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by Clara Pinto-Correia

ePub Return of the Crazy Bird: The Sad, Strange Tale of the Dodo download
Author:
Clara Pinto-Correia
ISBN13:
978-1441931801
ISBN:
1441931805
Language:
Publisher:
Copernicus; Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 2003 edition (October 29, 2010)
Category:
Subcategory:
Biological Sciences
ePub file:
1241 kb
Fb2 file:
1305 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
554

Pinto-Correia skillfully weaves the tale of the discovery, exploitation, and extinction of the dodo and the closely related Rodrigues and Réunion Solitaires of the Mascarene Islands.

Pinto-Correia skillfully weaves the tale of the discovery, exploitation, and extinction of the dodo and the closely related Rodrigues and Réunion Solitaires of the Mascarene Islands. the author has produced a readable, sometimes fascinating, history of the multiple discoveries of the islands by European nations. Harris, CHOICE, June, 2003). Pinto-Correia presents an excellent history of one of the most famous extinct birds, the dodo, and the two allied species found only in the Mascarene Island. .

I have read a lot on the dodo, but I'm afraid this wasn't one of the better books. Half of the book is not actually about dodos but deals with Portugese and Dutch shipping and history - the dodo isn't really mentioned in depth until a few chapters in, and then it is faffed about with and dragged out on very little information. Sadly disappointing as there are so few resources on the topic, but perhaps of interest to people who aren't so keen on the dodo details. As above, I would recommend Fuller or even Strickland.

Pinto-Correia begins the book by looking at the widespread fascination with strange creatures as found in the maps, myths, and histories of The Dodo became extinct less than a century after its discovery by the European colonizers

Pinto-Correia begins the book by looking at the widespread fascination with strange creatures as found in the maps, myths, and histories of The Dodo became extinct less than a century after its discovery by the European colonizers. However, it also left an indelible mark on the European imagination. It is this tale of how the Dodo came to occupy such a prominent space in Western culture that takes up Clara Pinto-Correia’s attention in Return of the Crazy Bird: The Sad, Strange Tale of the Dodo.

And by the end of the nineteenth century, all that remained of what Portuguese explorers called the ¿crazy bird¿ was a patchwork . The Dodo went from being newly discovered to extinction in less than a hundred years.

And by the end of the nineteenth century, all that remained of what Portuguese explorers called the ¿crazy bird¿ was a patchwork of tall tales, contradictory reports, incompatible illustrations, and fragments of feather and bone. The flightless, odd-looking bird was seen for the first time by Europeans and then annihilated by Europeans in the course of the seventeenth century.

Using the history of the concept of extinction with the dodo as a case study, Pinto-Correia carefully weaves together story fragments to give a cohesive eye-opening.

Using the history of the concept of extinction with the dodo as a case study, Pinto-Correia carefully weaves together story fragments to give a cohesive eye-opening view of 17th century exploration and the grave ramifications it had for the survival and extinction of many species

Using the history of the concept of extinction with the dodo as a case study, Pinto-Correia carefully weaves together story fragments to give a cohesive . Clara Pinto-Correia is the author of the best-selling The Ovary of Eve.

Using the history of the concept of extinction with the dodo as a case study, Pinto-Correia carefully weaves together story fragments to give a cohesive eye-opening view of 17th century exploration and the grave ramifications it had for the survival and extinction of many species.

By Clara PintoCorreia. New York: SpringerVerlag. xv + 216 p; il. index.

What can the demise of the dodo tell modern society? How has our view of the world changed? Strong writing, powered by lively historical anecdotes and sober insights into human behavior, makes this beautifully illustrated book a page-turner to the end. 25 illustrations. Return of the Crazy Bird.

Using the history of the concept of extinction with the dodo as a case study, Pinto-Correia carefully weaves together story fragments to give a cohesive eye-opening view of 17th century exploration and the grave ramifications it had for the survival and extinction of many species. More importantly, she shows us the intellectual underpinnings of the old view that it was acceptable for some animals to die out. Within this narrative, we can see what the modern view of the dodo tells us about the history of our changing understanding and valuation of nature and our place in it. Strong writing, powered by lively historical anecdotes and sober insights into human behavior, makes this beautifully illustrated book a page-turner to the end.
  • At a young age, the author Clara Pinto-Correia heard about the long extinct dodo and became fascinated by the bird's fate. The end result is a well-researched and well-written text that takes the reader from the shores of Europe to a small chain of islands where the dodo and it's genetic cousins made their homes.
    Sadly, the dodo and it's genetic cousins were doomed to extinction with the arrival of Europeans (starting with the Portuguese). The plump, flightless animals were slow breeders with a single offspring per mating season and no natural enemies. Add ravenous creatures (Homo sapiens included) into their safe mircosphere and diaster was assured.
    Pinto-Correia traces the few captive dodos in Euorpe and the fates of their remains. Now, the only things the modern world has of the dodo are a scattering of bones, some paintings and sketches and the cultural understanding that to be a dodo is to be doomed.
    A must read for the natural history reader or devotee.

  • Subtitle of this book is "The Sad, Strange Tale of the Dodo" and so it is. Pinto-Correia mixes a bit of humor with a pleasant writing style, lots of relevant history and geography, and a sad shake of her head about how rapacious humans are.
    It was a marvelously heady period in Europe's awakening after intellectual dark days and Pinto-Correia gives the reader a sense of that emergence. On one level the dodo is a symbol of an eden found and lost on three small islands along the way to spices and riches. In their rush to gather spices, riches and glory men plundered these islands and left them poorer - the islands' inhabitants were decimated and became fearful, the men did not realize what a treasure they had found.
    The reader can assign other levels to the story as Pinto-Correia unfolds it. Science came into its own during these centuries, and the dodo's discovery and extinction is a grand example of the days when alchemy gave way to chemistry and astrology became astronomy. Natural history developed as well, with taxonomy seemingly in the forefront. The dodo was classified and plunged into first one species then another, had little to prove that it even existed, finally was declared extinct - all in less than 100 years.
    Pinto-Correia packs information about the hapless bird and the European humans of the era into this book. The reader learns painlessly while realizing this is a learning experience.
    For this reader Return of the Crazy Bird is a grand vacation read, easy to pick up and put down without losing the thread of the story.

  • I have read a lot on the dodo, but I'm afraid this wasn't one of the better books. Half of the book is not actually about dodos but deals with Portugese and Dutch shipping and history - the dodo isn't really mentioned in depth until a few chapters in, and then it is faffed about with and dragged out on very little information. Sadly disappointing as there are so few resources on the topic, but perhaps of interest to people who aren't so keen on the dodo details. As above, I would recommend Fuller or even Strickland.