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ePub Christ and the Media (London lectures in contemporary Christianity) download

by Malcolm Muggeridge

ePub Christ and the Media (London lectures in contemporary Christianity) download
Author:
Malcolm Muggeridge
ISBN13:
978-0340224380
ISBN:
034022438X
Language:
Publisher:
Hodder (October 1, 1977)
Category:
ePub file:
1396 kb
Fb2 file:
1560 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
960

Christ and the Media book. Christ and the Media is a lecture series in which BBC media veteran Malcolm Muggeridge confronts the evils of mass media, focusing particularly on television, in light of his Christian faith.

Christ and the Media book. The media in general, and TV in particular, are incomparably. Muggeridge began his career as a university lecturer at the university at Cairo before he took up journalism. When the BBC started its first television program (Panorama) he participated regularly, believing then that there was no real difference between TV journalism and that of any other variety.

In fact, Christ and the Media are incompatible The only criticism I have is that the book has an awkward arraignment.

In fact, Christ and the Media are incompatible. This book important, and has become even more so with the rise of the new Internet and independent media. Media has slowly become "infotainment," and our problem is being able to sort out the aesthetic aspect form the epistemology. The only criticism I have is that the book has an awkward arraignment. It has Muggeridge's three lectures in one section, the Q and A in a second section, and the bracketing Chairmen's speeches in a third. I found myself hopping from section to section to get the flow and context of the discussion.

Throughout his journalistic career, Malcolm Muggeridge was a. .

On radio and television, as a lecturer, journalist and author, he fascinated, delighted, provoked-and sometimes infuriated-his audiences. Christ and the Media is a sharp, witty critique of media-oriented culture with such intriguing fantasies as the "the Fourth Temptation," in which Jesus is approached with the offer of a worldwide TV network. His other books include Jesus Rediscovered, Jesus: The Man Who Lives, and A Third Testament.

What does the book of Jude have to say to our church communities today? Nell Goddard explores in the first of a five-part summer series. Truth in Turmoil Jude (1/5) LICC. 2019 Truth in Turmoil Jude (1/5) Bible Jude, a servant of Jesus Christ and a brother of James, To those who have been called, who are loved in God the Father and kept for Jesus Christ: Mercy, peace and love be yours in abundance.

Thomas Malcolm Muggeridge (24 March 1903 – 14 November 1990) was an English journalist and satirist. His father was a prominent socialist politician and one of the early Labour Party Members of Parliament (for Romford in Essex). In his twenties, Muggeridge was attracted to communism but after living in the Soviet Union in the 1930s, he became a forceful anti-communist.

This is a series of lectures given by the author in 1976. It's a fascinating read against television, and the media, by someone who made their living doing just that thing

This is a series of lectures given by the author in 1976. It's a fascinating read against television, and the media, by someone who made their living doing just that thing. Included at the end are the Q&A that took place at the lectures, and give a great insight into the mood of the audience. Another great inclusion is the response of the chairman at these lectures, two of whom were major heads at the BBC, and one who is a famous evangelical theologian. Very thought provoking, and worth the read.

Malcolm Muggeridge (March 24, 1903 – November 14, 1990) was a British journalist, author, media personality, soldier, spy and Christian scholar

Malcolm Muggeridge (March 24, 1903 – November 14, 1990) was a British journalist, author, media personality, soldier, spy and Christian scholar. Freedom is a mystical truth - it's expressed best in The Brothers Karamazov, the chapter when the Grand Inquisitor confronted the returned Christ

This lecture is concerned with artists who are still alive, and only with those whose work relates fairly directly with Christian Iconography. This is reflected in this statue, which clearly also has echoes of Mary and the Christ child.

This lecture is concerned with artists who are still alive, and only with those whose work relates fairly directly with Christian Iconography. This means that I am not considering here a number of artists who have a strong spiritual dimension to their work and whose work often has recognisable visual resonances with Christian themes. Crucifixion Iain McKillop, Pietà Gloucester Cathedral Altar Piece, 2003 McKillop studied history of art at Manchester University and fine art at Kingston University.

The college also runs a bookstore, Moore Books, which provides low cost Christian books to students and the public. These students initially attended evening lectures but the course was gradually offered by correspondence. The department still runs evening lectures as well as a more fully developed correspondence course offered at three levels: the Preliminary Theological Certificate, the Certificate in Theology and the Diploma in Biblical Studies. In 2006 there were just under 2000 students enrolled in correspondence course subjects.

  • This is Malcolm Muggeridge's critique of The Media, with a special emphasis on television. His thesis is that 1) television is the greatest influence upon the modern word, and 2) televisions influence, on the whole, has been detrimental to civilization. (23)

    His first lecture is a thought-experiment. He sees Christ rejecting an offer from Satan for prime-time TV appearance-what he called "the Fourth Temptation of Christ"- as the example for latter-day Christians (Lecture 1). By the very nature of televion, the Christian message would be distorted. Television is so controlled and stylized, it is essentially a "fantasy-machine" (62). He continually affirms that "the media is the world of shadows." (74)

    His second thought-experiment is a bit more poignant. In the second lecture, entitled "The Dead Sea Videotapes," he imagines what future archaeologists would make of our world if they studied our television programs. His conclusion is that our civilization was a cult of progress, sexual consumption, and education. (53ff). Reality TV, anyone?

    His last lecture is a boiler-plait discussion on television as epistemology. His specific target is the strictly homogenized, carefully edited product called "Newzak." After citing some startling incidents that evince that news is "not so much what has happened, as what can be seen [caught on tape] as happening, or what seems to have happened." (62) He closes his lecture and the conference by comparing TV with Plato's cave: if all we see are shadows on a wall, then for all intents and purposes, that is what is real.

    Although the overall feel to the lectures is negative- Muggeridge confesses he threw out his TV years ago-his method is a remotive "Via Negativa": if media is so bad, then the only way to come to reality is by way of Christ. In fact, Christ and the Media are incompatible.

    This book important, and has become even more so with the rise of the new Internet and independent media. Media has slowly become "infotainment," and our problem is being able to sort out the aesthetic aspect form the epistemology. Furthermore, Muggeridge was leery of the proto-political correctness "collective thought" that was apparent in the BBC:

    "There is something, to me, very sinister about this emergence of a weird kind of conformity, or orthodoxy, particularly among the people who operate the media, so that you can tell in advance exactly what they will say and think about anything. It is true that so far they have not got an Inquisition to enforce their orthodoxy, but they do have ways of enforcing it which make the old thumbscrews and racks seem quite paltry." (91)

    "Consensus-making and -promoting, I should say, is to be seen historically as an instinctive preparation for some sort of conformist-collectivist society which lies ahead whatever may happen, all that is in doubt being the precise ideology which will characterize it." (52)

    This is significant because Orwell told him that 1984's Ministry of Truth was based on the BBC (105)

    So this book is a call for the Christian to consider his part in watching the media and for the Christian directly involved wit the media. To both, MM warns: do not set your media heroes and yourself up as a false idol. The Second commandment (Thou shalt have no other gods before me) applied to the small screen as well as the field of Moloch, which can be the same thing. (94)

    *

    The only criticism I have is that the book has an awkward arraignment. It has Muggeridge's three lectures in one section, the Q and A in a second section, and the bracketing Chairmen's speeches in a third. I found myself hopping from section to section to get the flow and context of the discussion. I would have kept all their sections in order, to ease the flow of reading. This was done with Craig and Ludemann's debate on Christ's Resurrection and it perfected the intellectual experience.

  • What if Jesus was confronted with a fourth temptation, namely that he get his own T.V. rights? That is the thought experiment that stimulates Malcolm Muggeridge to lecture on that subject.

    Christ and the Media is, at its core, an analysis of how the world of modern media has impacted the Christian worldview and lifestyle which Jesus asked his disciples to follow. Muggeridge makes some significant remarks about how an image based cultural heritage differs from an oral traditional heritage. Where once word of mouth and written dialogue were the primary form of cultural transmission, the 20th century and onward has seen a revolution in which the primary mode of cultural transmission has become audio-visual.

    I think most of the other reviewers have hit on many of the strengths that this book has on a philosophical and theological level. However, I believe the book has another appeal within that should arouse the interest even of the non-Christian reader; namely the aforementioned anthropological reflection on how the mode of cultural transmission has shifted. I firmly believe, just as a basic human being, that it is important to think critically of the audiovisual transmission of culture as absolute. The height of technological ability in the West has rendered us even more isolationist in our dealings with other human beings. People in neighborhoods don't wave to one another anymore, and we are too busy creating idealized, fictional self-representations on MYSPACE to allow ourselves basic intimate conversations with the human beings closest to us. These are the repercussions of such a shift in cultural transmission.

    Not only does Muggeridge address this, but he also addresses some important epistemological issues like the relationship between perception (say, seeing something on TV) and the concept of truth (yeah it was on TV, but is it true, partially true, or totally false, or conditioned severly by certain ideological preferences?). There is a difference, he would say, between seeing with the eye and through the eye. Muggeridge makes this philosophical realization which I believe is critical to the survival of Western civilization.

    A critic might look at Muggeridge and believe him to be some sort of Puritan whacko who wants to censor anything remotely contradictory to the Christian faith. This is not so. Read his 'Chronicles of Wasted Time' and you find that he has been a journalist or teacher in Egypt, the USSR, and India, and had a father who was a socialist with strong Marxist leanings, including at minimum a strong cynicism toward religion of any kind. What he wants to do with the book, first and foremost, is describe the impact of television and other forms of media unique to the 20th and 21st centuries on Christianity and also consider how Christianity might interact with the media. However, as I said before, I think the book makes a relevant point for ALL people who have been heavily influenced by TV and the Internet, not just Christians. For this reason alone, I highly recommend this book.