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ePub Mother Country: Britain, the Welfare State and Nuclear Pollution download

by Marilynne Robinson

ePub Mother Country: Britain, the Welfare State and Nuclear Pollution download
Author:
Marilynne Robinson
ISBN13:
978-0374526597
ISBN:
0374526591
Language:
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux (December 1, 1999)
Category:
Subcategory:
Earth Sciences
ePub file:
1736 kb
Fb2 file:
1436 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
343

Also by marilynne robinson. Selected Bibliography. The primary producer of plutonium and pollution is a complex called Sellafield, on the Irish Sea in Cumbria, not far from William and Dorothy Wordsworth’s Dove Cottage.

Also by marilynne robinson. Nuclear Bibliography. The variety of sheep raised in that picturesque region still reflects the preference of Beatrix Potter, miniaturist of a sweetly domesticated rural landscape.

Mother Country: Britain, the Welfare State, and Nuclear Pollution (1989) is a work of nonfiction by Marilynne Robinson that tells the story of Sellafield, a government nuclear reprocessing plant located on the coast of the Irish Sea. The book shows . . The book shows how the closest village to Sellafield suffers from death and disease due to decades of waste and radiation from the plant. Mother Country was a National Book Award finalist for Nonfiction in 1989

At the time when Robinson wrote this book, the . The central question of this eloquently impassioned book is: How can a country that we persist in calling a welfare state consciously risk the lives of its people for profit.

At the time when Robinson wrote this book, the largest known source of radioactive contamination of the world's environment was a government-owned nuclear plant called Sellafield, not far from Wordsworth's cottage in the Lakes District; one child in sixty was dying from leukemia in the village closest to the plant. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

The book Mother Country is made up of two parts. The first is a history of the British welfare system. The second is about nuclear fuel reprocessing and plutonium production at Sellafield (Windscale). The main focus of the book is the failure of British government to represent the public interest, but some of her harshest criticisms are directed at the media, where disinformation, combined with a general lack of information, are too often accepted on topics of critical importance.

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At the time when Robinson wrote this book, the largest known source. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Mother Country: Britain, the Welfare State, and Nuclear Pollution as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Common terms and phrases. Marilynne Robinson is the author of the novels Gilead (FSG, 2004)-winner of the Pulitzer Prize-and Housekeeping (FSG, 1980), and two books of nonfiction, Mother Country (FSG, 1989) and The Death of Adam. She teaches at the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop. Bibliographic information. Mother Country: Britain, the Welfare State and Nuclear Pollution. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2011.

Mother Country was a National Book Award finalist for Nonfiction in 1989

Mother Country was a National Book Award finalist for Nonfiction in 1989. While on sabbatical in England, Robinson's interest in the environmental ramifications of the plant began when she discovered a newspaper article detailing its hazards. Marilynne Summers Robinson is an American novelist and essayist. Across her writing career, Robinson has received numerous awards, including the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2005, National Humanities Medal in 2012, and the 2016 Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction

Mother Country was a National Book Award Finalist for Nonfiction in 1989

Mother Country was a National Book Award Finalist for Nonfiction in 1989 References. "MOTHER COUNTRY by Marilynne Robinson Kirkus". Retrieved 2014-06-02. Shannon L. Mariotti, Joseph H. Lane Jr. A Political Companion to Marilynne Robinson 0813167787 - 2016 - This assumption pervades her first major nonfiction work -Mother Country.

The work was a finalist for the National Book Award

Other articles where Mother Country: Britain, the Welfare State, and Nuclear Pollution is discussed: Marilynne Robinson: Early nonfiction and other works. n her first nonfiction book, Mother Country: Britain, the Welfare State, and Nuclear Pollution (1989). The work was a finalist for the National Book Award.

At the time when Robinson wrote this book, the largest known source of radioactive contamination of the world's environment was a government-owned nuclear plant called Sellafield, not far from Wordsworth's cottage in the Lakes District; one child in sixty was dying from leukemia in the village closest to the plant. The central question of this eloquently impassioned book is: How can a country that we persist in calling a welfare state consciously risk the lives of its people for profit.

Mother Country is a 1989 National Book Award Finalist for Nonfiction.

  • The book Mother Country is made up of two parts. The first is a history of the British welfare system. The second is about nuclear fuel reprocessing and plutonium production at Sellafield (Windscale). Both are interesting, but the author has made too little effort to address the relationship between the two. Nevertheless, there are sentences and paragraphs to be found in this book that are exquisitely written. Through the prism of Robinson's mind, some unpleasant realities are plucked out of the white background noise that culture treats as normalcy.

    Robinson seeks the roots of a major environmental problem by exposing what she considers to be a long-standing pattern of hypocrisy, moral weakness, and lack of courage. _Mother Country_ is an indictment of English culture. As an American, I become nervous reading a condemnation of British attitudes toward the environment, written by another American. If we are lucky, someday Robinson will apply her pen to an analysis of how American culture has produced one of our own nuclear messes, such as Hanford, Washington.

    The main focus of the book is the failure of British government to represent the public interest, but some of her harshest criticisms are directed at the media, where disinformation, combined with a general lack of information, are too often accepted on topics of critical importance.

  • What happens when an aristocracy and oligarchy care not a whit for common people? Nuclear waste dumped in the North Sea and more.

  • I love her writing