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ePub How to Interpret Your DNA Test Results For Family History Ancestry: Scientists Speak Out on Genealogy Joining Genetics download

by Anne Hart

ePub How to Interpret Your DNA Test Results For Family History  Ancestry: Scientists Speak Out on Genealogy Joining Genetics download
Author:
Anne Hart
ISBN13:
978-0595263349
ISBN:
0595263348
Language:
Publisher:
iUniverse (December 19, 2002)
Category:
Subcategory:
Chemistry
ePub file:
1650 kb
Fb2 file:
1573 kb
Other formats:
rtf azw docx doc
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
616

Hart's book on "How to Interpret your DNA Tests Results. The book contains very little information on how to interpret your mitochondrial DNA results.

Hart's book on "How to Interpret your DNA Tests Results. The book does not provide the reader with any information on the topics of "short tandem repeats" (STR's) or "most recent common ancestor" (MRCA), or any significant information on mutations rates. I have not found anyplace in her book that she gives any significant information about DYS markers, or the significance thereof, on the Y chromosome.

The two have opposite views. Does Steve Olson think DNA testing as a tool is useful to genealogists? What does Bryan Sykes, author of the best-selling, The Seven Daughters of Eve have to say?

Online Stores ▾. Audible Barnes & Noble Walmart eBooks Apple Books Google Play Abebooks Book Depository Alibris Indigo Better World Books IndieBound. Paperback, 268 pages. Sandy Williams rated it really liked it Sep 02, 2013. Wendell Bowen rated it really liked it Jan 10, 2019. Nicole rated it really liked it Jan 25, 2013. Gerard Byrne marked it as to-read Mar 25, 2014.

Then find out how to interpret your DNA results with this post! . How Accurate Are The Results? Ancestry DNA tests your DNA using advanced scientific techniques and looks at over 700,000 markers in your sample. These markers look at differences between your DNA and that within Ancestry’s sample. However, if your DNA is not of high quality then you will need to supply a new sample. This map may display to you different colored pins of where your ancestors were born, the same for your DNA match and also any overlapping birth locations in both family trees.

How to DNA Test Our Family Relationships by Terrence Carmichael and Alexander Kuklin (Published .

How to DNA Test Our Family Relationships by Terrence Carmichael and Alexander Kuklin (Published December 1, 2000): DNA & Genealogy by Colleen Fitzpatrick, P. Published November 30, 2005): Genetic Genealogy DNA Testing Dictionary by Charles F. Kerchner, J. . Reflections of Our Past: How Human History is Revealed in Our Genes by John H. Relethford (Published May 6, 2003): Adam’s Curse: The Science That Reveals Our Genetic Destiny by Bryan Sykes (Published May 2005): Deep Ancestry: Inside the Genographic Project by Spencer Wells (Published November 21, 2006)

How to Interpret Your DNA Test Results for Family History & Ancestry: Scientists .

How to Interpret Your DNA Test Results for Family History & Ancestry: Scientists Speak Out on Genealogy Joining Genetics. Past Imperfect: How Tracing Your Family Medical History Can Save Your Life. A book by Carol Daus. Saxons, Vikings, and Celts: The Genetic Roots of Britain and Ireland.

Your DNA reveals more than ever before- from your origins to your family’s health. Discover DNA Matches. Historical & geographic insights.

How many DNA testing companies will show you how to interpret DNA test results for family history or direct you to instructional materials after you have had your DNA tested? Choose a company based on previous customer.

How many DNA testing companies will show you how to interpret DNA test results for family history or direct you to instructional materials after you have had your DNA tested? Choose a company based on previous customer satisfaction, and whether the company gives you choices of how many markers you .

How do you interpret your own DNA test results?

Scientists in the news speak out from opposite sides of the fence on the question of DNA testing for researching family history and ancestry. How do you interpret your own DNA test results? How do you work with or research oral history?What's the cultural component behind a trait as biological as your genes? If you're a beginning family historian, an oral history researcher, or a person with no science background fascinated with ancestry, here's how to understand and use the results of DNA tests. Scientists, media, historians, and business owners share different opinions on whether DNA testing is a useful tool in the hands of family historians.Steve Olson, author of the book, Mapping Human History in a telephone interview with me answered my question, "What do you say about using DNA as a tool for genealogy-to extend family history research?"Does Steve Olson think DNA testing as a tool is useful to genealogists? What does Bryan Sykes, author of the best-selling, The Seven Daughters of Eve have to say? Sykes's book has a very different opinion about DNA testing and genealogy/family history research. The two have opposite views. Numerous scientists comment.Sykes is associated with Oxford Ancestors, the world's first company to harness the power and precision of modern DNA-based genetics for use in genealogy. The motto on the Oxford Ancestors Web site reads: "Putting the genes in genealogy." Use these resources and easy to understand explanations for family history research.
  • I am still reading it. There are some good points but it is awfully hard to figure out how to do this as a lay person. They list many sites but none have worked out thus far. I'm about half way through it. I am a bit disappointed since most of the sites just recommend others. When you open them up it seems to be a dead end.

  • Excellent book, a must read in order to make sense of things.

  • The title of this book is NOT what is inside of it. The only thing in it that helped me was a description of what of the genetic names mean. Maybe I was expecting t much but I was not expecting it answer ALL my questions or give me very intricate detail on how to read the test results but at least tell me what I should be looking for like how to read another persons results with mine to see where and or how they match. Some sort of visual diagram on what markers are and what SNP's, etc. Matter of fact, on page 39 she gives a website and says "Here is an excellent book that I highly recommend explains and explores in layman's language how family historians-genealogist can use DNA research and test results for family history research" Well, I though that's what this book was about! She also writes ALOT about doing a paper trail genealogy, how to interview older family members, what questions to ask, etc. How to use DNA testing for medical research, and toward the back of the book, she rewrites, word for word what she already said in the beginning of the book. Very disappointed. A huge waste of money. The only small thing that was good is that she talked some about Haplotype.

  • There are many books that can be safely purchased over the internet, sight unseen. This ain't one of 'em. It was certainly not worth the $20+ that I paid for it. I think the June 2003 review from the Boston reader was right on the money. One would expect from the title of this book that it would present an extended scholarly discussion of the pros and cons of trying to use DNA testing as a tool for genealogical reseach. The author even writes in the introduction: "Here the debate unfolds as scientists, authors, physicians, media people, owners of DNA testing companies, genealogists, historians and researchers comment, write, and opine on DNA testing and genealogy."
    Instead, one finds the author quoting from her correspondence with scientists about her own DNA test results. Most of the 'debate that unfolds' involves disagreements among those scientists about the meanings of her results.
    I was particularly disappointed at how much wasted space there is in the book. Some 50 pages, for example, for a glossary of genetic terms reprinted from a US government agency paper, and 6 pages advertising the author's other (completely unrelated) books.
    All of that is not to say that no one will find this book of use. Readers who approach it with the understanding that it was written by a layperson with no special training in genetics, who wrote it as an extension of a hobby, may be less disappointed than I was. But I would advise the prospective buyer to have a look at a copy at the library or a bookstore before making a purchase.

  • I got about a quarter way through the book, and I thought someone had played a prank on me because I was reading about crafts, interviewing elderly ppl, while trying to edit out all the grammer mistakes in my head. I did finish it, but it was one tough read! Did the author not have an editor? Or did she even proof read her work? Why didn't I learn how to interpret my test results for family history & ancestry like the book says in the TITLE? It feels like the author had written a book about making a family tree, but wanted it to stand out from all the other books on that subject, so she added "DNA", and "genetics" to the title. It reads like the Author cut and pasted all that genetic stuff into the book at random! It has no context! When it does get scientific, you are given very general info that you could've found online. As a matter of fact I did find alot of the info online, almost word-for-word! I could go on about how bad this book is, but I'll let the other ppl who review this book fill in the details, because now I have to look for a REAL book about interpreting my genetic family tree!

  • Hart's book on "How to Interpret your DNA Tests Results..." is a misnomer. The book does not provide the reader with any information on the topics of "short tandem repeats" (STR's) or "most recent common ancestor" (MRCA), or any significant information on mutations rates. I have not found anyplace in her book that she gives any significant information about DYS markers, or the significance thereof, on the Y chromosome. The book contains very little information on how to interpret your mitochondrial DNA results. Further, the book contains numerous sections that do not relate to interpretation of your DNA results, such as the "Human Genome Project", "How to Interview Older Adults", "Have a Personal or Family History of Cancer", and 50 pages of a dictionary of genetic terms taken from a web site. Yet the book's index is only 5 pages in length, insufficient to find significant information that may be available. Further, the book contains some serious errors, such as "HLA genes are white blood cells".