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ePub The Black Rhinos of Namibia: Searching for Survivors in the African Desert download

by Rick Bass

ePub The Black Rhinos of Namibia: Searching for Survivors in the African Desert download
Author:
Rick Bass
ISBN13:
978-0547055213
ISBN:
0547055218
Language:
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; 1 edition (August 7, 2012)
Category:
Subcategory:
Biological Sciences
ePub file:
1109 kb
Fb2 file:
1105 kb
Other formats:
lrf lit txt rtf
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
475

Black rhinos are not actually black

Black rhinos are not actually black. They are, however, giant animals with tiny eyes, feet the diameter of laundry baskets, and horns that are prized for both their aesthetic and medicinal qualities. Mr. Bass shifting his writing between his concern for his grizzlies in the USA and that of the black rhino in Namibia really drives home the need for our concerns for the environment and conservation.

Rick Bass travelled to Namibia with a desire to see the black rhinos in their natural habitat. This book initially fatigued me when I started it. Author Rick Bass was making me think too much and his style was a bit much for my mood. The book recounts that trip. The first half of the book seems to be about everything except rhinos. I couldn't see what the plight of the American grizzlies - being what he is most familiar with - had to do with the story of the rhinos in Namibia. He definitely errs on the side of being lyrical, which in this case sometimes clouds and obscures facts. I think I had been longing for something simple, and books about Africa rarely are.

Rick Bass first made a name for himself as a writer and seeker of rare, iconic animals, including the grizzlies and . RICK BASS is the author of many acclaimed works of fiction and nonfiction

Rick Bass first made a name for himself as a writer and seeker of rare, iconic animals, including the grizzlies and wolves of the American West. Now he's off on a new, far-flung adventure in the Namib of southwest Africa on the trail of another fascinating, vulnerable species. RICK BASS is the author of many acclaimed works of fiction and nonfiction. His first short story collection, The Watch, set in Texas, won the PEN/Nelson Algren Award, and his 2002 collection, The Hermit's Story, was a Los Angeles Times Best Book of the Year. The Lives of Rocks was a finalist for the Story Prize and was chosen as a Best Book of the Year by the Rocky Mountain News.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and . Black rhinos are not actually black. Rick Bass, who has long worn the uneasy mantle of both activist and hunter, traveled to Namibia to find black rhinos.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android.

Acclaimed nature writer Rick Bass takes us on a journey into the Namib Desert to follow a group of poachers-­turned-­conservationists as they track the endangered black rhinos through their ancient and harsh African homeland. Help us to make General-Ebooks better!

National Geographic Traveler Black rhinos are not actually black.

National Geographic Traveler Black rhinos are not actually black.

Rick Bass first made a name for himself as a writer and seeker of rare, iconic animals, including the grizzlies and wolves of the American West. The black rhino is a 3,000-pound, squinty-eyed giant that sports three-foot-long dagger horns, lives off poisonous plants, and goes for days without water.

Bass won The Story Prize for books published in 2016 for his collection of new and selected stories, For a Little While. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. He won the 1995 James Jones Literary Society First Novel Fellowship for his novel in progress, Where the Sea Used to Be. He was a finalist for the Story Prize in 2006 for his short story collection The Lives. He was a finalist for the 2008 National Book Critics Circle Award (autobiography) for Why I Came West (2009).

From one of our most gifted writers on the natural world comes a stunning exploration of a unique landscape and the improbable and endangered animal that makes its home there.Rick Bass first made a name for himself as a writer and seeker of rare, iconic animals, including the grizzlies and wolves of the American West. Now he’s off on a new, far-flung adventure in the Namib of southwest Africa on the trail of another fascinating, vulnerable species. The black rhino is a three-thousand-pound, squinty-eyed giant that sports three-foot-long dagger horns, lives off poisonous plants, and goes for days without water.Human intervention and cutting-edge conservation saved the rhinos—for now—from the brink of extinction brought on by poaching and war. Against the backdrop of one of the most ancient and harshest terrains on earth, Bass, with his characteristic insight and grace, probes the complex relationship between humans and nature and meditates on our role as both destroyer and savior.In the tradition of Peter Matthiessen’s The Tree Where Man Was Born, Bass captures a haunting slice of Africa, especially of the “black” rhinos that glow ghostly white in the gleaming sun.
  • Although it gets quite "wordy" at times, I really had no trouble visualizing his words and experience. I think it help to have a map of the area he is talking about to appreciate the book more. We are headed to Namibia in a few days, and I feel that this book will enrich that experience. He doesnt really encounter the rhino until 3/4 of the way through the book, but that is half of the fun. His descriptions of the other humans in his story are rich. I felt there was quite a bromance going on with one of the characters, in the end you find out why. You will be moved.
    Mr. Bass shifting his writing between his concern for his grizzlies in the USA and that of the black rhino in Namibia really drives home the need for our concerns for the environment and conservation.

  • I agree with previous reviews that said there is not much about rhinos or Namibia but plenty about the author's feelings. Definitely not a good source for anyone who is interested in Namibia or rhinos. Indeed, a rhino sighting doesn't even occur until page 150. I trudged through or skipped numerous sections filled with philosophical soul searching and rhetorical questions.

  • This is a philosophical treatise with the Namibia black rhinos as a central theme.

  • This was an interesting and informative read, a must for anyone travelling to Namibia or interested in the plight of the rhino.

  • "The Black Rhinos of Namibia" appear infrequently and fleetingly in this rambling reminiscence of a sojourn the author made to a rather small part of that country several years before the appearance of this book. The disparity of many of its passages suggests their having been culled from a journal to fit on pages among recollections of numerous times and places. The work is so distinctly personal as to manifest the author's conversations with himself - the essence of any good journal. The reader is taken wherever the author has been and treated to his innermost thoughts there, regardless of their disjunct and inchoate state. The appraisal of the book one renders is highly dependent upon one's expectations, objectives, prejudices.

    As a planner and leader of African wildlife safaris, I am concerned for the impression left on the reader who may aspire to see wildlife in Namibia or other African countries. The experience related by the author throughout much of the book requires considerable expense (or fortunate invitation) while offering rather long odds of realizing one's objective. In his Epilogue the author writes disparagingly of Etosha National Park where I've seen a black rhino with a young calf near a road when neither ran from the close encounter. Lodges in the heart of the park provide accommodation at reasonable cost, although I prefer Halali and Okaukuejo to Namutoni, the fort where the author and Dennis stayed. Park visitors are virtually assured of seeing far more wildlife by its roads and waterholes than by wandering the spaces of Damaraland. By all means experience the freedom of Namibia's vast open spaces, but to experience its black rhinos, do not eschew the 8,600 square mile "confines" of Etosha.

  • I've read and enjoyed some of Rick Bass's previous books, and I was really looking forward to this Vine selection. I have to say, I am a bit disappointed.

    Bass is as much a philosopher and poet as he is a nature writer, and there are passages in this book that are beautifully written. No surprise there. But the narrative kind of drifts around and never really builds any momentum.

    Bass goes to Namibia--an awesome, but unforgiving, environment--to seek out black rhinos and the people dedicated to trying to preserve them. Except for the fact that their horns aren't really horns, I knew nothing about rhinos when I opened this book, and I don't know much more now. OK: they're near-sighted, and they easily consume plants that are poisonous to humans. Every fifty pages you come upon those kinds of facts.

    And just as chimps have Jane Goodall, rhinos have their champions who understand the importance of developing the species profile into that of a "glamour animal," so that people (with money) realize the value of these magnificent animals before they vanish completely.

    I applaud Mr. Bass for helping that cause.

    Although Bass does embed some of his personal politics into this narrative. Like, you know all those greedy colonialists who invaded Africa and enslaved/killed millions of people to loot natural resources, then plunged the continent into decades of violent civil war, illiteracy and grinding poverty, and then set the stage for entire villages to be wiped out by AIDS? Bush's fault.

    Aside from that, Bass is duly impressed by the world that brought forth the rhino.

    If you LOVE either Rick Bass or rhinos, this is the book for you. But it won't draw you into "rhinoworld" the way John Vaillant's "The Tiger" brought those big cats to life. I don't know if there's a title like that out there, but there should be, because rhinos are truly amazing.

    This book did make me want to go to Namibia....for about a second. Then I remembered that I am not at all good with travel out in "the bush," as I prefer mid-range hotels near bowling alleys. And THEN I remembered that I live in Chicago, which has black rhinos at both the Lincoln Park AND Brookfield Zoos....so problem solved!!