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ePub Quantum Physics: Of Atoms, Molecules, Solids, Nuclei And Particles download

by Robert Eisberg

ePub Quantum Physics: Of Atoms, Molecules, Solids, Nuclei And Particles download
Author:
Robert Eisberg
ISBN13:
978-8126508181
ISBN:
8126508183
Language:
Publisher:
W; 2nd edition (1985)
Category:
Subcategory:
Physics
ePub file:
1368 kb
Fb2 file:
1608 kb
Other formats:
lrf doc lit mobi
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
154

by Robert Eisberg (Author), Robert Resnick (Author). Owning 3 Intro Quantum text books (I like to use various resources when studying), this book is by far the worst (not only Quantum, but physics in general) book I have ever read.

by Robert Eisberg (Author), Robert Resnick (Author). ISBN-13: 978-0471873730. The problems with this book is the author assumes the reader has either a prior knowledge of the subject matter or that the reader has a overly superior set of math skills, I dont know, I have pretty strong math skills and most of the time I have no clue how or why he does things. The text is written very math and equation oriented.

He is consequently the senior author of this book.

Quantum physics of atoms, molecules, solids, nuclei, and particles. He is consequently the senior author of this book.

Quantum theory grew out of investigations into atoms and the basic approach of this book parallels that historical development, tracing quantum theory through the study of atoms, molecules, solids, and nuclei. Many other books simply toss chuck wave functions at you and hope that you Quantum physics is notoriously for crushing the enthusiasm of many a young physics student with a massive iron club of mathematics but this is a surprisingly gentle introduction that doesn't sacrifice the theory.

Eisberg, Robert Martin; Resnick, Robert, 1923-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on July 13, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Quantum Probability and Infinite Dimensional Analysis : proceedings of the 26th Conference : Levico, Italy, 20-26 February 2005. L Accardi, Wolfgang Freudenberg, Michael Schürmann.

physics Nuclei, and Particles.

Learning never exhausts the mind. Other important examples include turbulent transport and diffusion of particle-tracers. Atoms, Molecules and Photons: An Introduction to Atomic-, Molecular- and Quantum Physics. 75 MB·3,699 Downloads·New! the theoretical side, by the introduction of quantum physics to the adequate description of micro-part. Nuclei, and Particles. Quantum Physics of Atoms, Molecules, Solids, Nuclei, and Particles, 2nd ed. 866 Pages·2010·14 MB·31 Downloads.

A revision of a successful junior/senior level text, this introduction to elementary quantum mechanics clearly explains the properties of the most important quantum systems. Includes new appendices on such topics as crystallography, Fourier Integral Description of a Wave Group, and Time-Independent Perturbation Theory.

Robert M. Eisberg, Robert Resnick. A revision of a successful junior/senior level text, this introduction to elementary quantum mechanics clearly explains the properties of the most important quantum systems.

***** International Edition *****
  • I am in a Nuclear Engineering PhD program and avoid Quantum Mechanics as much as possible. Sometimes this is unavoidable and this text is a great introductory text. Written with lots of narrative, the authors do a great job at describing what is happening as opposed to just throwing up a bunch of equations on the page and moving on. They also actually show a lot of the intermediate steps in the derivations that a lot of other texts would "leave it to the reader"...I bought the International edition and for my purposes it was great. The paper is practically see-through but I used it more as a reference as opposed to a daily textbook. It may not stand-up to rigorous use but for the price, it met my needs.

  • Best introduction to subatomic physics and quantum phenomena there is. Very readable. A bit dated ("What? No Higgs boson?"), but not at all outdated.

  • I think this book is surely meant to go along with a class, I don't think it is entirely suited for independent study. The reason I feel this is that the discussion questions at the end of each chapter seem to be asking about stuff that isn't really addressed in the chapter, and requires additional knowledge unrelated to what is given in the book to answer. Also, there are no solutions to the practice problems, so you will never be able to test your own accuracy. I really believe in having solutions in the back of the book, otherwise how are you to rate your own progress and understanding? In concert with a course however and with a teacher to fill in any information gaps, I think this is a fine book! All the explanations seem clear, and the steps in the derivation processes are easy to follow!

  • Owning 3 Intro Quantum text books (I like to use various resources when studying), this book is by far the worst (not only Quantum, but physics in general) book I have ever read.

    The problems with this book is the author assumes the reader has either a prior knowledge of the subject matter or that the reader has a overly superior set of math skills, I dont know, I have pretty strong math skills and most of the time I have no clue how or why he does things. The text is written very math and equation oriented. There is little to no explanation as to why or what the author is trying to show, he just runs through the equations, section by section. He overly uses terms like "We know that" or "Its clear that" as a means of explanation, and the reader is stuck wondering why something is done.

    Moreover the subject matter is covered very quickly (compared to other books of this subject). He lays out the concept, manipulates the equation in a few brief steps, and leading to the final equation. Entire sections can be covered in a few sentences.

    Examples are far and few between. Some book that are written so math or equation oriented can get away with it by providing many and lengthy examples to do their explanations. This book does neither.

    Here I am in the middle of chapter TWELVE doing my homework and I am so upset with this book that I am taking the tome to write this. If you are looking for an easy to understand, medium paced, well explained, and full exampled text, you would be much better off with Griffiths.

    T

  • Pretty good, wish there was a bit more illustrations. We did not use it too extensively as it was a support reading, not the main text.

  • comprehensive tending toward wordy

  • Gasiorowicz is somewhat of a dry writer and doesn't exactly make the subject all that interesting. However, this edition is significantly better than the 3rd edition (which cuts out so much material). So far as the depth of the subject covered in this text, I would say it is more rigorous in the mathematics than Griffiths, less rigorous than Merzbacher, and on par with Liboff. If you are already familiar with quantum mechanics then it can be an excellent reference - and it's not bulky to carry around, unlike Liboff.

  • Well written. I enjoy how they use historical perspectives to bring the concepts to life.