mostraligabue
» » The Mismeasure of Man (Revised Expanded)

ePub The Mismeasure of Man (Revised Expanded) download

by Stephen Jay Gould

ePub The Mismeasure of Man (Revised  Expanded) download
Author:
Stephen Jay Gould
ISBN13:
978-0393314250
ISBN:
0393314251
Language:
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company; Revised & Expanded edition (June 17, 1996)
Category:
Subcategory:
Biological Sciences
ePub file:
1481 kb
Fb2 file:
1595 kb
Other formats:
txt lrf azw lit
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
740

The mismeasure of man. Revised and Expanded. Hen’s teeth and horse’s toes.

The mismeasure of man. Further Reflections in Natural History. I eventually decided on The Mismeasure of Man because the essence of my book, in a paradoxical way that conferred staying power over these fifteen years since initial publication, lies in its limitation of scope. The Mismeasure of Man is not fundamentally about the general moral turpitude of fallacious biological arguments in social settings (as my original and broader title from Darwin would have implied).

About the Author In The Mismeasure of Man, Gould yields perspectives on three centuries of race and racism, and how men of the fledgling school of psychology attempted to qualify an. .

Stephen Jay Gould (1941-2002) was the Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology and Professor of Geology at Harvard University. He published over twenty books, received the National Book and National Book Critics Circle Awards, and a MacArthur Fellowship. In The Mismeasure of Man, Gould yields perspectives on three centuries of race and racism, and how men of the fledgling school of psychology attempted to qualify and quantify their new science by half baked theory and methodology followed by bastardizing the intent of Binet’s intelligence testing. Binet said intelligence cannot be abstracted as a single number.

In The Mismeasure of Man, Stephen Jay Gould examines the manner in.He published over twenty books, received the National Book and National. Библиографические данные. The Mismeasure of Man (Revised and Expanded). Издание: исправленное.

Электронная книга "The Mismeasure of Man (Revised and Expanded)", Stephen Jay Gould. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Mismeasure of Man (Revised and Expanded)" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The Mismeasure of Man is a 1981 book by paleontologist Stephen Jay Gould. The book is both a history and critique of the statistical methods and cultural motivations underlying biological determinism, the belief that the social and economic differences between human groups-primarily races, classes, and sexes-arise from inherited, inborn distinctions and that society, in this sense, is an accurate reflection of biology.

When published in 1981, The Mismeasure of Man was immediately hailed .

The Mismeasure of Man (Revised and Expanded) by Stephen Jay Gould and Publisher W. W. Norton & Company. Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9780393340402, 0393340406. When published in 1981, The Mismeasure of Man was immediately hailed as a masterwork, the ringing answer to those who would classify people, rank them according to their supposed genetic gifts and limits.

Books related to The Mismeasure of Man (Revised & Expanded).

Further, he has added five essays on questions of The Bell Curve in particular and on race, racism, and biological determinism in general. Books related to The Mismeasure of Man (Revised & Expanded).

The Mismeasure of Man book.

Assignment (two- page reaction paper due on first day of discussion) Week Five: II.

THE MISMEASURE OF MAN Revised and Expanded

THE MISMEASURE OF MAN Revised and Expanded. HEN'S TEETH AND HORSE'S TOES Further Reflections in Natural History. THE FLAMINGO'S SMILE Reflections in Natural History. I e v e n t u a l l y d e c i d e d on The Mismeasure of Man b e c a u s e t h e es-sence of my book, in a paradoxical way that conferred staying power over these fifteen years since initial publication, lies in its limitation of s c o p e. The Mismeasure of Man is n o t f u n d a m e n t a l l y a b o u t the general moral turpitude of fallacious biological arguments in social settings (as my original and broader title from Darwin would have implied).

The definitive refutation to the argument of The Bell Curve.

When published in 1981, The Mismeasure of Man was immediately hailed as a masterwork, the ringing answer to those who would classify people, rank them according to their supposed genetic gifts and limits.

And yet the idea of innate limits―of biology as destiny―dies hard, as witness the attention devoted to The Bell Curve, whose arguments are here so effectively anticipated and thoroughly undermined by Stephen Jay Gould. In this edition Dr. Gould has written a substantial new introduction telling how and why he wrote the book and tracing the subsequent history of the controversy on innateness right through The Bell Curve. Further, he has added five essays on questions of The Bell Curve in particular and on race, racism, and biological determinism in general. These additions strengthen the book's claim to be, as Leo J. Kamin of Princeton University has said, "a major contribution toward deflating pseudo-biological 'explanations' of our present social woes."

  • Gould is a terrific writer when on the right subjects, neatly and concisely laying out in a series of essays originally written as magazine columns some interesting trivia. When he sticks to evolution, he's incredible. When he veers in to the history of science, he can be uneven and long-winded, and the forays in to geology are largely pointless. When discussing the period from Darwin's first publishing of his theory to the widespread acceptance over the course of a generation, he focuses too much on one or two unimportant characters and misses the forest for the trees.
    Which is a shame. The early chapters are great fun to read, and offer great insight in to how adaptation works. But unlike, say, Dawkins, Gould wanders about in an uneven fashion. That's expected somewhat in a book that is a collection of magazine pieces written over many years, unlike a purpose-written book. But some of these feel like an idea that had been sitting in a drawer for many years, he decided to write something about it, but didn't really have much to say. A good editor could have cleaned that up, but perhaps that would not have left enough material for a book.

  • This volume is a collection of Gould's earlier essays for the New York Museum of Natural History. They reflect his marvelous insight into the heart of current arguments in evolution studies, his knowledge of the history of the subject, and his take on life in general. The Panda's Thumb, entitled from one of these essays, is not quite as witty as his later works are, but his personable style and conversational approach make the book very readable.
    One of the more interesting topics included is his discussion of the 19th Century rationale for prejudice against women and individuals of non-Western cultures. I found the very circular reasoning on the correlation between brain size and intellect and the misbegotten comparison of developmentally delayed individuals with individuals of other races particularly informative. The same kind of reasoning appears to be enjoying a destructive renaissance among social biologists today, most notably the authors of the notorious Bell Curve. The dissection of this type of faulty reasoning by an expert is instructive and a process well worth learning oneself and teaching to young people.
    Some of the more admirable of Gould's writing habits, and well displayed in this book, are his ability to give fair voice to the opposition, his acknowledgement of the work of others, and his capacity to find value even in the faulty work of others. The latter is well demonstrated in his discussion of the 19th Century effort to locate a representative of a basic life form, a link between the living and the inert. In this essay he shows that good science is part hard work, part individual brilliance, and part being able to say "I was wrong in my thinking here."
    The casual, approachable style, the brilliant and open mind, the logical approach to argument all make this an excellent book for anyone but would definitely make it a good book for high school students to learn the process of critical thought.

  • I love the way Gould gets to the heart of things and explains his arguments in an easy to understand way. I highly recommend this and any of his books to enlighten your knowledge of many subjects. I am not saying he is the final authority on any of these subjects but after reading him, I always feel I am better off for putting in the time to read his books.

  • The Mismeasure of Man Stephen Jay Gould

    The late prolific writer of natural history and natural selection concludes his The Mismeasure of Man with a line from Darwin,”If the misery of our poor be caused not by the laws of nature, but by out institutions, great is our sin.”

    In The Mismeasure of Man, Gould yields perspectives on three centuries of race and racism, and how men of the fledgling school of psychology attempted to qualify and quantify their new science by half baked theory and methodology followed by bastardizing the intent of Binet’s intelligence testing. Binet said “intelligence cannot be abstracted as a single number. IQ is a helpful device for identifying children in need of aid, not a dictate of inevitable biology.”
    Much of Gould’s manuscript concentrates on those, much to the contrary of Binet’s intent, who carried intelligence testing and ratings to obscene levels.

    Gould explains and refutes the examples of statistical analysis used by the early to mid 20th century psychologists, which formed the basis for the Herrnstein and Murray 1994 work, The Bell Curve. Gould writes in regard to The Bell Curve, “So long as people remain on the top of the Social heaps by accident of a noble name or parental wealth, and so long as members of despised castes cannot rise, whatever their talents, social stratification will not reflect intellectual merit.” Though quite often long in word, Gould attacks and documents how this intellectual racism has and continues to inject itself into our culture.

    Gould analyzes how “passive acceptance of common wisdom, of upper class Victorian males” evolved into “potent and evil nonsense that passed for certain knowledge,” and the repercussions that have historically manifested themselves. This became all too apparent with certain ethnic groups, Jewish refugees from Central Europe in particular, wishing to escape the coming Nazi holocaust, who sought to emigrate, were refused entry due to “eugenic propaganda”due to quotas based upon intelligence testing.

    Gould was a prolific writer, whose voice, now absent, is needed more than ever.
    The Mismeasure of Man, at times is a tough read, in particular the sections covering statistics and factor analysis, but Gould enables the reader to understand the continual fallacy of effort to quantify intelligence with a single number, and how this has affected us historically, and continues to do so today.

  • Wonderfully written and thought provoking. Although I do not necessarily agree with all of Mr. Gould's opinions, he provides good arguments and interesting facts. A must read for anyone with a keen interest in evolutionary biology.

  • Always good reading

  • Even though some of the chapters may sound a bit esoteric, every single one teaches us something interesting and valuable about evolution. Gould's approach is always pragmatic, full of common sense.