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ePub Tasmanian Tiger: The Tragic Tale of How the World Lost Its Most Mysterious Predator download

by David Owen

ePub Tasmanian Tiger: The Tragic Tale of How the World Lost Its Most Mysterious Predator download
Author:
David Owen
ISBN13:
978-0801882609
ISBN:
0801882605
Language:
Publisher:
Johns Hopkins University Press (August 30, 2005)
Category:
Subcategory:
Biological Sciences
ePub file:
1218 kb
Fb2 file:
1557 kb
Other formats:
mobi lrf txt doc
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
243

The Tasmanian tiger became extinct in 1936. We learned how the thylacine got to Tasmania and how its Australian ancestors became extinct as well.

The Tasmanian tiger became extinct in 1936. While not a tiger or a feline at all, the Europeans who colonized Tasmania gave this striped marsupial predator its name because it resembled a creature they already knew. Zoologists prefer to use the term thylacine, as do I, so I will refer to it by that name. Owen wrote about marsupials in general and how they found home as well in North America. The story of the thylacine could not be told without also telling the story about the colonists and their campaign to eradicate it.

Tasmanian Tiger book. As a resource on the thylacine (aka the Tasmanian Tiger), David Owen's Thylacine: The Tragic Tale of the Tasmanian Tiger is absolutely fantastic

Tasmanian Tiger book. Once the world's largest marsupial predator, the doglike Tasmanian. As a resource on the thylacine (aka the Tasmanian Tiger), David Owen's Thylacine: The Tragic Tale of the Tasmanian Tiger is absolutely fantastic. Content-wise, there's very little that I feel is missing, and what is missing tends to be things that have occurred post-publication. For example, when discussing thylacine cloning, Owen says that it's hoped to be completed by 2010 – reading this in 2013 I'm aware that the deadline has been missed.

In Tasmanian Tiger, David Owen tells the tragic story of the thylacine, from its evolutionary origins . Once the world's largest marsupial predator, the doglike Tasmanian tiger (Thylacinus cynocephalus) ranged across Australia and as far north as New Guinea.

In Tasmanian Tiger, David Owen tells the tragic story of the thylacine, from its evolutionary origins and its physical and behavioral characteristics to its ill-fated encounter with European civilization and the ongoing fascination with the "Tassie Tiger" as a potent symbol of wildlife conservation. After humans introduced dingoes to the area 4,000 years ago, the misnamed "tiger" was driven to extinction everywhere except the island of Tasmania.

Similar books and articles. The Last Tasmanian Tiger: The History and Extinction of the Thylacine. Paradigm Shift, Then and Now: The Shakespearean Winter’s Tale and Renewal Through the Feminine. Peter Boomgaard - 2002 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 93:724-725. Judy Schavrien - 2009 - International Journal of Transpersonal Studies 28 (1):25-38. Negotiating Nostalgia: The Rhetoricity of Thylacine Representation in Tasmanian Tourism. Stephanie Turner - 2009 - Society and Animals 17 (2):97-114. The Ethics of Poisoning Foxes. Thomas Battersby - 2008 - Emergent Australasian Philosophers 1 (1).

Home Browse Books Book details, Thylacine: The Tragic Tale of the Tasmanian Tiger. Thylacine: The Tragic Tale of the Tasmanian Tiger. This is but one more controversial and sadly ironic chapter in the ever-expanding saga of the Tasmanian tiger, the mysterious marsupial predator that evolved over tens of millions of years. Over 14 million journal, magazine, and newspaper articles.

Nife work and sourcing with th e quote. I have many school commitments at the moment so I wont upload mine for a while Yours looks so good too, Love the stripes.

Deep inside Yale's Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library lies a 240 page tome. Recently carbon dated to around 1420, its pages feature looping handwriting and hand drawn images seemingly stolen from a dream. It is called the Voynich manuscript, and it’s one of history’s biggest unsolved mysteries. The reason why? No one can figure out what it says.

Is the Thylacine, or Tasmanian Tiger, still out there? Thousands of Australians, including dedicated and serious scientists, claim to have seen it. The world's largest marsupial predator was deliberately hunted to extinction through fear, ignorance and greed. But was it a savage sheep killer or a shy, fussy, nocturnal feeder? And did it really drink its victims' blood? Once reviled, feared and slaughtered by government decree, the myth of the Tasmanian Tiger continues to grow.

Johns Hopkins, March 2004. Issue: Summer 2004 Volume 80 3. Published: June 15, 2004.

Once the world's largest marsupial predator, the doglike Tasmanian tiger ( Thylacinus cynocephalus) ranged across Australia and as far north as New Guinea. After humans introduced dingoes to the area 4,000 years ago, the misnamed "tiger" was driven to extinction everywhere except the island of Tasmania. With the arrival of European settlers there in the 1800s, however, its days became numbered. Unsubstantiated tales of its blood-thirst and its unnaturally savage attacks on sheep led to the creation of "extermination societies" and ultimately to the introduction of a law in 1886 that mandated the destruction of the species. Hunted indiscriminately for fifty years, Tasmanian tigers were granted a reprieve in 1936, when the government was persuaded to protect the species. But it was too late: the last specimen died in a Hobart zoo two months later.

In Tasmanian Tiger, David Owen tells the tragic story of the thylacine, from its evolutionary origins and its physical and behavioral characteristics to its ill-fated encounter with European civilization and the ongoing fascination with the "Tassie Tiger" as a potent symbol of wildlife conservation. Elegantly written and full of interesting facts and first-hand stories from those who saw the animal in the wild, Tasmanian Tiger offers a compelling account of how fear and ignorance doomed an entire species over the course of a century. And in recounting numerous recent sightings of the thylacine in Tasmania, Owen explores the power that this once-despised creature continues to hold on the imagination today. Indeed, as described in this book, serious efforts are being undertaken to bring back the Tasmanian tiger through cloning, a controversial project that raises a number of ethical questions for scientists and conservationists everywhere. For both those familiar with the thylacine and those discovering this remarkable animal for the first time, Tasmanian Tiger is a poignant cautionary tale of human folly and the fragility of the natural world.

  • Hey, I went to Tasmania. And the Tiger represents even more than a itself. It's a spirit that we don;t want to be extinct. Let's hope the animal is still alive. But most people in Tassie fear it's discovery, mainly because if the animal is foun d, that land will be removed from timber and mining, the main way of making a living, I met many who say they believe the tiger is still alive, but hope it's never found because it will be exploited. Then again, isn't everybody sooner or later? You can see a great exhibit to the Tiger in the Tasmanian Museum in Hobart!

  • was perfect the seller even included a little holiday note!

  • My daughter loves it!

  • I hope they are still mout there. A great book.

  • Tasmanian Tiger: The Tragic Tale of How the World Lost Its Most Mysterious Predator
    by David Owen is a very good book with lots of helpful information. Well written and engaging.

  • When you visit Tasmania, you'll see plenty of tourist gifts featuring the Tassie Tiger - but behind the trinkets lies a tragic tale of extinction. And then when you drive through mountainous valleys, shrouded in mist and rain, full of trees hundreds of years old, you might even believe the Tiger is still out, hiding from its human nemesis.
    This book is well written, beautifully printed and worth the investment.

  • An engrossing account of one of the world's least understood animals. Tragically, the Tasmanian tiger came to world-wide recognition after its extinction. Owen's book serves as a detailed document of the creature's history and habits, and a woeful reminder of the amazing animal we have lost.

  • The Tasmanian tiger became extinct in 1936. While not a tiger or a feline at all, the Europeans who colonized Tasmania gave this striped marsupial predator its name because it resembled a creature they already knew. Zoologists prefer to use the term thylacine, as do I, so I will refer to it by that name. Stories of extinctions always sadden me, whether we're talking about animal or language death, and the case of the thylacine saw an entire species almost wiped out within a century. Tasmanian Tiger: The Tragic Tale of How the World Lost its Most Mysterious Predator by David Owen from 2003 tells the story of man's misperception of this gentle creature which served as the scapegoat for his ignorance.

    European settlers who emigrated to Tasmania introduced chickens and sheep to the island. These were invasive species and not the thylacine's usual prey--they preferred to hunt wallabies--yet the thylacine was blamed for attacks on chicken coops and sheep pens. There was no evidence that thylacines preyed on these introduced species, yet settlers in a strange new land populated with strange new creatures saw them as the culprits. That the thylacine looked (albeit remotely) like a predatory cat or even a wolf sealed the connection. In almost all cases it was dogs, either the domestic dingo or the pets of the settlers that preyed on chickens and sheep. The thylacine's fate was unfortunately set for doom when the government set bounties on their capture, dead or alive. Bonuses were paid for mothers who still had cubs in their pouches:

    "Thylacines were neither pest nor vermin but simply a perceived obstacle to nineteenth-century progress. And, whether snared or shot, they were also a source of bounty income."

    Although the bounties generated a vast increase in thylacine corpses and skins, the number of attacks on chickens and sheep didn't appear to diminish:

    "A second bounty scheme began in 1840--but again, the records give no real indication that either the bounties or the tiger men were necessary at all, and the suspicion must arise that invented or greatly exaggerated 'ravages' of 'savage' thylacines against the flocks conveniently masked the true nature of the Company's pastoral failings."

    In other words, would-be shepherds who had failed in their endeavours tried to cover up their shortcomings by blaming the "savage" predator known as the Tasmanian tiger. The thylacine became a convenient scapegoat for man's inability to tame the wilds of Tasmania. Thylacine scholar Robert Paddle notes that:

    "'at no stage in any of the official annual reports on the state of the [sheep] industry during these crucial years was the thylacine mentioned even as a minor problem of significance to sheep farmers'." (bracketed text in original)

    Thus the authorities knew from these reports that thylacines weren't decimating the flocks, yet still they continued to offer bounties on their bodies. Meanwhile, the real predators continued to attack.

    In the early twentieth century conservationists began to take notice, and zoos especially wanted thylacine specimens in their menageries. Zoos were offering more money for a living thylacine than the Tasmanian authorities were, so trappers caught the animals and shipped them around the world. As the last living thylacines were leaving the island, the government sat back and let it happen. They only wanted the animal eradicated:

    "The animal was neither pest nor vermin but was singled out of its environment for the apparent economic betterment of the few, by a conservative mindset demanding the continued conquest of wilderness. That Tasmanians were unable to save it from extinction--that they did not even try until well into the twentieth century--eventually spread an enormous pall of guilt, regret and sorrow."

    There was no legislated protection on the books until the animal was on its last legs--and if there was ever a more literal statement, that's it. For once the conservationists finally got their thylacine protection law passed, the animal had only limited time. Legislation could not possibly have saved it. However, enter the twenty-first century, and a new saviour awaits: cloning. Fetal thylacines which had been preserved in ethyl alcohol have been used in experiments to try to revive the species. The chance that thylacines will once again roam Tasmania seems remote and the odds are definitely stacked against it. Since reading this book but before writing its review I have conducted some of my own research on thylacine cloning and the time quoted for the first thylacine clone seems a gross overestimation in optimism:

    "Begun in 1999, the [cloning] project, with museum director Mike Archer at the helm, aims for a successful completion by 2010."

    I am not confident that thylacines will ever be cloned, even though some of their DNA had been extracted from the preserved fetuses. I am of the belief, which Owen raises, that when faced with the possibility of cloning a species which humans have rendered extinct, humans should leave the species extinct.

    Tasmanian Tiger was an exciting read, and I am happy that Owen devoted chapters to the prehistory and later European settlement of Tasmania. We learned how the thylacine got to Tasmania and how its Australian ancestors became extinct as well. Owen wrote about marsupials in general and how they found home as well in North America. The story of the thylacine could not be told without also telling the story about the colonists and their campaign to eradicate it. A chapter was devoted to thylacine sightings, and while optimistic--the scientific consensus is that the last thylacine did not die (in captivity) in 1936 and that there were probably small pockets of thylacines still roaming the wild for a good ten years after--since there have been no confirmed sightings or evidence of the creature for some eighty years, the thylacine is definitely extinct.