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ePub Moons and Planets download

by William K. Hartmann

ePub Moons and Planets download
Author:
William K. Hartmann
ISBN13:
978-0534493936
ISBN:
0534493939
Language:
Publisher:
Brooks Cole; 5 edition (June 11, 2004)
Category:
Subcategory:
Astronomy & Space Science
ePub file:
1811 kb
Fb2 file:
1992 kb
Other formats:
txt lit doc azw
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
829

I've been teaching a university course in Planetary Geology from 1987 to 2010 and I was in need of a textbook.

I've been teaching a university course in Planetary Geology from 1987 to 2010 and I was in need of a textbook.

William Kenneth Hartmann (born June 6, 1939) is a noted planetary scientist, artist, author, and writer

William Kenneth Hartmann (born June 6, 1939) is a noted planetary scientist, artist, author, and writer. Born in Pennsylvania in 1939, he received his . in physics from Pennsylvania State University, and an . in geology and PhD in astronomy from the University of Arizona.

Moons and Planets book.

MARS UNDERGROUND William K. Hartmann TOR® A Tom Doherty Associates Book New York Other Books by William K. Hartmann The American Desert Astronomy: The . Hartmann The American Desert Astronomy: The Cosmic Journey Th.

Such basins have since been recognized on most cratered planets and satellites. The date was confirmed five years later with Apollo samples from the moon

William K. Hartmann's interest in general span the origin and evolution of the planetary system and planetary surfaces. Special interests have included of evolution of surface features, craters, and interplanetary bodies. Such basins have since been recognized on most cratered planets and satellites. This was first recognized on "rectified photos" in which telescopic photos of the moon were projected on a globe. The date was confirmed five years later with Apollo samples from the moon.

Author William Hartmann has fully updated this text, which retains a comparative approach to the principles of planetology, including organization by physical topic rather than by planet. This unique approach promotes an understanding of the unifying principles and processes that cause similarities and differences among the moon and planets.

August 7, 2009 William K. Hartmann has been . Although Hartmann has applied the isochron system mainly to the Moon and Mars, his long-term goal is to apply the concept to planets and satellites throughout the solar system. Hartmann has been named the 2010 winner of the Meteoritical Society's Barringer Medal and Award, which recognizes outstanding work in the field of impact cratering. Hartmann, co-founder of the Tucson-based Planetary Science Institute (PSI), is an internationally recognized expert on impact cratering and the evolution of planetary surfaces.

Author William Hartmann has fully updated this text, which retains a comparative approach to the principles of planetology, including organization by physical topic rather than by planet. This unique approach promotes an understanding of the unifying principles and processes that cause similarities and differences among the moon and planets. This edition features findings and photos from Mars Odyssey and Mars Global Surveyor missions as well as information on new discoveries about Mars, such as underground ice and possible glacial features. The author also includes new results about the "Tagish Lake fireball," material from the landing of the NEAR spacecraft on asteroid Eros, and updates on satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. The text's unique math boxes provide flexibility to teach planetary science at a descriptive level or at a moderately advanced level involving algebra and elementary calculus.
  • I thought it was another, much better produced book about our planets and their moons. This was produced without much interest on the part of authors and did not leave me excited about the material.

  • For a book that costs as much as $100 it feels more elementry school level than the college text book I expected. On top of that a bit more dated than I expected (Pluto is still called a planet).

  • This book is very good at a conceptual level and does a very good job explaining observations in photo and written format. I used it for an Astronomy class and was a little disappointed on the detail of math in this book. Of course it has your basic stuff like Kepler's laws, Accretion, and relation of Kinetic Energy with orbit shapes and stuff but they are separated as optional notes instead of derived in text. That could be good or bad depending what you want, but the book itself is very good and the product arrived in great condition.

  • Great Item!!!!

  • The book "Moons and Planets" by William K. Hartmann has been around a long time and I have the Fourth Edition. I've been teaching a university course in Planetary Geology from 1987 to 2010 and I was in need of a textbook. As such, I asked the various companies about available books and this is one that I turned up. I asked the company representative I might have a copy as a reference book in that the organization of the book was such that I couldn't use it as a text. The lady reluctantly sent me a copy, and I am thankful.

    This is an interesting book, without question. I've been aware of Hartmann for several decades, at least. He is not only a planetary geologist, but an accomplished artist and has turned out some superb illustrations of space-related things. I've used them in classes and in giving public talks. His book is a massive compendium of information and, as such, is one of the most useful planetary reference books that I have. However, I found that the structure and organization of the book is such that I would be totally unable to use it as a text book in the way that I teach and, I suspect, that most other professors would have the same difficulties. Also, as a book, I find it both interesting and informative, but I could never sit down and read it cover to cover. The organization just won't allow it. I use it as a reference. If I'm interested it Titan (a large satellite of Saturn), for example, I go to his index, look up Titan and see what categories of information he might have and go the the referred spots for information. In this way, it's a very interesting and useful book and I recommend it, if that fits your needs.

    Note that my comments apply to the fourth edition and this is a sales page for the fifth edition. Well, that's a function of the very active NASA and other national space programs. The new information is just streaming in and it requires constant revision. The old information isn't going obsolete, it's more a matter of abundant new information be added to the older accumulation. So, would I buy the new edition? No, I wouldn't. It's just way too expensive. I'd find a library that has one. My sympathies go out to any student who has this book required in a course and a real strict professor to enforce the rules. I also note that the book can be rented, and, for most students, that would be the way to go. If you're going to become a professional planetary geologist, then go ahead and buy the book.

    Gary Peterson

  • The fact that the publishers can charge students $200 for a one semester black and white textbook is outrageous, and borderline unethical in my opinion. Though it looks like the price is coming down a bit. Having said that, this is the only acceptable textbook I know of that teaches Planetary Astronomy at a level that is above introductory astronomy, but below the graduate level. The textbook is reasonably thorough, although there are the noticeable omissions, given all of the advances made in the last five years since the textbook's publishing. The author is clearly knowledgable on the subject matter, though he shows an obvious bias arising from his growing up in the 60s and 70s when putting people on the moon and envisioning human colonies in space was the forefront of astronomy technology. Overall, the content of the book is decent. The chapters consist of text on planetary physics facts and theories, with intermittent math sections that explain the physics in more quantitative terms. There are a few typos and factual errors. In summary, there is effectively no competitive textbook out there that can match this one, despite all of its drawbacks, including the obscene price tag.

  • The first time I read this book was when one of my graduate teachers asked me to review it. While he thought it to basic for graduate-level work, I have used this book ever since, for students of all ages. Well written and illustrated with black-&-white pictures as well as the author's own well-respected artwork, it covers so much in such a small book it's hard to believe. The appendix of plantary data is up-to-date & comprehensive, lacking only some of the more esoteric elements (like the moment of inertia factor and J2 moment - if you don't know what those are, you won't miss them). Best at an undergraduate level, no math is required; all the math is set aside in boxes from the text, ready to use when the reader is ready but not required for a firm understanding of the subject at hand. And while it's clearly written as a textbook, it's far better reading than your average college text on the subject. While there are many "overview" books on the market, this is one of the best in my opinion; while I like and use more flashy texts like "The New Solar System", this is the one that I go back to again & again to review the basics or perform a simple calculation.

  • I bought this used & it was in better condition than what I expected. Great book to add to our Astronomy curriculum that I am building.