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by elizabeth-taylor

ePub A View of the Harbour (Virago Modern Classics) download
Author:
elizabeth-taylor
ISBN13:
978-1844083220
ISBN:
1844083225
Language:
Publisher:
Virago UK; New edition (2006)
Category:
ePub file:
1980 kb
Fb2 file:
1917 kb
Other formats:
mobi txt lrf lrf
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
659

This is a neatly plotted book about three subjects that seem unappealing: an unlovely but nice old woman with good manners, the problem of getting through the end of life all alone, and betrayals even by people who like you. Yet it can be very funny and the plot twists are delicious. The era is the sixties, and taylor brings it all back to you, but at a grateful distance. When you finish it you may feel quite moved by it. I can see why this book had been short listed for the booker prize.

Elizabeth Taylor (1912-1975) is increasingly recognised as one of the best British writers of the twentieth century. She wrote her first book, At Mrs Lippincote's, during the war while her husband was in the Royal Air Force, and this was followed by eleven further novels and a children's book, Mossy Trotter.

A View of the Harbour book. I live in one harbour-town, I work in another, and Elizabeth Taylor swept me away to another harbour-town in another age. To Newby, a small town on the south coast just after the war. Bertram Hemingway, a retired naval man, was a newcomer to the town. He intended to spend his days painting views of the harbour.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for A View Of The Harbour: A Virago . Elizabeth Taylor (1912-1975) was born andeducated in Reading. On leaving school she worked as a governess& later in a library. She lived much of her married life inthe village of Penn, Bucks.

Elizabeth Taylor (1912-1975) was born andeducated in Reading.

Beautiful divorcee Tory is painfully involved with her neighbour, Robert, while his wife Beth, Tory's best friend, is consumed by the worlds she creates in her novels, oblivious to the relationship developing next door. Their daughter Prudence is aware, however, and is appalled by the treachery she observes. Mrs Bracey, an invalid whose grasp on life is slipping,.

Angel: A Virago Modern Classic -. by: Elizabeth Taylor. Reflections Of A ManReflections Of A Man is a book designed for both men and women to enhance the q. . Fifteen-year-old Angelica Deverell knows she is different, that she is destined to become a feted a.

A View Of The Harbour : A Virago Modern Classic. VMC Designer Collection. By (author) Elizabeth Taylor, Introduction by Sarah Waters.

A view of the harbour. A view of the harbour. by. Taylor, Elizabeth, 1912-1975. Penguin Books-Virago Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

A View Of The Harbour: A Virago Modern Classic - Virago Modern Classics (Paperback)

A View Of The Harbour: A Virago Modern Classic - Virago Modern Classics (Paperback). Elizabeth Taylor (author), Sarah Waters (author of introduction). Books included in the VMC 40th anniversary series include: Frost in May by Antonia White; The Collected Stories of Grace Paley; Fire from Heaven by Mary Renault; The Magic Toyshop by Angela Carter; The Weather in the Streets by Rosamond Lehmann; Deep Water by Patricia Highsmith; The Return of the Soldier by Rebecca West; Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale.

A View of the Harbour is a novel by Elizabeth Taylor. First published in 1947 in England and the United States, it was her third novel. It is the first of her novels in which one of the main characters is a creative artist. The relationship of the artist to society and other people was to be an important theme in Taylor's subsequent work. The narrative, which is set in a postwar English seaside town, is told from the points of view of several characters.

Rare book
  • The truth about aging is a subject we want to avoid. Elizabeth Taylor confronts the truth with sensitivity and honesty, stripping away the platitudes about the golden years and showing us the reality of life for an older person in contemporary Western society. The individual is rendered meaningless the more they are removed from the family group, and even when included there’s a sense of alienation. In spare sentences without false emotion, Taylor gives us a heart-wrenching picture of Mrs. Palfrey, a woman doing her best to keep her dignity. The writing has a vibrant eloquence, and was a joy to read.

    Taylor deftly portrays Mrs. Palfrey as tough in a British stiff-upper-lip way. She refuses to be isolated, and seeks friendship, with mixed results, as others her age are totted off to nursing homes or live in their daydreams. Her one success is the relationship with a young man who goes along with the lie that he is her nephew. He does this in exchange for the material he finds for a book he’s writing, but not entirely one suspects, as his own relationships are unstable. She goes along as well since refuting it would cause more consternation and she’s able to at least have a relationship. It’s her refusal to go quietly that causes her to fall, quite literally. Is it better to sit and wait for death, or to die rushing to meet someone, to do something? This is a question all who live to a ripe old age will ask themselves.

  • I've read Mrs.Palfrey at the Claremont when I was in my late twenties, early forties and just recently at age 66 yrs. Each time a wholly new and beautiful experience. Having read great fiction my entire (long) life .... I declare this is , without a doubt, the best book ever written !!!
    Elizabeth Coles Taylor writes with subdued passion, piercing observations, hilarity and always immense and genuine compassion. She is one of a handful of writers who can produce the highest art on the page without the need to insert herself, her views, her opinions. She is superior enough to allow the reader to enter the character and experience their world, without the annoying tricks and stunts so often displayed by inferior writers whose main objective seems to be "look at how talented I am" "I'm so outrageous", etc. etc. ad nauseum.

  • This is not the only time I saw the film first and bought the book after the fact and once again, in this case, it was well worth the purchase. The film was stunning and accurate but the novel gives us a few more characters to familiarize ourselves with and even more to fall in love with as to the relationship formed between Mrs. Palfrey and her new found friend, "Ludo." It is the poignant story of a woman who has had a rich life but who finds herself very much alone in London during her the last years of her life. Taking up her new life at one of the many Hotel-Residences there, Mrs. Palfrey realizes, in very short order, that neither her grandson or her daughter are going to be at the center of her life, as she had envisioned and perhaps even hoped for A severe fall and chance meeting of a caring young man are the events that turn her world around and ultimately give her the gift of a lifetime. Buy the book and the film...you'll never regret the purchase of either for both are superbly done and deserve space on your shelf of keepers.

  • This is a neatly plotted book about three subjects that seem unappealing: an unlovely but nice old woman with good manners, the problem of getting through the end of life all alone, and betrayals even by people who like you. Yet it can be very funny and the plot twists are delicious. The era is the sixties, and taylor brings it all back to you, but at a grateful distance. When you finish it you may feel quite moved by it. I can see why this book had been short listed for the booker prize.

  • "Every day for an infant means some new little thing learned; every day for the old means some little thing lost. {...} Both infancy and age are tiring times."

    "{S}he knew that, as she got older, she looked at her watch more often, and that it was always earlier than she had thought it would be. When she was young, it had always been later."

    A short, quiet novel about a widow who moves into a London residential hotel. Its exploration of the social dynamics of the group of elders there is comical; its examination of aging is devastating. This was my introduction to Taylor and I'll read more.

  • One of my favorite films so decided to read book it is based on. Film and novel are different genres and I generally enjoy book more. However in this case I like the film more. In film Luda is a much more appealing character and the relationship between he and Mrs. Palfrey is central. In novel his character like others is peripheral to the story of aging in a society that doesn’t care about the elderly. Thus focus in novel is much more grim.

  • I saw a movie made of the book and enjoyed it. As usual, the book adds more information about the characters and story line than is evident in the movie. The movie was a good depiction of the book. It was an easy read, not a "page turner" but very enjoyable nevertheless. I will read more by Elizabeth Taylor.

  • The writing is good the subject sad to me. Perhaps because my sister is failing. Aging can be very sad. You may very well enjoy the read. I just found heavy and sad.