mostraligabue
» » Sky in a Bottle (MIT Press)

ePub Sky in a Bottle (MIT Press) download

by Peter Pesic

ePub Sky in a Bottle (MIT Press) download
Author:
Peter Pesic
ISBN13:
978-0262662000
ISBN:
0262662000
Language:
Publisher:
The MIT Press (February 23, 2007)
Category:
Subcategory:
History & Philosophy
ePub file:
1368 kb
Fb2 file:
1213 kb
Other formats:
lrf mbr lit docx
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
895

In Sky in a Bottle, Peter Pesic takes us on a quest to the heart of this mystery, tracing the .

In Sky in a Bottle, Peter Pesic takes us on a quest to the heart of this mystery, tracing the various attempts of science, history, and art to solve it. He begins with the scholars of the ancient world and continues through the natural philosophers of the Enlightenment, the empiricists of the scientific revolution, and beyond. MIT Press Direct is a distinctive collection of influential MIT Press books curated for scholars and libraries worldwide. Peter Pesic, writer, pianist, and scholar, is Director of the Science Institute and e at St. John's College, Santa Fe.

I have read Peter Pesic's book on Abel in which he does a very good job of explaining the issues. Coming from a physicist (and serious musician apparently) "Sky in a bottle" is not what I expected. He certainly develops ideas rigorously but he also gives non-technical readers a bit of a "travelogue" about the history of man's attempts to answer the non-trivial question of why the sky is blue.

Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Sky in a Bottle. Pesic also records the efforts of artists and writers to capture the blue color of the sky in their paintings and writings. Nimbly stepping from Goethe to Einstein, Peter Pesic takes us to awesome mountain peaks and into darkened laboratories to see where the blue in the sky comes from.

Pesic's odyssey introduces us to central ideas of chemistry, optics, and atomic physics. And Pesic asks another, daring, question: Can we put the sky in a bottle? Can we recreate and understand its blueness here on earth?

Children ask, "Why is the sky blue?" but the question also puzzled Plato, Leonardo, and even Newton, who unlocked so many other secrets. Pesic's odyssey introduces us to central ideas of chemistry, optics, and atomic physics. He describes the polarization of light, Rayleigh scattering, and connections between the appearance of the sky and Avogadro's number. And Pesic asks another, daring, question: Can we put the sky in a bottle? Can we recreate and understand its blueness here on earth?

Sky in a Bottle - The MIT Press (Paperback). Peter Pesic (author). Blue is a theme throughout the book-and not just sky blue. Each of the ten chapters has blue in its title, from the opening 'Out of the Blue' to the concluding 'The Perfect Blue

Sky in a Bottle - The MIT Press (Paperback). Each of the ten chapters has blue in its title, from the opening 'Out of the Blue' to the concluding 'The Perfect Blue. A delightful and informative read. Science If only Tyndall could have put his hands on an advance copy of science historian Peter Pesic's luminous new book, Sky in a Bottle.

Sky in a Bottle book. Paperback, 262 pages. Published April 1st 2007 by Mit Press (first published December 1st 2005). In Sky in a Bottle, Peter Pesic takes us on a quest to the heart of this mystery, tracing the various attempts of science, history, and art to solve it. 0262662000 (ISBN13: 9780262662000).

Magazine article Natural History. But fortunately for the reader, the scholarly Pesic has eschewed obfuscation and produced a succinct and approachable intellectual history that sheds light on the entire scientific enterprise

Magazine article Natural History. Magazine article Natural History. But fortunately for the reader, the scholarly Pesic has eschewed obfuscation and produced a succinct and approachable intellectual history that sheds light on the entire scientific enterprise. Sky in a Bottle begins, not surprisingly, with the Greeks, who debated all the fundamental elements of the blue-sky problem: the structure of the heavens, the phenomenon of color, and the nature ot vision itself. Does the eye send out a stream of fire that "feels" the objects it senses? Or do luminous objects give off rays of some kind, which convey color to the viewer?

The Story of a Question: Sky in a Bottle: Peter Pesic. Article in The Physics Teacher 44(5) · May 2006 with 14 Reads. How we measure 'reads'.

The Story of a Question: Sky in a Bottle: Peter Pesic.

The Books are in Russian: Artem Popov. Emmons, Conant H. BOTTLED SHIPS. HOW TO MAKE A SHIP IN A BOTTLE. the Studio Publications, London, New York. The book is full published on this site. The Books are in English: Anderson, Lars. Secrets of ships in bottles. Scandia Press, Bergen, Norway, 1996. Percival Marshal Publications, London, 1951 -93 pages. Ship in Bottle Press, Lusby, Maryland, USA. 1969, 93 pages. BROCKLEY BOTTLE MODELS, 5 pages.

The age-old question "Why is the sky blue?" begins a quest through science, history, and art, from Aristotle and Newton through Goethe and Einstein.

Children ask, "Why is the sky blue?" but the question also puzzled Plato, Leonardo, and even Newton, who unlocked so many other secrets. The search for an answer continued for centuries; in 1862 Sir John Herschel listed the color and polarization of sky light as "the two great standing enigmas of meteorology." In Sky in a Bottle, Peter Pesic takes us on a quest to the heart of this mystery, tracing the various attempts of science, history, and art to solve it. He begins with the scholars of the ancient world and continues through the natural philosophers of the Enlightenment, the empiricists of the scientific revolution, and beyond. The cast of characters includes Aristotle, Leonardo da Vinci, Kepler, Descartes, Euler, Saussure, Goethe, Rayleigh, and Einstein; but the protagonist is the question itself, and the story tells how we have tried to answer it.

Pesic's odyssey introduces us to central ideas of chemistry, optics, and atomic physics. He describes the polarization of light, Rayleigh scattering, and connections between the appearance of the sky and Avogadro's number. He discusses changing representations of the sky in art, from new styles of painting to new pigments that created new colors for paint. He considers what the sky's nighttime brightness might tell us about the size and density of the universe. And Pesic asks another, daring, question: Can we put the sky in a bottle? Can we recreate and understand its blueness here on earth? This puzzle, he says, opens larger perspectives; questions of the color and brightness of the sky touch on secrets of matter and light, the scope of the universe in space and time, the destiny of the earth, and deep human feelings.

  • One could read this book as a day in the life of the sky with a large thermals of interesting scientific hisotry shooting upwards for effect. It is well written and for anyone interested in scientifc methodology the vignettes of past geniuses make arresting reading. Nearly all teh late Enlightemnt greats and early modern scientists make substantial appearances. The idiosyncratic lengths the went to to test hypotheses, designe experiments and damge the opposition are both instructional and striking ina world used to computer simulations and technology. If anything is is teh bare briliant simplicity of their thinkign, beutifuclly reconstructed, that lends this book an inspirational tone. Definitely one to pass onot to your older children if their interest in science is flagging or, hopefully, burgeoning.

  • Mr. Pesic has written a wonderful book about the history of a common phenomenon - the quest to understand why the sky is blue. At first, this seems like a question that doesn't need answering. Everone knows the sky is supposed to be blue!
    But as Mr. Pesic notes, the answer depends upon an understanding of modern physics. I liked his description of how scientists began to realize that they didn't understand why the sky was blue. After all, as Mr. Pesic notes, a question cannot be answered until it has been asked. If we all followed a similar path, our lives would be more tranquil: What do we really know? What do we presume to know? What don't we know?

  • One could almost use this book for the central organization of history of science course, and I think the students would understand the true nature of science better than in other presentations. (The book even includes some experiments.) It shows science in the making, from the earliest philosophers to experimentalists and theoreticians, emphasizing the somewhat rocky and cicuitous road to "truth". Clearly, the obvious is not always so, even to the best of minds. Anyway, to understand the color of the sky requires a lot of physical and chemical knowledge that the author slowly develops in a non-mathematical way. He also becomes a Renaissance man, talking about more than just the science involved.

  • Simply put, this book is about human efforts in trying to understand why the daytime clear sky is blue. In the earliest parts of the book, ancient thought on this issue is discussed; hence, the arguments are more philosophical in nature, as one would expect. As the book progresses, more and more recent, and hence more technical, arguments are presented. Finally, the latter part of the main text involves the latest, fairly detailed scientific explanations for the blueness of the sky. The prose is kept simple and technical arguments are very clearly explained. Over 40 pages of notes are included at the end of the book where the reader can find references and more detailed explanations for the some of the material given in the main text. Finally, the book contains descriptions of simple experiments that one can try at home - experiments that are meant to illustrate some of phenomena described in the book. Adequately illustrated with useful diagrams, this book would be of interest mainly, I believe, to science buffs.

  • This isn't exactly light reading, but it is very readable. Peter Pesic demonstrates an artful ability to describe the history or scientific thought by focusing on one particular issue. In so doing, he educates the reader on how some very great writers, philosophers and early scientists approached the world. Never pedantic, Pesic displays an amazingly wide source of knowledge cutting across many fields. I am enjoying it thus far.

  • I have read Peter Pesic's book on Abel in which he does a very good job of explaining the issues. Coming from a physicist (and serious musician apparently) "Sky in a bottle" is not what I expected. He certainly develops ideas rigorously but he also gives non-technical readers a bit of a "travelogue" about the history of man's attempts to answer the non-trivial question of why the sky is blue. Thus there are fascinating comments such as that 'as late as the 18th century carriages passing through the Alps would close their blinds to spare their passengers what was considered alarming and monstrous scenery."

    There is an appendix on the various experiments and you can have a go at some of them yourself to get a feel for why a solution to the problem was so elusive.

    The book also contains useful material on the resolution of Olber's Paradox (why isn't the night sky bright).

    So what is the answer to the problem? Get the book and after a quick read you will have the answer and have experienced a pleasant intellectual journey