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ePub Evolution, Development, and the Predictable Genome download

by David L. Stern

ePub Evolution, Development, and the Predictable Genome download
Author:
David L. Stern
ISBN13:
978-1936221011
ISBN:
1936221012
Language:
Publisher:
W. H. Freeman; 1st edition (March 1, 2010)
Category:
Subcategory:
Biological Sciences
ePub file:
1628 kb
Fb2 file:
1731 kb
Other formats:
lit docx doc txt
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
952

How does development influence evolution? This book explores the idea that development and evolution interact to make genetic evolution predictable. Genetic evolution appears to be somewhat predictable.

How does development influence evolution? This book explores the idea that development and evolution interact to make genetic evolution predictable. The penultimate chapter presents a new way of viewing development—through pathworks—that clarifies the role of development in evolution. This predictability emerges from the structure of developmental regulatory networks and from evolutionary processes that occur in populations.

David Stern’s book, Evolution, Development, and the Predict- Throughout this rich history has been an important interplay between analysis of variation and the development of newer and more refined models of the evolutionary processes.

David Stern’s book, Evolution, Development, and the Predict-. and developmental biology. The synthesis that Stern hopes to. accomplish is as difficult as it is necessary. Throughout this rich history has been an important interplay between analysis of variation and the development of newer and more refined models of the evolutionary processes that shape variation within and between populations over time.

Bottom line: Stern has interesting ideas and the book as a whole is a good introduction and overview of the factors that affect evolution on the pathway and network level, but the final product is a less satisfying "grand unified theory" than one would expect given the title of the book and the promise of the first chapters.

David Stern's Evolution, Development, & the Predictable Genome is an original, timely, and articulate contribution toward that goal. This is essential reading for anyone interested in evolutionary biology.

Подписчиков: 2 ты. себе: Biologist. Author of Evolution, Development & The Predictable Genome.

In Evolution, Development, and the Predictable Genome, David Stern sets out to draw evolutionary biology and developmental biology together by cutting through the differences that divide the disciplines and by revealing their deeper similarities

Toward Tracing the Tangled Paths of Genes During Development. The book is divided into eight chapters. In the first two introductory chapters, Stern presents the logic for marrying evolutionary studies with development

Toward Tracing the Tangled Paths of Genes During Development. Evolution, Development, & the Predictable Genome, by David L. Stern. Greenwood Village: Roberts and Company Publishers, 2011. In the first two introductory chapters, Stern presents the logic for marrying evolutionary studies with development. Chapters 3–5 deal with three important, but neglected, genetic concepts: dominance, pleiotropy, and epistasis.

Genome Growth and the Evolution of the Genotype-Phenotype Map". Evolution, development, & the predictable genome. Greenwood Village, Colorado: Roberts and Company Publishers. In Banzhaf, . Eeckman, F. H. (ed. Evolution and Biocomputation: Computational Models of Evolution.

Chicago Distribution Center. Abstracting and indexing. Advertise in QRB. Previous Article. Polydactyly in Development, Inheritance, and Evolution. Greenwood Village (Colorado): Roberts and Company Publishers. xvi + 264 . il. index. ISBN: 978-1-936221-01-1. Lange et al. 1427 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637. The University of Chicago Press Books.

Then, he presents to a new way of thinking about development – backwards – to clarify how the mechanisms of development influence evolution; likewise, he argues that population history influences how.

For too long, efforts to synthesize evolution and development have failed to build a united view of the origins and evolution of biological diversity. In this groundbreaking book, David Stern sets out to draw evolutionary biology and developmental biology together by cutting through the differences that divide the disciplines and by revealing their deeper similarities. He draws upon the insights of generations of evolutionary biologists and scores of developmental biologists to build a solid foundation for future investigation of the genetic and developmental causes of diversity. Along the way, and in plain English, he explicates many of the guiding principles of evolution, population genetics, and developmental biology. Each chapter offers a clear review of fundamental principles, together with thoughtprovoking ideas that will be tested only with data emerging from current and future studies. With the basic principles established, he then offers a new way of thinking about development—backwards—to clarify precisely how the mechanisms of development influence evolution. In the same spirit, he takes a fresh look at evolution in populations, arguing that population history influences precisely how developmental mechanisms evolve. Both Stern's new perspective on development and his reassessment of the role of populations leads to the surprising conclusion that the evolution of genomes appears to be predictable. Stern argues that developmental biology and evolutionary biology are intertwined: it is impossible to understand one of them fully without understanding the other. This book provides a clear and wide-ranging introduction to evolution and development for the basic reader; graduate students will be introduced to the cutting-edge of research in evolutionary developmental biology; and experts in evolution or development will receive both an uncomplicated introduction to the other discipline and an abundance of new, provocative ideas.
  • Very challenging read, but equally rewarding. Reading this book was the first time during my education that I thought I was really thinking like a scientist, instead of just a science major. I recommend a minor background in evolution. If you struggle with the book, there are many great videos online that can give you the necessary background.

  • May need a little bit of a evolution background, but Dr. Stern does a great job of breaking down each chapter in a simplistic manner.