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ePub Flower Confidential (Thorndike Nonfiction) download

by Amy Stewart

ePub Flower Confidential (Thorndike Nonfiction) download
Author:
Amy Stewart
ISBN13:
978-0786295234
ISBN:
0786295236
Language:
Publisher:
Thorndike Pr (May 16, 2007)
Category:
Subcategory:
Biological Sciences
ePub file:
1358 kb
Fb2 file:
1340 kb
Other formats:
txt lrf azw doc
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
379

Award-winning author Amy Stewart takes readers on an around-the-world, behind-the-scenes look at the flower industry and how it has sought-for better or worse-to achieve . Flower Confidential - Amy Stewart.

Award-winning author Amy Stewart takes readers on an around-the-world, behind-the-scenes look at the flower industry and how it has sought-for better or worse-to achieve perfection. She tracks down the hybridizers, geneticists, farmers, and florists working to invent, manufacture, and sell flowers that are bigger, brighter, and sturdier than anything nature can provide. Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill.

inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Flower Confidential is the third book by Amy Stewart that I've read, and probably the best. Though I did love her book on earthworms and all they do, The Earth Moved, and Wicked Plants, a book detailing dangerous plants with tongue-in-cheek theatrical dread, here she lays bare a passion for her subject she likely couldn't conceal if she tried. Fascinated by her insights on the tulip trade on the 17th century, I found her book and have had a very difficult time putting it down! It is truly a terrific read.

Flower Confidential book. In Flower Confidential, Amy Stewart takes us on an insightful, behind-the-scenes journey through the floral industry, following the chain from beginning to end, around the world

Flower Confidential book. In Flower Confidential, Amy Stewart takes us on an insightful, behind-the-scenes journey through the floral industry, following the chain from beginning to end, around the world. Along the way, we learn that flowers. From a geneticist’s lab in one of several countries to the breeders in the Netherlands to the growers in Ecuador, back to the Netherlands for auction or directly to a wholesaler in Miami, to a florist near you, the arrangement in your living room is well traveled, to say the least. She tracks down the hybridizers, geneticists, farmers, and florists working to invent, manufacture, and sell flowers that are bigger, brighter, and sturdier than anything nature can provide

In her engaging and scrupulously reported new book, Amy Stewart explains why my roses . Flower Confidential is investigative reporting of a gentle sort.

In her engaging and scrupulously reported new book, Amy Stewart explains why my roses seem to be going for a vase-life record. Like the tough tomatoes we’ve grown used to, flowers are now bred to travel great distances. My roses may look oddly waxen on the dining room table, but they performed very well as freight.

flower Confidential by Amy Stewart does something most professors only dream of doing: It makes flowers .

flower Confidential by Amy Stewart does something most professors only dream of doing: It makes flowers interesting-to a point, of course. The book captures the attention of the everyday person with legends of the first blue rose and the race to make the perfect flower. Despite the conversational approach to a usually tepid subject, sometimes science is just science.

This month author Amy Stewart joins Six Apart's Harold Check to discuss her new book, Flower Confidential, which was just released by Algonquin Books

This month author Amy Stewart joins Six Apart's Harold Check to discuss her new book, Flower Confidential, which was just released by Algonquin Books. It tells the inside story of the global flower business, from breeders to growers to brokers to florists and finally to the bouquet that you keep in a vase on your kitchen counter. Stewart blogs on TypePad at blog.

Amy Stewart Amy Stewart takes us inside the flower trade-from the hybridizers, who create .

Stewart explores the relevance of flowers in our lives and in our history, and in the process she reveals all that has been gained-and lost-by tinkering with nature.

Discusses how flower growers and sellers have changed their products to make them larger and more vibrant, and evaluates how this tinkering with nature has been both beneficial and detrimental to the cut flower industry.
  • I bought this book for Prof. Lieth's course at UC Davis. (PLS 06) The book was actually pretty interesting, coming from a chemistry major who dislikes most biology subjects. There are chapters which frame the overall flower selling market, and other chapters which go into depth about a single flower species (such as lilies) and overall the book makes you feel like a flower expert by the end. I enjoyed Amy Stewart's journalism style writing; it really seemed like she traveled all over the world in order to get some good juicy stories about flower businesses.

    If you are looking for advice on PLS 06, you can really pass the class without ever opening the book if you are a good test taker. I wouldn't advise doing this, because without this book you really won't learn much besides Prof. Lieth's lectures. I'd recommend going ahead of the class schedule for reading chapters and just knock out this whole book in a few sittings. Amy Stewart has good flow and it never really felt like she dragged on. It's nice that Prof. Lieth chose this book as opposed to a textbook, because it reads like a story.

  • Flower Confidential is the third book by Amy Stewart that I've read, and probably the best. Though I did love her book on earthworms and all they do, The Earth Moved, and Wicked Plants, a book detailing dangerous plants with tongue-in-cheek theatrical dread, here she lays bare a passion for her subject she likely couldn't conceal if she tried. She is moved, delighted ... heck, she is giddy about flowers. Describing their beauty, it's hard not to imagine her blushing herself.

    But she also digs deep, traveling to Ecuador, to massive flower auctions in Holland, to an upscale New York florist shop, an airport warehouse in Miami that functions as the main receiving center for Central and South American cut flowers, to California fields and flower carts and shops that inscribe words on the edges of rose petals. She plumbs through the history of the Star Gazer lily, turning a flower into a multi-generational story of its eccentric creator and the families that made it famous. She describes being towered over by roses with natural six-foot stems and seeing roses sunk into buckets of fumigants and flowers soaked in buckets of dye.

    As she does so, Stewart moves between big picture and precise detail so fluidly that Flower Confidential tucks all its education seamlessly into a rollicking tale. Well, as rollicking as flowers get, anyway. And to read Stewart, that's pretty rollicking indeed. For all the industrialization of the floral industry, as well as the problems that tend to come with industrialization (pollution, safety problems, dreary and repetitive work, the slow replacement of craftsmen by drones and artistry by undistinguished quality), for all her revelations of how unglamorously things often work behind the scenes, Stewart is forever being caught in the net of some flower's beauty, whether exquisite new hybrid or richly scented heirloom, spotted in high places or low, embroiling herself in what a flower means or should mean. She is candidly, unbashedly, perpetually vulnerable to being transported by their glory.

    A full-fledged subscriber to the idea of the symbolism and necessity of gifting, flowers mean more to her than they ever could to me. To her they are the gift that there is always room for in the spirit -- and on Valentine's Day, you'd better not be late!

    I can't say I'll ever believe in the importance of flowers the way Stewart does. In the near necessity of their specific kind of physical beauty, close at hand, in a well-lived life. But I have started growing lobellias and marigolds and nasturtiums and petunias and veronicas in the garden, and am learning little by little. The bees and moths and other pollinators love them. And for goodness sake, Amy sure loves them! I've tended to think of them as a fussy bit of clutter. But I'm becoming fond of them. If you're not there yet or on your way, Flower Confidential will do its darnedest to get you going, and is so wide-ranging and well-written that you're sure to enjoy the journey.

  • This is a fascinating book! I've never been an avid consumer of cut flowers, but I do enjoy plants and gardening. I heard an interview with the author on NPR a few years ago, was mesmerized, and this book has been on my to-read list ever since. It was worth the wait! I can honestly say that I will never look at a cut flower, a pre-packaged bouquet, and especially a rose, in the same way again. The story of the propagation, the selling and marketing is riveting.

    I knew large greenhouses existed, but the exact science, the exact control to produce the most perfect flowers available is something I was ignorant of. I also assumed that the flowers I buy in the grocery store were flowers as nature created them, not scientifically created perfections-upon-nature. It's truly astonishing the time, energy, and money that is funneled into what are simply flowers, but actually quite an economic powerhouse.

    While it may be easy to condemn these greenhouse freaks of nature, the author shows us they are just as beautiful, stunning, fragile, and glorious as the wildflowers in the field.

    I learned a lot from this book, but even more, I gained an immense appreciation of the flower industry and the travels and travails of every single cut flower stem that will enter into my life. Highly recommended.

  • Very informative peek into the world of commercial flower production. Americans would benefit from reading this to get dialed in to where their flowers come from and what is involved. Easy, uncomplicated read.

  • I purchased the Kindle edition of Flower Confidential after seeing Amy Stewart featured on the PBS special "The Botony of Desire". Fascinated by her insights on the tulip trade on the 17th century, I found her book and have had a very difficult time putting it down! It is truly a terrific read. I find Ms. Stewart's writing style very smooth and even paced. Granted, like many of the reviewers here, I have spent time in the industry (in my case as a designer for several years), so I may have been predispositioned to enjoy this book; but I know that even "laypeople" will come away with new found knowledge and an appreciation for this often overlooked industry. Definately worth a try!

  • The book came exactly as described.

  • A great read. Very inquisitive, quirky and informative. Amy is always a great creator of literature.

  • This was an excellent book to read! I enjoyed the writer's style and its easy to read format. The information that the Amy Stewart delivers in her book is truely eye opening. I never knew there was so much involved in making someones day with flowers! There is so much more involved than meets the eye. If you are a person interested in getting into the actual business of selling flowers or owning a flowers store this is a MUST read!