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ePub Seven Wonders: Everyday Things for a Healthier Planet download

by John C. Ryan

ePub Seven Wonders: Everyday Things for a Healthier Planet download
Author:
John C. Ryan
ISBN13:
978-1578050383
ISBN:
1578050383
Language:
Publisher:
Sierra Club Books; F First Paperback Edition Used edition (October 3, 1999)
Category:
Subcategory:
Nature & Ecology
ePub file:
1300 kb
Fb2 file:
1915 kb
Other formats:
rtf mobi txt docx
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
350

In Seven Wonders, John C. Ryan recommends a few simple things that could have a substantial positive impact on the planet's natural resources.

In Seven Wonders, John C. The benefits of some of his "wonders" are obvious: condoms are a valuable tool in both birth control and the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases, while using a clothesline instead of a dryer saves energy and money.

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Seven Wonders: Everyday Things for a Healthier Planet as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Ryan, John C. Publication date. Ecological engineering. San Francisco : Sierra Club Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

ISBN: 9781578050383; Seven Wonders – Everyday Things for a Healthier Planet. ru 748. Похожие книги: Seven Wonders of the Universe That You Probably Took for Granted. Seven Wonders of the Universe That You Probably Took fo от 5043. Seven Wonders of the Universe That You Probably Took for Granted. Seven Wonders of the Universe That You Probably Took fo от 2323. Seven Wonders of Portugal. Ryan recommends a few simple things that could have a substantial positive impact on the planet's . It also includes 20 pages of sources and places to contact

In Seven Wonders, John C. It also includes 20 pages of sources and places to contact. It is a must read for any enviromentalist, scientist, or educator. The wonder of "Seven Wonders". com User, December 2, 1999. For an environmentalist of long (or even short) standing, one keeps nodding and nodding all the way through this unfortunately short work.

Everyday Things for a Healthier Planet. Published October 3, 1999 by Sierra Club Books. Ecological engineering, Protected DAISY, In library.

Natural History Books. Seven Wonders : Everyday Things for a Healthier Planet. By (author) John C. Ryan.

An engaging call for conservation and environmental protection describes the ecological benefits of such everyday items as the bicycle, ceiling fan, clothesline, condom, Thai food, public library, and ladybug, examining their influence on air pollution, pesticide poisoning, waste control, and more. Original. 25,000 first printing.
  • It's a great find. If everyone did just ONE thing from this book to help make the planet healthier, we'd definitely be living in a better place.

  • In "Seven Wonders", Ryan uses seven common products (Bicycle, Condom, Ceiling Fan, Clothesline, Pad Thai, Public Library, and Ladybug) to illustrate how anyone can lead an environmentally responsible lifestyle. Each object is a physical component related to issues which effect all of global ecology. Each object is tied to the thesis of his argument: The current North American lifestyle is not sustainable, and greater simplicity and efficiency is need to acheive sustainability.

    Ryan takes complex and diverse information and concepts and effectively condenses and unifies them with each object. Ryan's central concept is efficiency. He illuminates an interesting and unfortunate irony of the U.S. economy: The U.S. business model has created perhaps the most efficient and productive economy in human history; maximizing efficiency in production of goods and services maximizes profit. While this model is adhered to almost absolutely in business, it's largely ignored in everyday lives. Each of the seven objects serves it's purpose more efficiently than what is normally used: The bicycle is the most efficient form of transportation that exists, yet the car is by far the most frequent method of transit. He acknowledges the limitations of bicycles (can't cover long distances quickly, limited cargo capacity), but since about half of all car trips are less than three miles, a bicycle is more efficient in most situations; a ceiling fan is a more efficient temperature reducer than AC; Pad Thai illustrates the efficiency of plant-based, over animal-based diets; borrowing books, media material, etc. from a public library saves energy and resources over purchasing them.

    Not everything in "Seven Wonders" is revelatory. When he discusses the condom, Ryan presents little that anyone with a cursory understanding of contraception and human ecology doesn't already know, but overall he illuminates how the orthodox North American lifestyle is directly related to issues which effect the entire society and planet. Environmentalists are often dubbed as pessimists (perhaps fairly), but Ryan offers hope in the form of simple, relatively easy lifestyle changes which will effect considerable, positive change if North Americans are consciously willing to evolve.

  • For an environmentalist of long (or even short) standing, one keeps nodding and nodding all the way through this unfortunately short work. Much of what was presented isn't new (to environmentalists) -- although I *did* find the number of sexual acts daily on planet Earth fascinating, as well as the material on Thai Pad -- but the great thing about the book is the way it's written. Material is presented clearly, forcefully, and occasionally with humor. When all's said and done, the seven suggestions here would make the world a far better place than ever it has been before. Give this book as a present to those unaware, those aware, and even your aunt. "Seven Wonders" is worth far more than the price of admission.

  • As a frequent visitor to Thailand and lover of Thai cuisine, I can attest to "Pad Thai" being one of the sustainable wonders of the world. Thai food is nutritious, low in fat, and you just plain "feel better" after eating it. In this chapter, author John Ryan provides readers with a wealth of research documenting the relationship between Asia diets and health; and American meat diets and disease. A couple important points he makes: "Agriculture is the leading source of water pollution and the biggest water user in North America" (p.47). Eating less meat, more fish, rice and veggies can keep you healthier and help preserve our environment. And to those who think all thai food is "hot and spicy" - wrong! Take Ryan's advice and try a thai restaurant near you (there are many in America). You'll be glad you did.

    Even if you only read this one chapter of Ryan's book (complete with a Pad Thai simple recipe), you'll find it worthwhile. Choice's matter!