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ePub Lives of the Planets: A Natural History of the Solar System download

by Richard Corfield

ePub Lives of the Planets: A Natural History of the Solar System download
Author:
Richard Corfield
ISBN13:
978-0465028511
ISBN:
0465028519
Language:
Publisher:
Basic Books; Reprint edition (April 3, 2012)
Category:
Subcategory:
Astronomy & Space Science
ePub file:
1427 kb
Fb2 file:
1805 kb
Other formats:
azw lit mobi txt
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
786

A "natural history" of the "lives of planets" would imply an evolutionary treatment much different than what the . Again, at the end of the book, some type of illustration on the solar system as it stands today would have helped through the final chapter

A "natural history" of the "lives of planets" would imply an evolutionary treatment much different than what the author generally delivered - a mostly technical and political history of exploration programs. More specifically, Corfield takes a few wrong turns while attempting a pan-scientific focus, particularly in the chapter on the earth and the moon. Again, at the end of the book, some type of illustration on the solar system as it stands today would have helped through the final chapter. I think that the information flow is quite good, but the delivery could use a little work.

Lives of the Planets book. As a youngster, the history of the earth and the differences and similarities with the other solar system bodies was a source of wonder

Lives of the Planets book. As a youngster, the history of the earth and the differences and similarities with the other solar system bodies was a source of wonder. New moons were being discovered and many of the familiar objects were being found to be quite strange. It is this sense of wonder that effuses through the story of the different planets.

The Silent Landscape: The Scientific Voyage of HMS Challenger. Lives of the Planets: A Natural History of the Solar System". Retrieved 15 October 2011.

Lives of the Planets describes a scientific field in the midst of a revolution Placing our current understanding in historical context, Richard Corfield explores the seismic shifts in planetary astronomy and probes why we must change our perspective o. .

Lives of the Planets describes a scientific field in the midst of a revolution. Planetary science has mainly been a descriptive science, but it is becoming increasingly experimental. The space probes that went up between the 1960s and 1990s were primarily generalists-they collected massive amounts of information so that scientists could learn what questions to pursue. Placing our current understanding in historical context, Richard Corfield explores the seismic shifts in planetary astronomy and probes why we must change our perspective of our place in the universe.

It is excellent book. It is excellent book. com User, December 4, 2007. LIVES OF THE PLANETS: A NATURAL HISTORY OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM offers a survey of the most recent advances in astronomy which are leading into new areas of experimental science.

5 books of Richard Corfield. Books of Richard Corfield. The Silent Landscape. The history and science of HMS Challenger's world-­girdling voyage seen from a twentieth century perspective. More . Book rate: 1 downloads. In a sweeping look into the manifold objects inhabiting the depths of space, Lives of the Planets delves into the mythology and the knowledge humanity has built over the ages.

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Lives of the Planets describes a scientific field in the midst of a revolution. With the purchase of Kobo VIP Membership, you're getting 10% off and 2x Kobo Super Points on eligible items. Your Shopping Cart is empty. There are currently no items in your Shopping Cart. Placing our current understanding in historical context, Richard Corfield explores the seismic shifts in planetary astronomy and probes why we must change our perspective of our place in the universe

Lives of the Planets describes a scientific field in the midst of a revolution. In our era of extraordinary discovery, this is the first comprehensive survey of this new understanding and the history of how we got here.

Richard Corfield in his book Lives of the Planets †A Natural History of the Solar System wonderfully succeeds in.Apparently trying to counter this morass of the disinterested, Corfield sweeps through the solar system in a fine literary journey.

Richard Corfield in his book Lives of the Planets †A Natural History of the Solar System wonderfully succeeds in making such a translation. For the average graduate of our primary schooling system, there’s little unknown about the solar system. Using simple but entertaining words, he takes a planet by planet approach.

Lives of the Planets is a sweeping tour of our solar system, from the sun and demoted Pluto, to the Kuiper Belt and beyond the edge of the interstellar void. From the Neolithic computer that is Stonehenge to Galileo's telescope to Kepler's latest search for life on other planets, Richard Corfield deftly describes the colorful history of humanity's unfolding discovery of our solar system's secrets.

In this era of unprecedented discovery, Lives of the Planets is a comprehensive survey of our growing knowledge and the history of how we got here.

  • Excellent book!

  • I needed a book for a book report I was doing. I am also not an astrophysicist, so I was extremely happy that this was such an easy book to read and understand. It gave a fairly comprehensive overview of where we have come with exploration since the beginning of the space age. I enjoyed it.

  • I read this book in two days. It's a wonderful book: chock full of information, written in a conversational way and sprinkled with the perfect amount of both jokes and sentiments that will really make you think. Bonus: there's a picture of one of Saturn's moons which looks eerily like the Death Star.

  • I can see why people say this has a misleading title , and why intellectual snobs don't like it. Its a really great top level summary of the exploration of our universe - each chapter is a different planet/object Sun, Mercury etc. and the latest theory of the nature/history of each. I've just been to Cape Kennedy so am a late convert to space ... and this is just great for someone like me. Very easy to read ... nice structure ... i.e. a chapter per planet - so you can skip around if you like - its a bit like a collection of short stories ... good intro for dummies (like moi)

  • R. Corfield describes development of our knowledge about solar system and gives recent information on research of the planets. It is excellent book.

  • What a disappointment. only a few pages into the book Corfield launches into a daitribe against climate science. He starts with an ad hominum attack on climate scientists that could easily be mistaken as coming from one of the usual cadre of popular denialists. He ends it with the statement that sunspot activity "warms the earth's surface the the SAME (emphasis mine) extent as greenhouse gas emissions". While there is some wriggle room with how to interpret this somewhat vague statement, if it were true, the recent solar minimum would have canceled out the increase in greenhouse gases, and we would be left with a flat temperature trend, which is not the case. Otherwise, the book does have some interesting information about historical space missions to the planets but little about the composition/attributes of the planets themselves. This book is going off to the library where hopefully someone else can make their own assessment.

  • The title and subtitle of this book are quite curious and one has to wonder if they were coined by the publisher and not the author. A "natural history" of the "lives of planets" would imply an evolutionary treatment much different than what the author generally delivered - a mostly technical and political history of exploration programs. More specifically, Corfield takes a few wrong turns while attempting a pan-scientific focus, particularly in the chapter on the earth and the moon. There, Corfield covers alternatives to mainstream biological theory for some reason, and then closes the chapter with an unnecessary debunking of the solar system's lamest conspiracy theory - moon landing denial. Overall, except for the final chapter on Pluto and the mysterious mini-planets beyond, there is little new astronomical information in this book, though it is a pretty readable compendium of knowledge as of 2007. Despite these flaws the book is still enjoyable and offers plenty of coverage of the development of the various instruments and spacecraft that have built our knowledge of the solar system, which will satisfy more engineering-oriented readers. For those interested in an approachable update on the latest knowledge of our fascinating solar system, this book is a mostly rewarding experience. But for knowledgeable readers who may be looking for new revelations, or unique coverage as implied by the title and subtitle, this book doesn't have much to add to our knowledge. [~doomsdayer520~]

  • As a kid, I loved the space race and anything having to do with outer space. Then I went to college and took an astronomy course that could not have been any more uninteresting. Since then, I never wanted to read anything about it again. But 30 years later, I saw this new book at the library and decided that maybe with all of the updated information and a new perspective; I could enjoy the subject again.

    The author has created an interesting premise. That the planets are living and changing as does our knowledge about them. They start as one undefined item and then as we learn about them, they take on another life. The book is clearly meant for the non-scientific, however, that becomes a somewhat difficult goal as the author uses many terms that are not explained nor defined - i.e. The sun has a core that is .2 solar radii - what the heck is a solar radii? Then in a wonderful explanation of Stonehenge, he fails to provide any illustration that would really make the discussion meaningful. Likewise the discussion on the stars and their characteristics (aka HR graphing). Why not place an illustration that would make everything clear?

    There is quite a bit of information on the various unmanned space probes and probably too much detail on them, but he does keep it interesting with anecdotal stories of his own travails. Additionally, by keeping us informed of upcoming dates for probes that were launched several years ago, it gives you perspective on the amount of time it takes to launch and then how much time must pass before the information is gathered. The author is clearly showing his roots with all of the details, but without the details, something would be missing.

    There is much that is very well done in this book and there is much that is not so well done. But overall, I'm very glad that I read it and it has again piqued my interest in the solar system and planets. Some of the information is so fascinating that I want to hear more about it, but there is, of course, no more information to be had. Again, at the end of the book, some type of illustration on the solar system as it stands today would have helped through the final chapter. I think that the information flow is quite good, but the delivery could use a little work.