear picture of life in the early modern village, he shows how the beliefs of the general populace provided fertile ground in which suspicions could grow into full-blown accusations.
    My only real criticism is that some of his examples are hard to follow; in some cases it's difficult to determine who did or said what in a particular case, especially since the genders associated with many names aren't readily apparent to this American reader. Nonetheless, this is a minor complaint relative to Briggs' extremely thorough analysis and painstaking research.
    And lest we think ourselves beyond such forms of persecution today -- well, have a look at the news over the last few years. Now, as then, witch-hunts seem to consist primarily of looking for someone to blame

  • Robin Briggs' Witches and Neighbors can be both fascinating and irritating at times throughout the book (and often both at once). It is narrowly focused on his own geographic area of expertise, which is the border regions between France and Germany, so readers interested in a pan-European or British examination of witchcraft will have to look elsewhere. For the area that it does cover, it is minutely thorough. This can be both good or bad as there are many, many anecotes used for evidence of the various themes covered in the book but there is no broad perspective presented and defended. The author makes clear his intention to show the complexity of the social construction of witchcraft (which is good) by presenting all of these individual incidents showing that every case can be different from every other case (this can be frustrating for the reader as no general theme emerges to place all of these anecdotes within an historical wev). This book will give the reader some new insights into the complexity of the situation as he tackles other books on similar topics. A fine, yet narrow handling of the social and cultural framework necessary for the growth of the belief in witchcraft.

  • Ths book is packed with enthralling detail from begtinning to end. All sorts of msiconceptions I had previously held about the subject were blown away by this marvellous book. For instance, it is evident that recent writers on the subject have wildly exaggerated the numbers of people put to death as witches, it is often given as several millions, whereas Briggs shows that the actual number is about 40,000. Also another misconnception, that withces were always female, whereas in fact of those put to death about 20% were men, in some areas, men were in the majority of those killed. Also, most of the accusers tended to be women themselves, contrary to the feminist fantasy that it was all about wiched men persecuting women etc. Another fantasy, that midwives were persecuted as witches, weheras in fact when midwives were involved in witchtrials it was generally as inspectors of the accused, to look for suspicious marks on their bodies. There isn't a dull page in this enthralling book.

  • I'm currently reading this book for a graduate school class. I've read many books, some of which have been bad. This one has got to be the worst book I've ever read. I don't look forward to reading this. He lacks a central point. The book simply rambles on from one case example to another....don't waste your time with this it will drive you nuts.
    -1/2 a star