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ePub Condors in Canyon Country: The Return of the California Condor to the Grand Canyon Region download

by Sophie A. H. Osborn

ePub Condors in Canyon Country: The Return of the California Condor to the Grand Canyon Region download
Author:
Sophie A. H. Osborn
ISBN13:
978-0938216872
ISBN:
0938216872
Language:
Publisher:
Grand Canyon Association; 1 edition (April 30, 2007)
Category:
Subcategory:
Nature & Ecology
ePub file:
1867 kb
Fb2 file:
1935 kb
Other formats:
lit docx lrf rtf
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
246

I personally viewed Condors at the Grand Canyon a few years ago and Osborn's descriptions of the visual impact of again . The photo on page 77 of a Condor in the Grand Canyon is worth the price of the book alone.

I personally viewed Condors at the Grand Canyon a few years ago and Osborn's descriptions of the visual impact of again seeing these birds are right on target. It is truly a sight to remember. In addition to a splendid narrative there are photographs that surely will be made into a picture book. The book has been called the only book of its kind and that is surely true.

Condors in Canyon Country book. Ten thousand years ago, the California condor’s shadow raced across the rock faces of canyon walls throughout the Southwest, but, over time, the majestic condor disappeared from this land-seemingly forever. Last seen in northern Arizona in 1924, the California condor was on the brink of extinction.

Sophie A. H. Osborn’s groundbreaking book, Condors inCanyon Country, tells the tragic but ultimately triumphantstory of the condors of the Grand Canyon region

Sophie A. Osborn’s groundbreaking book, Condors inCanyon Country, tells the tragic but ultimately triumphantstory of the condors of the Grand Canyon region. A naturalstoryteller, Osborn has written an in-depth, highly personalnarrative that brings you along as the author and othercondor biologists struggle to ensure the survival of thespecies. The book’s kaleidoscopic photographs of thesehuge birds flying free over the Southwest are nearly asbreathtaking as seeing California condors live. Osborn's groundbreaking, award-winning book Condors in Canyon Country tells the tragic but hopeful story of the condors of the Grand Canyon region. A talented, passionate storyteller, Osborns indepth, intimate narrative guides the reader along as she and other biologists continue the struggle to ensure the survival of the species. Even now, the condor faces serious threats to its survival, including lead poisoning associated with ammunition.

Condors in Canyon Country: The Return of the California Condor to the Grand Canyon Region.

Condors in Canyon Country: The Return of the California Condor to the Grand Canyon Region April 2009 · Western North American Naturalist. As the author notes, many great stories have barely been noticed or have remained entirely unknown (6), and this book brings to light many of these fascinating stories.

The California condor population at the Grand Canyon and elsewhere continues to rebound. When I visited the Grand Canyon a decade ago, I was treated to a rare sight: A California Condor sitting on a rock just 15 feet in front of us. It was huge – this thing could tear your face off. The Condors are a critically endangered species that now exists only in parts of California and Arizona and small patches of Utah and northern Mexico

2007: Sophie A. Osborn, Condors in Canyon Country: The Return of the California Condor to the Grand Canyon Region. 2007: Francis Latreille, White Paradise: Journeys to the North Pole. 2008: Steven Kazlowski, The Last Polar Bear: Facing the Truth of a Warming World.

2007: Sophie A. 2008: Wayne Grady, The Great Lakes: The Natural History of a Changing Region. 2009: Yann Arthus-Bertrand, Our Living Earth. 2009: Michael Welland, Sand: The Never Ending Story. 2006: David Attenborough, Life in the Underground. 2006: David Zurick, Julsun Pacheco, Illustrated Atlas of the Himalaya. 2006: Wayne Ranney, Carving Grand Canyon: Evidence, Theories, and Mystery. 2005: James R. Spotila, Sea Turtles: A Complete Guide to their Biology, Behavior and Conservation. 2004: Kenneth G. Libbrecht, Patricia Rasmussen (photo), The Snowflake: Winter's Secret Beauty. Work of Significance Award. Connecticut Walk Book: The Guide to the Blue-Blazed Hiking Trails of Western Connecticut. By Sophie A. Osborn. Grand Canyon Association, Grand Canyon, AZ. ISBN 9780938216988. Nature and Environment Category. White Paradise: Journeys to the North Pole. By Francis Latreille. Connecticut Forest and Park Association, Rockfall, CN 06481.

Ten thousand years ago, the California condor's shadow raced across the rock faces of canyon walls throughout the Southwest, but, over time, the majestic condor disappeared from this land-seemingly forever. Last seen in northern Arizona in 1924, the California condor was on the brink of extinction. In the early 1980s, scientists documented only twenty-two condors remaining in the wild, all in California. Thanks to a successful captive-breeding program, their numbers have increased dramatically, and dozens now fly free over northern Arizona and southern Utah. Sophie A. H. Osborn's groundbreaking book, Condors in Canyon Country, tells the tragic but ultimately triumphant story of the condors of the Grand Canyon region. A natural storyteller, Osborn has written an in-depth, highly personal narrative that brings you along as the author and other condor biologists struggle to ensure the survival of the species. The book's kaleidoscopic photographs of these huge birds flying free over the Southwest are nearly as breathtaking as seeing California condors live. The only book of its kind, Condors in Canyon Country is a must-read for anyone passionate about endangered species and what humankind can do to save them.
  • First found this book in a gift shop @ Grand Canyon visitors center. Went back a yr. later to purchase another as a gift, but
    where no longer there. This is a fabulous book, personally researched & photographed by hands on author. These birds are
    stunning & their story is fascinating. Be sure to take the forest ranger class offered @ top of south rim of Grand Canyon, & you too will
    be amazed by these endangered condors. We saw several on our hike down to bottom of the Canyon in 2015, on the South Kaibab trail.
    Doing it again Mar. 2017. This is the best source about these birds I have read, & I've looked for more books since finding this one.

  • I bought this book for my 6 year old daughter who has had a deep fascination and love for California Condors since watching a documentary about the Grand Canyon 2 years ago which described their plight. I wanted something that would develop her knowledge of these amazing birds, something non-fiction and beyond the basic story of the Condor, something that would grow with her.

    We LOVE this book! Although the language used is not child oriented (obviously, this isn't your average childs book), we read it together (and discuss the parts she doesn't understand) and she sits and listens, asks questions and we both thoroughly enjoy the story-telling way this book is written.

    We highly recommend this book to anyone who has an interest in these amazing birds.

  • I purchased my copy while at the Grand Canyon National Park last summer and then just had to buy it as a gift for the veterinarian who heads a Wildlife Rehabilitation Center where I volunteer. It is just awesome, hard to put down and the pictures are wonderful. If you love animals and are interested in the reintroduction of condors back into the Grand Canyon, this is a must!!

  • Every so often a book comes along that makes you feel good and offers a glimmer of hope for the environment. This is such a book.
    The California Condor is a magnificent bird, the largest flying land bird in North America with wingspans reaching 9.5 feet. There was a time, 10,000 years ago, when the Condor soared in abundance above the canyonlands of the American southwest, including the Grand Canyon. However, over time they began to disappear until in the early 1980s there were only 22 remaining in the wild. By 1987 the last wild Condor disappeared. Even today there are only 141 living in the wild, primarily in northern Arizona, southern Utah and California.
    This book is about the near extinction of the bird and the heroic efforts of biologists and other dedicated individuals to ensure the survival of the species. The successful implementation of a controversial captive-breeding program that has resulted in the reappearance of the birds in the Grand Canyon and Vermillion Cliffs along the Arizona Strip in Northern Arizona after a 70-year absence has given hope that the species will return to its rightful place in the ecosystem. It is a story that is inspiring, bittersweet,and will leave you cheering for these magnificent creatures.
    I personally viewed Condors at the Grand Canyon a few years ago and Osborn's descriptions of the visual impact of again seeing these birds are right on target. It is truly a sight to remember.
    In addition to a splendid narrative there are photographs that surely will be made into a picture book. The photo on page 77 of a Condor in the Grand Canyon is worth the price of the book alone.
    The book has been called the only book of its kind and that is surely true. I know of no other on the subject that makes such compelling reading and provides evidence that humankind can save endangered species, given dedication and cooperation among the myriad interests involved. A wonderful book.

  • For anyone interested in wildlife, birds, and stories of survival....this is the perfect book. It's an amazing blend of facts about the natural history of the California Condor and the personal accounts of a biologist who dedicated several years of her life ensuring that the condors were successfully reintroduced to their historical range in the Grand Canyon. The photos are spectacular and the writing is absolutely beautiful. The book gives you a very personal look at the myriad challenges and rewards associated with the restoration of an endangered species. I highly recommend it.