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ePub Sail's Last Century: The Merchant Sailing Ship 1830-1930 (Conway's History of the Ship) download

by Basil Greenhill

ePub Sail's Last Century: The Merchant Sailing Ship 1830-1930 (Conway's History of the Ship) download
Author:
Basil Greenhill
ISBN13:
978-0851775654
ISBN:
0851775659
Language:
Publisher:
Chrysalis Books (1993)
Category:
Subcategory:
Technology
ePub file:
1208 kb
Fb2 file:
1804 kb
Other formats:
lrf azw docx mbr
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
729

This is one of the Conway's History of the Ship series and like all of them, consists of a set of essays by various historians rather than a continuous narrative

This is one of the Conway's History of the Ship series and like all of them, consists of a set of essays by various historians rather than a continuous narrative. After a helpful introduction, two chapters cover wooden sailing ships over and under 300 tons, then two chapters cover the transition to iron and steel sailing ships and a final chapter put all sailing ships in the nineteenth century under consideration.

Sail's Last Century book. This book charts the sailing ships course, the development of the schooner, and the sailing ship's transition from wood to iron and steel construction.

Items related to Sail's Last Century: The Merchant Sailing Ship. Category: Ships & the Sea; Britain/UK; 1990s; ISBN: 0851775659. Greenhill, Basil Sail's Last Century: The Merchant Sailing Ship 1830-1930 (Conway's History of the Ship). ISBN 13: 9780851775654. Sail's Last Century: The Merchant Sailing Ship 1830-1930 (Conway's History of the Ship). ISBN/EAN: 9780851775654.

Ann Gifford, Basil Greenhill. Archaeology of Boats and Ships (Conway's Merchant, Marine & Maritime History). The Schooner Bertha L. Downs (Conway's History of the Ship). Boats and Boatmen of Pakistan. Herzogin Cecilie: The Life and Times of a Four-Masted Barque (Conway's History of Sail).

An exemplary text enhanced by a many fine period photos, drawings & plans. Sail's Last Century: Merchant Sailing Ship, 1830-1930 (Conway's History of the Ship) by Basil Greenhill fb2 DOWNLOAD FREE.

by Robert Gardiner; Basil Greenhill; et al. Published by Conway Maritime Press. Nearly fine condition in a nearly fine dustwrapper. Conway's History Of The Ship series.

The maritime history of the United States is a broad theme within the history of the United States. As an academic subject, it crosses the boundaries of standard disciplines, focusing on understanding the United States' relationship with the oceans, seas, and major waterways of the globe. The focus is on merchant shipping, and the financing and manning of the ships. A merchant marine owned at home is not essential to an extensive foreign commerce

Shipbuilding Technology, Engineering & Trades. Imprint Conway Maritime Press Ltd. Publication City/Country London, United Kingdom.

Shipbuilding Technology, Engineering & Trades. Conway's History of the Ship. Illustrations note 220 photographs and line drawings. ISBN13 9780851775654. Categories: General & World History.

(Conway's History of the Ship) - A period that is commonly presented as a long, drawn out battle between sail and steam, this volume - the sixth in an ambitious series - sets out to prove that this was not the case and that shipowners, far from seeing the two types as irreconcilable rivals, invested in one or the other according to the usual commercial evaluation of potential risks and rewards.
  • This is one of the Conway's History of the Ship series and like all of them, consists of a set of essays by various historians rather than a continuous narrative. After a helpful introduction, two chapters cover wooden sailing ships over and under 300 tons, then two chapters cover the transition to iron and steel sailing ships and a final chapter put all sailing ships in the nineteenth century under consideration. Next there are chapters covering schooners in American and Britain, Baltic sailing ships and finally, an intriguing chapter on the changing problems of shiphandling in the nineteenth century. There is a very good annotated bibliography and a reasonably complete glossary at the end.

    So what does all this give you? First the various essayists cover the economics of shipbuilding and operation in considerable detail. Next they relate that to the technical and operational advantages of sailing ships vs. steam ships and wooden ships vs. iron and steel ships. There is also knowledgable discussion of the pros and cons of various sail rigs and their effect on operations. Ship stability and structure are explicitly explained and considered though, as would be expected by the work of historians, no quantitative analysis is offered.

    In some of the essays the level of detail might seem a bit overpowering for a general reader but can passed through without difficulty if needed. One thing apparent is the real affection and respect the various writers have for the ships being described and for the people who sailed them. The illustrations are quite numerous, of variable quality since contemperaneous, and well related to the text.

    I have no hesitation recomending this book for someone with an interest in nautical matters who wants to dig deeper and learn more.

  • As a reader of Great Lakes maritime history I see a lot of different ships mentioned in passing. Here is a book that will give you the technical details on those ships and what factors drove the particulars of their construction. Of couse this book is a study of seafaring worldwide, but much of this technology was in heavy use on the inland seas in the late nineteenth century. This makes this book a valuable addition to the maritime enthusiast's library.

  • Had all the information I needed and more.

  • Excellent book, something I've been looking for extensively throughout past three years. Wholeheartedly recommend. There is so little written about the big sailing merchant vessels from the last period of sailing anyways. Ample photographic material with contextualized explanations!

  • Great book!