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by Derek Ward-Thompson

ePub An Introduction to Star Formation download
Author:
Derek Ward-Thompson
ISBN13:
978-0521639675
ISBN:
0521639670
Language:
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press (March 1, 2004)
Category:
Subcategory:
Astronomy & Space Science
ePub file:
1712 kb
Fb2 file:
1565 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.7
Votes:
649

This book presents star formation and interstellar medium studies at a level appropriate for advanced undergraduate . quite beautiful, the book is a pleasure to read

This book presents star formation and interstellar medium studies at a level appropriate for advanced undergraduate and first year graduate students in astronomy and astrophysics programs. Ward-Thompson and Whitworth, guide the reader step by step through the basics of interstellar clouds, the physics of gravitational collapse, and the connection of stellar birth to the formation of both planets and galaxies.

Derek Ward-Thompson, Anthony P. Whitworth. This book presents star formation and interstellar medium studies at a level appropriate for advanced undergraduate and first year graduate students in astronomy and astrophysics programs. Online ISBN: 9780511974021.

Start by marking An Introduction to Star Formation as Want to Read . Guiding the reader through all the stages that lead to the formation of a star such as our Sun, this advanced textbook provides students with a complete overview of star formation.

Start by marking An Introduction to Star Formation as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Each chapter combin Guiding the reader through all the stages that lead to the formation of a star such as our Sun, this advanced textbook provides students with a complete overview of star formation.

Derek Ward-Thompson is Deputy Head of the School of Physics and Astronomy at Cardiff University

Derek Ward-Thompson is Deputy Head of the School of Physics and Astronomy at Cardiff University. Anthony Whitworth is a Professor in the School of Physics and Astronomy at Cardiff University.

By: Derek Ward-Thompson et al. Publisher: Cambridge University Press. You are leaving VitalSource and being redirected to An Introduction to Star Formation. These books conform to EPUB3 industry standards

By: Derek Ward-Thompson et al. Print ISBN: 9780521630306, 0521630304. eTextbook Return Policy. These books conform to EPUB3 industry standards. Reflowable eTextbooks support a wide range of features, including (but not limited to): notes, highlights, text-to-speech, printing, syncing across devices, and more. Note: Some Reflowable eTextbooks are designed to mimic fixed layout. Reflowable eTextbooks do not maintain the layout of a traditional bound book.

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Автор: Ward-Thompson Название: An Introduction to Star Formation Издательство: Cambridge Academ .

An Introduction to Star Formation: Introduction. Derek Ward-Thompson, Anthony Peter Whitworth. A key parameter to the description of all star formation processes is the density structure of the gas. In this letter, we make use of probability distribution functions (PDFs) of Herschel colum. More).

Lancaster artist and UCLan graduate Bonnie Craig has worked with Professor Derek Ward-Thompson from the School of Physical Sciences and Computing to show how artists and scientists can work together to bring new perspectives on each other’s work.

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Guiding the reader through all the stages that lead to the formation of a star such as our Sun, this advanced textbook provides students with a complete overview of star formation. It examines the underlying physical processes that govern the evolution from a molecular cloud core to a main-sequence star, and focuses on the formation of solar-mass stars. Each chapter combines theory and observation, helping readers to connect with and understand the theory behind star formation. Beginning with an explanation of the interstellar medium and molecular clouds as sites of star formation, subsequent chapters address the building of typical stars and the formation of high-mass stars, concluding with a discussion of the by-products and consequences of star formation. This is a unique, self-contained text with sufficient background information for self-study, and is ideal for students and professional researchers alike.
  • I enjoyed reading this book and it made me want to go deeper into the subject matter -- an easy recommend. It uses the theme of star formation to cover a broad swath of general astrophysics at an introductory level, in only about 200 pages. Topics range from radiative transfer and stellar atmospheres to astrochemistry, magnetic fields in the interstellar medium and the evolution of galaxies. The authors also make some tantalizing connections to emerging hot topics, such as exoplanets and astrobiology. The book was developed as a text for advanced undergraduate and first-year graduate courses, so a background in physics and calculus is assumed. Nonetheless, it's written as a monograph, without exercises, in a style engaging enough to make for a very pleasant few afternoons' read. (Calibration: I'd had some prior exposure to a lot of this material, but it's been several decades since I last studied it in earnest.)

    In most chapters, the authors are at pains to explain the physical meaning of the terms of all major equations. Things get a bit more rushed in the chapters about the births of Main Sequence stars and of massive O and B stars (Chaps 6 & 7): a few equations or facts are dropped in from nowhere, and some of the equations are hard to feel intuitively, involving stuff like taking the 66/31-th power of temperature. But even in those chapters, the theoretical material is tied back to observations. Suggestions for further reading, usually textbooks, are listed at the end of each chapter. I hope that a future edition will include more references to original papers, or even a commented bibliography in the style of review articles in Nature: it would be nice to get a sense of when some of this material had been discovered. In any case, this book provides a great opportunity for a physics-minded reader to shift his or her attention from such big-budget blockbuster topics as cosmology, "theories of everything," etc., and to appreciate stars in their own right.

  • I very much enjoyed reading certain chapters of this book but not so much other chapters. Specifically, I found the material in the chapters 2, 3, and 4 to be excellent - just at the right level of mathematical sophistication as well as being packed with physical insight. These chapters constitute a careful discussion of what can be gleaned from observation about distant regions of space. The authors must be congratulated on their presentation in these chapters.

    Unfortunately, even though the heart of the book is in chapters 5 and 6, I found both lacking the excellence of the earlier chapters. The feeling of being rushed that a previous reviewer had mentioned was an apt description; the development was too fast and too furious. For example, equations as well as numbers were pulled like the proverbial rabbit out of a hat and one was never told if these were empirical or were they derived from a model. Furthermore, no concrete aide was provided to the reader as to where to go to verify and/or validate those equations and numbers.

    I suppose that is to be expected from an introductory survey but I found it regrettable that the beautiful developments of earlier chapters began deteriorating by chapter 5 and were lost by chapter 7. Potential readers must also be advised that this book, even though introductory, requires a certain amount of physical maturity to grasp the mathematical and physical arguments of this work.

    I think it will be a good idea for the authors to revise this book, remove chapter 7 on Heavy Stars, and expand, instead, chapters 5 and 6.

    I read this book for fun, to learn more astrophysics (my own background is Ph.D. in theoretical physics) and I was not disappointed in that. I recommend this book to all who wish to develop an elementary understanding of this area of research.