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ePub This Is It: The Nature of Oneness*Interviews with Teachers of Non-Duality Including Eckhart Tolle, author of The Power of Now download

by Tony Parsons,Jan Kersschot

ePub This Is It: The Nature of Oneness*Interviews with Teachers of Non-Duality Including Eckhart Tolle, author of The Power of Now download
Author:
Tony Parsons,Jan Kersschot
ISBN13:
978-1842930939
ISBN:
1842930931
Language:
Publisher:
Watkins (July 28, 2006)
Category:
Subcategory:
Religious Studies
ePub file:
1546 kb
Fb2 file:
1553 kb
Other formats:
mobi txt docx lrf
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
878

For a book about non-dualism, it has a strangely two-pronged flavor.

For a book about non-dualism, it has a strangely two-pronged flavor. First, it is making the general and expected points: No need to do anything, you are already enlightened (except that you don't exist and enlightenment is meaningless to begin with), etc. Second, it has a definite under-edge of Non-Dual community infighting. At times, it has a strangely catty, insider tone.

Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Jan Kersschot's books.

translated the title reads; it is as it is, conversations about Oneness ). This alone makes me rate it with 1 star. Foreword by Tony Parsons.

Through conversations with some of today's foremost spiritual guides, including Eckhart Tolle (author of The Power of Now), Douglas Harding (author of the acclaimed On Having No Head), Nathan Gill, Chuck Hillig, Wayne Liquorman, and others, this inspirational study offers reassurance that everything is exactly how it is supposed to b. nd teaches us to accept that truth. Dutch version (translated the title reads; it is as it is, conversations about Oneness ). Original title; This Is It. There is no reference to original writer. Other than that, I found it boring.

This Is It: The Nature of Oneness Interviews with Teachers of Non-Duality Including Eckhart Tolle, author of The Power of Now. by Jan Kersschot. It's an interview that really demystifies him. I highly recommend it if you are a fan of Tolle yet feel he is somehow above you or better than you. Many of the other interviews are good as well. Amazing and practical. com User, September 5, 2005. The book, This Is It, by Jan Kerschott, is unerringly explicit in addressing the core of true non-dualism.

However, the knowledge and profound revelations contained in this book are of. .This Is It : The Nature of Oneness - Interviews with Teachers of Non-Duality Including Eckhart Tolle, author of the Power of Now by Jan Kersschot (1999, Paperback).

However, the knowledge and profound revelations contained in this book are of value to all, whether Masons or non-Masons, who are interested in human betterment. The author makes clear that Masonry is not for any special race, religion or gender, but for all of humanity-the conscious self in every human body. He also reveals how any one of us can choose to prepare for the highest purposes of mankind: Self-knowledge, regeneration, conscious immortality.

The Power of Now A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment. By eckhart tolle Beautifully packaged with evocative artwork and design, Oneness with All Life highlights the most inspiring and beautiful insights from A New Earth. To make the journey into the Now we will need to leave our analytical mind and its false created self, the ego, behind. Beautifully packaged with evocative artwork and design, Oneness with All Life highlights the most inspiring and beautiful insights from A New Earth. Practicing the Power of Now. By eckhart tolle.

The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment is a book by Eckhart Tolle. The book is intended to be a guide for day-to-day living and stresses the importance of living in the present moment and transcending thoughts of the past or future

The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment is a book by Eckhart Tolle. The book is intended to be a guide for day-to-day living and stresses the importance of living in the present moment and transcending thoughts of the past or future. As of 2009, it was estimated that three-million copies had been sold in North America.

Summary of The Power of Now. Eckhart Tolle This enlightenment occurs when you tap into your true nature and returns you to your natural state. Eckhart Tolle. At getAbstract, we summarize books that help people understand the world and make it better. Whatever we select for our library has to excel in one or the other of these two core criteria: Enlightening – You’ll learn things that will inform and improve your decisions. This enlightenment occurs when you tap into your true nature and returns you to your natural state. Your thoughts – the ceaseless self-talk streaming through your mind – block the experience of Being.

It is an experience without opposite and it cannot be reconciled with illusions of any kind including: pain, fear, sadness, et.

It is an experience without opposite and it cannot be reconciled with illusions of any kind including: pain, fear, sadness, etc. It can be pointed at and spoken about with words and concepts, yet it cannot be truly known until all words and concepts have been forgiven, laid aside, and recognized as false.

The Power Of Now Eckhart Tolle. A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment. CONTENTS Preface xiii Foreword xvii Acknowledgments xxiii Introduction 1 The Origin of This Book 1 The Truth That Is Within You 3. CHAPTER ONE: You Are Not Your Mind 9 The Greatest Obstacle to Enlightenment 9 Freeing Yourself from Your Mind 14 Enlightenment: Rising above Thought 18 Emotion: The Body's Reaction to Your Mind.

Everything you need to know, you know already. That’s the message Jan Kerschott brings seekers who have been desperately trying to “find themselves,” but still have not achieved a sense of well-being. In fact, the desperate struggle to reach enlightenment can actually be counterproductive, increasing feelings of alienation. Through conversations with some of today's foremost spiritual guides, including Eckhart Tolle (author of The Power of Now), Douglas Harding (author of the acclaimed On Having No Head), Nathan Gill, Chuck Hillig, Wayne Liquorman, and others, this inspirational study offers reassurance that everything is exactly how it is supposed to be…and teaches us to accept that truth.
  • The relative story of "me" will preface this review by stating first,that I have read Nisargadatta,Ramana Maharshi, Krishnamurti,Wei Wu Wei,etc...All the spiritual "great" standards.Second,this is a review of a book about a subject that words cannot explain. That being said if "you" are looking for a clear and concise book on radical nonduality this is on "my" must-read list.
    Do "yourself" a favor, if you don't just "choose" to "wake up" on "your own". Read the following:
    1)All books by Jeff Foster
    2)All books by Joan Tollifson
    3)All books by Leo Hartong
    4)All books by Fred Davis
    5)Oneness-John Greven
    6)Radically Condensed Instructions for being Just as you Are-J.Matthews
    7)All books by Scott Kiloby
    8)Living Nonduality-Robert Wolfe
    9)All books by Nathan Gill
    10)All books by Charlie Hayes
    11)All books by Jan Kersschot
    Others have been read,(Parsons,Spira, Adamson, Balsekar, Liquorman, etc..)but the above listed are "who" resonated with the story of "me". Enjoy!

  • The book, This Is It, by Jan Kerschott, is unerringly explicit in addressing the core of true non-dualism. It does so in both a general, sweeping fashion, in relation to a basic, overall consideration of religion and spirituality, and in a precise, deliberate manner clarifying the misleading (and divinely perfect) dualistic teachings that present themselves as non-dualistic. Why is this important? Because it is so easy to believe in a path to what is. I was heavily into an understanding that was couched in non-dualistic notions, but upon looking more closely was, actually steeped in duality. Such directives as the need to meditate more, be silent more, be more honest, more passionate, more, more, more have been seen to only push away freedom. Kerschott's book spoke to a deep place in awareness and exposed in nakedness the contradictions so visible when seen with clarity. This book is not for everyone. Anyone who wants to progress and develop into what already is will not enjoy this. But if you are open to seeing that there is nothing but the truth, then freedom already is.

  • This is on the radical fringe of the neo-advaita scene. Absolute take-no-prisoners "everything-is-total-illusion-and-that's-just-fine-there's-absolutely-nothing-to-be-done-about-it".

    For a book about non-dualism, it has a strangely two-pronged flavor.

    First, it is making the general and expected points: No need to do anything, you are already enlightened (except that you don't exist and enlightenment is meaningless to begin with), etc.

    Second, it has a definite under-edge of Non-Dual community infighting. At times, it has a strangely catty, insider tone. I feel it is written not so much for the general person just trying to figure things out, but for a specific narrow sub-readership of people who are very experienced shoppers in the spiritual supermarket, even or especially people who've been around the non-dual track a few times. These are the people that the author wants to reach, and get them to 'stop seeking'.

    Though of course, even 'stop seeking' is "doing" something, or having a kind of program, and therefore unacceptable. Except that of course EVERYTHING is acceptable because it is all illusory anyway.

    I say that this author (and his interviewees) are on the far edge of current non-dual thought in that other stars like Byron Katie still offer a kind of goal (cessation of mental suffering) and a sort of problem-solving method (4 questions) to advance that program. Or for example Gangaji is supposedly pure advaita but she subtly asserts the reality of various distinctions, such as guru v. seeker; a more lovely Satsang space v. a less-lovely one; a community of friends pursuing the goal or teachings together (as though that would help it along); etc.

    But the authors of "This Is It" are uncompromising and will have none-of-the-above. EVERYTHING is equally fake (or real, but in any case meaningless) and there's absolutely NOTHING to be done about it... except the reader is still left with the feeling that s/he as a regular gal/guy hasn't quite 'got it' (but no, no, there's NOTHING to GET, dumbkoff!) and ... you still don't really understand (that there's NOTHING to UNDERSTAND, you dork!) ... that's the flavor of it.

    Interesting in a way.

    However, this tough-man macho version of neo-advaita makes constant use of analogies like "All the sand castles on a beach appear separate but since they are actually all made of sand there's no difference among them and they are all the same thing - namely, sand". Or similar images of water, characters in a movie on the screen all being made of the light projected from the booth, etc.

    This reductionist argument is logically erroneous, in that identity of material is not absolute identity. Different individual sand castles represent different information vectors and have different entropic coding potential. They differ absolutely, at the level of information structure. Admittedly these differences in entropic coding potential are non-physical in some sense, and hard to quantify without a context, but they are real, though subtle. It is an odd and unexpectedly materialistic argument - the assertion that material identity equals absolute identity. Anyway, the only actual identity these authors can accept is equal emptiness or equally distributed 'Light' or 'Unicity'.

    Of course the authors would say that comments such as mine above are just the mind (small egoic mind) trying to FIGURE IT OUT, which is completely IMPOSSIBLE anyway. And there's nothing to figure out.

    However, suffering does seem to remain, no matter what. They are explicit on this point - suffering is fine, it is just more flickers on the screen. But while I'm not a Buddhist, I do accept the practical Buddhist goal of an end of suffering.

    These guys have zero interest in that, because 'goal' implies 'time' which of course is utter illusion, furthermore they don't want to make quality judgements over experience. To them seeking an end to suffering (personal or universal) is merely a cat chasing his tail.

    So it is truly a completely empty and meaningless teaching, a "difference which makes no difference". For all I know, it may be the simple truth. But "I" (??) suspect otherwise, because this random theory of meaningless "arising" of phenomena and experience does not account for the consistency of physical and psychological effects experienced by human beings.

    But the authors would say that my small mind (which doesn't exist) is just playing stupid small-mind games. Which is ok, it's all fine as it is.

  • Mr Kersschot says in his book that there is nothing to do....that we are already "IT"
    However....what about the 25 plus years he spent meditating, reading, doing workshops and doing interviews with those that were awakened?
    How can he honestly say - without a single doubt - that those 25 years did not prepare his seeming mind to accept the words that Tony Parsons gave to him, "This is It"?????
    Nisargadatta Maharaj believed his teacher who told him that this is an illusion and the Truth is One/God/The Absolute (whatever term we want to use)....meditated on this for 3 years.....and Awakened...
    Franklin Merrel-Wolff was a "seeker" for 25 years....meditation....contemplation....study.....and then he Awakened....
    There are many, many stories like this.
    We (the illusion of us an individual) are under the mistaken belief that we separated from One. This belief is rigidly held and apparently validated continually through our seeming 5 senses. Cracking the "shell" of that belief, and preparing our seeming minds to accept the Truth (that none of this happened, is happening....isn't real...etc) may take a process. And each to their own.