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ePub A Primate's Memoir (A Neuroscientist's Unconventional Life Among the Baboons) download

by Robert M. Sapolsky

ePub A Primate's Memoir (A Neuroscientist's Unconventional Life Among the Baboons) download
Author:
Robert M. Sapolsky
ISBN13:
978-1841975078
ISBN:
0224061216
Language:
Publisher:
Scribner; 1st edition (2001)
Category:
Subcategory:
Biological Sciences
ePub file:
1836 kb
Fb2 file:
1362 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
663

Robert Sapolsky, the author of Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers and other popular books on animal and human .

Robert Sapolsky, the author of Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers and other popular books on animal and human behavior, decided early in life to become a primatologist, volunteering at the American Museum of Natural History and badgering his high school principal to let him study Swahili to prepare for travel in Africa. When he set out to conduct fieldwork as a young graduate student, though, Sapolsky found that life among a Kenyan baboon troop was markedly different from his earlier bookish studies.

Spending three months of every year in Kenya, Sapolsky witnesses its many political changes, makes lasting friendships with some of the locals, Категория.

A Primate's Memoir book. In the tradition of Jane Goodall and Dian Fossey, Robert Sapolsky, a foremost science writer and recipient of a MacArthur Genius Grant, tells the mesmerizing story of his twenty-one years in remote Kenya with a troop of Savannah baboons.

Robert M. Sapolsky is the author of several works of nonfiction, including A Primate's Memoir, The Trouble with Testosterone, and Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers. He is a professor of biology and neurology at Stanford University and the recipient of a MacArthur Foundation genius grant. He lives in San Francisco. Библиографические данные. A Primate's Memoir: A Neuroscientist's Unconventional Life Among the Baboons.

Электронная книга "A Primate's Memoir: A. .Robert M.

Электронная книга "A Primate's Memoir: A Neuroscientist's Unconventional Life Among the Baboons", Robert M. Sapolsky.

Originally published: Scribner, 2001. From the author of Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers. Over two decades, Sapolsky survives culinary atrocities, gunpoint encounters, and a surreal kidnapping, while witnessing the encroachment of the tourist mentality on the farthest vestiges of unspoiled Africa.

Robert Sapolsky, the author of Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers and other popular books on animal and human behavior, decided early in.A Primate's Memoir : A Neuroscientist's Unconventional Life among the Baboons. by Robert M.

Robert Sapolsky, the author of Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers and other popular books on animal and human behavior, decided early in life to become a primatologist,.

In the tradition of Jane Goodall and Dian Fossey, Robert Sapolsky, a.

In the tradition of Jane Goodall and Dian Fossey, Robert Sapolsky, a foremost science writer and recipient of a MacArthur Genius Grant, tells the mesmerizi.

A primate's memoir was merged with this page

A primate's memoir was merged with this page. 53 people like this topic.

Dust jacket worn, page edges tanned. Shipped from the U.K. All orders received before 3pm sent that weekday.
  • One of my MOST favorite books. Sapolsky writes very personal reactions and observations about the baboons he is studying, adds wonderfully dry wit and acknowledges his own shortcomings and eccentricities while teaching you a wealth of information about these animals. He also injects interesting commentaries about some of the local tribes he interacts with in Kenya. I bought and read this book years ago and loaned it to a friend, who never returned it. I so enjoyed the book the first time that I recently bought it again. Enjoyed it even more the second time, now my husband is thoroughly enjoying it, too. It is definitely a five star book!

  • RS had the wonderful privilege of observing and collecting data on his favorite type of animal. Sounds and read like heaven to me.
    I read a lot of the one star reviews and laugh. So the editing is bad, the book is isn't a text on the natural science of olive baboons, nor is it a good travel guide. It is the story of a guy with great curiosity towards nature, especially primates. Whether he is writing about baboons, his neighbors or himself he looks with the same curious, tolerant, distant observations that any good reporter or scientist brings to their work. Some get upset with his term "blacks" as if he also didn't use the term whities. lLOL
    Some reviews cast doubt over he could have really had these experiences, but any astute observer of this crazy world we live in knows truth is satisfyingly bizarre all on its own. Writing like this is the most entertaining of non fiction.

  • I read the Kindle version of this book, and although the book itself was a great journey through one scientist's study of baboons in Kenya (and along the way, a study of both the people of Kenya and other parts of Africa and the author's own evolution from young student to fully mature adult), the copy editing of this book was so bad that it caused the flow of the book to be damaged. Either missing or misplaced apostrophes, hundreds of typos (do they not use spell check when transforming a text into Kindle format?), including misspellings and garbled words, really interfered with the enjoyment of this book. The price, over $10, did not excuse this unprofessional presentation. At least if you buy the physical book, you can share it with many people. Not so the Kindle version, and I was appalled at the bad copy editing and the fact that Amazon would not be embarrassed to release it like this.

  • The author is absolutely entertaining, and this book is very informative as well as endearing. I had a passion for primates prior to reading this book, and after finishing the book I can say with 100% certainty that baboons are my favorite primate! The author illustrates these animals beautifully, and you likely won't be able to tear your eyes away from the book. I also watch/listen to Jordan Peterson, and I tend to recall parts of "A Primates Memoir" when JP talks about the "dominance hierarchy." I can't recommend this book enough!

  • Last year I stumbled on some photos of baby gorillas. Then I went down to the zoo to look at them. Cutest little buggers... And somehow, from there, from reading about gorillas, I stumbled on baboons. And found them, and their ways, even more interesting. I'd read several other books on baboons, before coming on this one...and what a joy this was to read!

    This was like reading about baboons, if Mark Twain had been doing the writing: the author's eye for humor, and his willingness to describe accurately, not just baboons, but also the people he came in contact with: he spares neither them, nor him, nor our own modern day sensibilities. I was laughing out loud, at him, at the baboons, and my own preconceptions.

    I don't give five stars, but this was just too good. I got it on Kindle, and liked it so much I just got through ordering a new paperback edition from Amazon. I didn't need it, and I'm kind of mobile in my old age, but I wanted this in my bookshelf, probably right next to my old Bukowski short stories ;-)

    A great book, and a writer I will now follow avidly

  • This was an excellent book about Baboons, Humans, Maasai tribesmen. Parts of the books make you laugh others make you weep. Robert Sapolsky has the knack taking you into Africa while you are sitting comfortably in your air conditioned home. Strongly recommend a second read

  • Great book! I was assigned this book to read for class, but I would highly recommend reading this just because! It is a great look into the world of primatology, and Saplosky does a fantastic job of introducing us to the world of baboons. Over the course of the book, not only did I learn many different things about baboons, ranging from their hierarchy to the issues they face in terms of conservation, but I also became emotionally attached to the characters in the book. I highly recommend!

  • Professor Sapolsky's scores a hit with his conversational and often humorous account of his many years in and around Africa studying baboons, and living among Africans. For a memoir, Sapolsky spent a relatively small amount of time talking about himself, and when he does his honesty is refreshing and encouraging. Sapolsky also provides the reader vignettes of Africa history, and considerable anthropological background on the rival factions in and around Kenya. His recounting of the widespread graft reminded me of Theodore Dalrymple's excellent essay After Empire, where freedom from the colonialist has been replaced by nepotism, tribal patronage, virulent racism, and obscenely corrupt governments.

    The reader never for a moment doubts Sapolsky's love for his baboons; his passion is evident is the workmanlike narrative of day to day troop life; the pecking order, and the social characteristics of baboon "society." Sapolsky also writes movingly of the tragedies of his beloved troop, and his favorite subjects.

    This is an excellent account written by a man with a passion for his work and is highly recommended.