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ePub Real and Complex Analysis, International Student Edition (McGraw-Hill Series in Higher Mathematics) download

by Walter Rudin

ePub Real and Complex Analysis, International Student Edition (McGraw-Hill Series in Higher Mathematics) download
Author:
Walter Rudin
ISBN13:
978-0070941892
ISBN:
0070941890
Language:
Publisher:
McGraw-Hill Education; New Ed edition (1970)
Category:
Subcategory:
Mathematics
ePub file:
1448 kb
Fb2 file:
1682 kb
Other formats:
lrf lrf lit txt
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
448

This is an excellent book that combines real and complex analysis into one course

Only 7 left in stock (more on the way). This is an excellent book that combines real and complex analysis into one course. Furthermore, it is good to see the two topics combined into one course showing applicability of Real Analysis in areas of Complex Analysis, such as Fourier Transforms.

Most of what Rudin leaves out of the text shows up in the exercises - whether or not that is a plus to This book works great as a reference (after having learned Real & Complex Analysis), but is a pain in the ass to learn it from. If you are looking for a good first text on Measure theory, I would recommend Eli Stein's book on Measure Theory or Folland's Real Analysis Everything contained in the book is useful, though - there are no throwaway theorems or rehashed proofs of earlier material.

Real and Complex Analysis, Papa Rudin, 1987. A classic but very challenging textbook. Integration is described with a high degree of abstraction, for example, the Lebesgue integral is developed as a corollary of the Riesz representation theorem

Real and Complex Analysis, Papa Rudin, 1987. Integration is described with a high degree of abstraction, for example, the Lebesgue integral is developed as a corollary of the Riesz representation theorem. After measure theory and Hilbert and Banach space methods, it transitions seamlessly to an excellent and complete development of complex variable theory. Reading this book is hard work, but worth it! 2,188 Views.

This text is part of the Walter Rudin Student Series in Advanced Mathematics. McGraw-Hill eBook Courses Include: Offline reading – study anytime, anywhere. One interface for all McGraw-Hill eBooks. Highlighting and note-taking.

g 400-high/0070542341. jpeg 3 May 1, 070542341 This is an advanced text for the one- or two-semester course in analysis taught primarily to math, science, computer science, and electrical engineering majors at the junior, senior or graduate level. This text is part of the Walter Rudin Student Series in Advanced Mathematics. Real and Complex Analysis.

Paperback published 1987-03-01 by McGraw Hill Higher Education. The traditionally separate subjects of 'real analysis' and 'complex analysis' are thus united in one volume. Some of the basic ideas from functional analysis are also included. This is the only book to take this unique approach.

about everything from international diplomatic relations to overseas conflicts This text is part of the Walter Rudin Student Series. 100 Ways to Motivate Others.

about everything from international diplomatic relations to overseas conflicts. Frontiers in Massive Data Analysis. 59 MB·42,815 Downloads·New! sources of discovery and knowledge, requiring sophisticated analysis techniques that go far beyond. Complex environmental problems are often reduced to an inappropriate level of simplicity. This text is part of the Walter Rudin Student Series. 191 Pages·2005·544 KB·194,440 Downloads.

Publication Year 1986. Publisher McGraw-Hill Education.

Real and Complex Analysis (Higher Mathematics Series) by Walter Rudin is ready for immediate shipment to any location. This is a brand new book at a great price. Publication Year 1986. Condition Brand New. Pages 483.

Real and Complex Analysis (Higher Mathematics Series). Functional Analysis (McGraw-Hill Series in Higher Mathematics).

Real and Complex Analysis (Higher Mathematics Series) ) . 42252/?tag prabook0b-20. Function Theory in the Unit Ball of Cn (Classics in Mathematics) ) General.

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International series in pure and applied mathematics) Includes index. It is fundamental that real and complex numbers obey the same basic laws of arithmetic. We begin our study of complex func- tion theory by stressing and implementing this analogy. Arithmetic Operations. From elementary algebra the reader is acquainted with the imaginary unit i with the property i 2 -1. If the imaginary unit is combined with two real num- bers a, (:3 by the processes of addition and multiplication, we obtain a complex number a+ i(:3. a and (:3 are the real and imaginary part of the.

Real and Complex Analysis, International Edition has the same content as the American edition.
  • This is the second book in the Rudin series suitable for the first year graduate student who has completed Rudin's first book, "Mathematical Analysis" (Chapters 1-7 and 11) or any introductory 1-year course in Real Analysis at the undergraduate senior level. However, in order to fully understand the topics in Complex Analysis presented in this book, one should complete an undergraduate course in Complex Variables in addition to undergraduate Real Analysis. This book also provides excellent preparation for mathematicians planning to study Rudin's 3rd book "Functional Analysis".

    This is an excellent book that combines real and complex analysis into one course. A good thing about using this book is that one can complete a course in both subjects in one year affording them room in their graduate corriculum to study an additional mathematical area. Furthermore, it is good to see the two topics combined into one course showing applicability of Real Analysis in areas of Complex Analysis, such as Fourier Transforms. Also, topics in Functional Analysis are provided later in the book.

  • This year we have been using the 1987 third edition of Walter Rudin's treatise as the main text for a standard first-year graduate sequence on real analysis, backed up by Wheeden/Zygmund's book on Measure and Integral, and the two seem to complement each other quite nicely. Rudin writes in a very user-friendly yet concise manner, and at the same time he masterfully manages to maintain the high level of formality required from a graduate mathematics text. To be totally honest, a few years ago my very first attempt at learning graduate-level real analysis in a classroom setting (via Folland's book) was not successful, as I found the exposition in Folland very dense and rigid, and the homework problems too difficult to do. Rudin's book however, is a lot more accessible for the beginning graduate students who may not have had any more than some basic exposure to measure theory in their upper division analysis classes. (I will inevitably be making a few comparisons between the two texts in the following.) One point to keep in mind though, is that Rudin developes the measure in a more formal axiomatic direction, instead of in the more concrete, constructive approach. In the constructive approach, one first introduces the "subadditive" outer measure as a set function which is defined on the power set P(X) of a nonempty set X. One then proceeds by showing that the restriction of the domain of the outer measure to a smaller class of subsets of X (a sigma algebra M), obtained via applying the Caratheodory's criterion, results in a "countably additive" set function which is called a measure on (X, M) (The latter is the approach also taken in both H.L. Royden and Wheeden/Zygmund). The formal approach is not very intuitive and is less natural for a beginning graduate student who might not have developed some level of mathematical maturity yet.

    Also, Rudin does not discuss some of the more advanced or interdisciplinary topics such as distribution theory (Sobolev spaces, weak derivatives, etc.) or applications of measure theory to the probability theory, both explored in the book by Folland. Last but not least, it's worth noting that contrary to the common practice, Folland includes many end-of-chapter notes where he outlines some important historical aspects of the development of the topics, and also gives a few references for further study. For example, in the notes section at the end of the chapter on Lebesgue integration, he mentions --and briefly outlines-- the basics of the theory of "gauge integration" (aka Henstock-Kurzweil theory) which serves to construct a more powerful integral than that of the Lebesgue's. As another instance, having already defined and used "nets" within the chapter on topology, in the end-notes Folland also introduces "filters" and "ultrafilters". These are all machineries which have been developed to play the role of the metric space sequences in general (locally Hausdorff) topological spaces, but for some historical reasons, ultrafilters have nowadays taken a backseat to the nets (the older general topology books usually prove the Tychonoff theorem using ultrafilters). All said, I can recommend taking up Royden as your very first approach to measure theory, then based on how well you think you have learned the first course, move on to either Rudin or Folland for a more advanced treatment. Please note that the other books I have mentioned above do not discuss complex analysis, a subject which is also masterfully presented in Rudin. There are however a few other equally well-written complex analysis books to pick from, for example John B. Conway's classic from the Springer-Verlag graduate text series, or L.V. Ahlfors's wonderful monograph, to name just a couple.

  • This is a very nice book. However in my opinion it is not the best of Rudin's three well-known books on analysis (Principles, Real and Complex, and Functional). The third, Functional Analysis, is a better representation of the subject, covering distribution theory alongside Fourier analysis, and containing applications of analysis to other areas of mathematics, such as number theory and PDE.

    The first chapter and the chapter on Hilbert spaces are favorites of mine. It makes a good reference, but one should be sure to study other authors as well. The organization of the book is innovative and for that it is stimulating.

    It's good, but frustrating at times, when one is drawn in by an elegantly stated theorem only to be inexplicably let down by a proof which does the job, but leaves out the motivating ideas. Rudin has a talent for making difficult things clear, but one should exercise caution, because he also has a talent for making simple things appear difficult.

  • This is not about contents of this great book: this particular version of the book (yellow cover paperback) is "indian edition" if you look at the photo carefully. The price is good but the paper quality is low.

  • Walter Rudin is a great expositor. He can one line a proof that would take you three pages, and he could 'one page' a proof that would take your professor three weeks to motivate. Although, you must fill in the steps which he chooses to omit. Don't turn to this book for comfort, if you want someone to baby then choose a different author. If you want pictures, then draw them! Do not use this as a first exposure to analysis or you will certainly hate the subject and take little if anything from it. For that I would consider Tom Apostol's Mathematical Analysis or something of that caliber. If you get stuck, read it again, and again, and again. This stuff is not easy but is one of the most fundamental branches of mathematics with applications out the a**, i.e. statistics, quantum theory, ... My only complaint would be the price, charging this much for a book that has been around this long is absurd (F you Mcgraw-Hill!). Lastly, this book ages like wine so give it a little to warm up to you.

  • Continuing on in the Rudin versus Royden debate, to be fair when Rudin gets compared to "Royden" the comparison really should be to this book and not "The Principles of Mathematical Analysis". If you want to include complex analysis, for example if you are interested in the characteristic function of the terminal node of a stochastic process, then you should consider this book over "Royden". However, Royden and Fitzpatrick is also very nicely written and is ultimately easier for the reader to understand.