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ePub Birds of the Texas Panhandle (W. L. Moody Jr. Natural History Series) download

by Kenneth D. Seyffert

ePub Birds of the Texas Panhandle (W. L. Moody Jr. Natural History Series) download
Author:
Kenneth D. Seyffert
ISBN13:
978-1585440962
ISBN:
1585440965
Language:
Publisher:
Texas A&M University Press (December 1, 2000)
Category:
Subcategory:
Biological Sciences
ePub file:
1959 kb
Fb2 file:
1647 kb
Other formats:
txt mbr lit lrf
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
920

He is coauthor of Birds of Texas: A Field Guide also published by Texas A&M University Press, and has written several other volumes on bird . Series: W. L. Moody Jr. Natural History Series (Book 30).

He is coauthor of Birds of Texas: A Field Guide also published by Texas A&M University Press, and has written several other volumes on bird identification and migration. Paperback: 416 pages. Publisher: Texas A&M University Press (February 1, 2001).

By Kenneth D Seyffert; illustrations by Carolyn Stallwitz. College Station (Texas): Texas A&M University Press The history, taxonomy, distribution and cultivation requirements of the South African Lachenalia peersii Marloth ex . College Station (Texas): Texas A&M University Press. xv + 501 p; il. index. ISBN: 1–58544–091–4 (hc); 1–58544–096–5 (pb). The history, taxonomy, distribution and cultivation requirements of the South African Lachenalia peersii Marloth ex . Barker (Hyacinthaceae) are discussed; a full botanical description and illustration are provided. January 1982 · AAPG Bulletin. David K. Hobda William E. Galloway.

The vast, open plains of the Texas Panhandle appear deceptively void of bird life, but subtle regional variations . For each of the more than four hundred species found in this region, author Kenneth D. Seyffert provides information on the bird’s status, occurrence, and nesting habits.

The vast, open plains of the Texas Panhandle appear deceptively void of bird life, but subtle regional variations provide rich and varied avifauna. Of the approximately six hundred species of birds sighted in Texas, more than two-thirds have been confirmed on the Texas Panhandle. Ten elegant line drawings also accompany the text. Birds of the Texas Panhandle is a must for those already familiar with the avifauna of the Panhandle and an eyeopener for those skeptical of the abundance of bird life in the region.

L. Moody, Jr, Natural History Series, Volume 29. By Kenneth D Seyffert; illustrations by Carolyn Stallwitz.

Natural History Series) or any other file from Books category. Texas is home to all four families of bats that occur in the United States, including thirty-three species of these important yet increasingly threatened mammals. Although five species, each represented by a single specimen, may be regarded as vagrants, no other state has a bat fauna more diverse, from the state’s most common species, the Brazilian free-tailed bat, to the rare hairy-legged vampire.

The vast, open plains of the Texas Panhandle appear deceptively void of bird life, but subtle regional variations provide rich and varied avifauna

The vast, open plains of the Texas Panhandle appear deceptively void of bird life, but subtle regional variations provide rich and varied avifauna. The wooded waterways of the plains of the eastern Panhandle attract such eastern nesting species as the Red-headed Woodpecker and Carolina Chickadee.

w. Moody, J. Natural History. Birds of Kenya : A Celebration by Dave Richards (1991, Hardcover). History School Textbooks Guides. High School History Hardcover School Textbooks & Study Guides. Mathematics & Sciences Books Earth Sciences. Environment, Nature & Earth Hardcover Books.

The Texas Panhandle is a region of the . state of Texas consisting of the northernmost 26 counties in the state. Its land area is 25,823. 58 km2), or nearly 10% of the state's total.

Texas comes by this enormous diversity honestly, with rugged mountains, vast deserts, lush semi-tropical woodlands, prairies, bayous, cedar brakes, thorn forests, and one of the richest temperate migration corridors in the world located along the western Gulf Coast. The text provides detailed information on identification, habitat preferences, voice, seasonal occurrence, abundance, and distribution. Maps show precisely where in the state the bird can be found.

The vast, open plains of the Texas Panhandle appear deceptively void of bird life, but subtle regional variations provide rich and varied avifauna. Of the approximately six hundred species of birds sighted in Texas, more than two-thirds have been confirmed on the Texas Panhandle.The wooded waterways of the plains of the eastern Panhandle attract such eastern nesting species as the Red-headed Woodpecker and Carolina Chickadee. The gently rolling terrain of the High Plains and its scattered rainwater lakes, or playas, provide a winter habitat for a variety of migrating waterfowl. Canyons etched deeply into the otherwise flat terrain create sheltered places where such western birds as the Western Scrub-Jay and Bushtit thrive and breed.For each of the more than four hundred species found in this region, author Kenneth D. Seyffert provides information on the bird’s status, occurrence, and nesting habits. Ten elegant line drawings also accompany the text.Birds of the Texas Panhandle is a must for those already familiar with the avifauna of the Panhandle and an eyeopener for those skeptical of the abundance of bird life in the region. Residents fo the Panhandle will find this a handy reference to places where they can view their winged neighbors.
  • This book was a disappointment. It had no pictures to help us identify the birds we were seeing. It is more of a journal of listings of certain birds, which was of no interest to us. Very disappointed with it and would not recommend it to anyone.

  • This is a work of enormous scholarship and a complete review and collation of the sum of field observations of the vast avifauna of the region since records began. It includes Mr Seyffert's own meticulous data over many decades kept in a way that would be the envy of most naturalists. This is not a field guide and its title very clearly tells you that. It is a book for ornithologists, wildlife biologists and serious birders interested in the region. Most particularly, it is an invaluable compendium of data for future generations of naturalists and scientists to look back upon as the original sources are rare and dispersed and as such this volume would be irreproducible in the future.