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ePub Humankind: A Brief History download

by Felipe Fernández-Armesto

ePub Humankind: A Brief History download
Author:
Felipe Fernández-Armesto
ISBN13:
978-0192805751
ISBN:
0192805754
Language:
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; First Edition edition (May 17, 2004)
Subcategory:
Anthropology
ePub file:
1336 kb
Fb2 file:
1143 kb
Other formats:
mobi docx rtf lrf
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
189

Felipe Fernández-Armesto (born 1950) is a British historian and author of several popular works of history

Felipe Fernández-Armesto (born 1950) is a British historian and author of several popular works of history.

Humankind : a brief history. by. Fernández-Armesto, Felipe. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

In a book of breathtaking range, Felipe Fernandez-Armesto takes us on an enlightening journey through the history of humankind, a narrative tour de force that challenges our most fundamental belief-that we are, and have always been, human. Humankind confronts the problem from a historical perspective, showing how our current understanding of what it means to be human has been shaken by new discoveries from science and philosophy. The author shows how our concept of humankind has changed over time, tracing its faltering expansion to its present limits and arguing that these limits are neither.

Felipe Fernández-Armesto holds the Principe of Asturias chair of Spanish Civilization at Tufts University where he also directs the Pearson Prentice Hall Seminar Series in Global History

Felipe Fernández-Armesto holds the Principe of Asturias chair of Spanish Civilization at Tufts University where he also directs the Pearson Prentice Hall Seminar Series in Global History. Recent awards include a Premio Nacional de Investigación (Sociedad Geográfica Española) in 2003, a fellowship at the Netherlands Institute of Advanced Study in the Humanities and Social Sciences, and a Union Pacific Visiting Professorship at the University of Minnesota (1999-2000). He won the Caird Medal of the National Maritime Museum in 1995 and the John Carter Brown Medal in 1999.

Fernandez-Armesto also discusses the modern day resurgence and spread of Latin culture across America. He discusses the Latin base of the country's history with Tanzina Vega, New York Times National Correspondent, covering race and ethnicity. Автовоспроизведение Если функция включена, то следующий ролик начнет воспроизводиться автоматически.

Felipe Fernandez-Armesto is a master historian and storyteller

Felipe Fernandez-Armesto is a master historian and storyteller. Felipe Fernàndez-Armesto holds the Principe of Asturias chair of Spanish Civilization at Tufts University where he also directs the Pearson Prentice Hall Seminar Series in Global History. His books include Before Columbus; The Times Illustrated History of Europe; Columbus; Millennium: A History of the Last Thousand Years (the subject of a ten-part series on CNN); Civilizations: Culture, Ambition, and the Transformation of Nature; Near a Thousand Tables; The Americas; Humankind: A Brief History; Ideas That Changed the World; The Times Atlas of World Exploration; and The Times.

Felipe Fernández-Armesto. With extraordinary suddenness, in 1492 this long-standing pattern went into reverse. The aeons-old history of divergence virtually came to an end, and a new, convergent era of the history of the planet began. The world stumbled over the brink of an ecological revolution, and ever since, ecological exchanges have wiped out the most marked effects of 150 million years of evolutionary divergence.

great revolutions in the world history of food: the origins of cooking, which set humankind on a course apart from.

In Near a Thousand Tables, acclaimed food historian Felipe Fernández-Armesto tells the fascinating story of food as cultural as well as culinary history - a window on the history of mankind.

Felipe Fernandez-Armesto In this "appetizingly provocative" (Los Angeles Times) book, he guides readers.

Felipe Fernandez-Armesto. In Near a Thousand Tables, acclaimed food historian Felipe Fernández-Armesto tells the fascinating story of food as cultural as well as culinary history - a window on the history of mankind

The discovery that the DNA of chimpanzees and humans is incredibly similar, sharing 98% of the same code, suggests that there is very little different--or special--about the human animal. Likewise, advances in artificial intelligence mean that humans no longer have exclusive access to reason, consciousness and imagination. Indeed, the harder we cling to the concept of humanity, the more slippery it becomes. But if it breaks down altogether, what will this mean for human values, human rights, and the defense of human dignity? In a book of breathtaking range, Felipe Fernandez-Armesto takes us on an enlightening journey through the history of humankind, a narrative tour de force that challenges our most fundamental belief--that we are, and have always been, human. Humankind confronts the problem from a historical perspective, showing how our current understanding of what it means to be human has been shaken by new discoveries from science and philosophy. The author shows how our concept of humankind has changed over time, tracing its faltering expansion to its present limits and arguing that these limits are neither fixed or scientifically verifiable. Controversially, he proposes that we have further to go in developing our concept of humankind and that we need to rethink it as a matter of urgency. One of the most imaginative historians writing today, Felipe Fernandez-Armesto here combines astonishing breadth with passionate and exciting storytelling. For the intellectually curious, for those interested in history, philosophy, science and culture, and for anyone who has ever wondered about what makes us human, Humankind offers an exhilarating new perspective.
  • This book is not quite what I thought it was when I purchased it. The jacket art shows a variety of hominid forms as well as some futuristic machine forms, so I thought the book was a compact anthropology of the genus with, perhaps, some interesting speculation upon the future. What the book is instead is a philosophy in which Fernandez-Armesto cites his thesis that "humanity" as a concept can no longer be defined in unique terms: toolmaker, language user, culture creator--many species exhibit these traits, ergo, humanity is not so special after all.

    Well, I never thought humanity was so special, but I have always been able to recognize a human from other higher mammals. Matters of degree do not lend themselves easily to the need for hard edged truth, but matters of degree are what separate us from other higher mammals and futuristic machine intelligences, and matters of degree are enough.

    The book is worth a read once you understand what it is; Fernandez-Armesto cites many useful historical references. I would say, however, that there is one human trait he failed to explore, and that is evil. I have never observed deliberate evil in other animal forms, only humanity.

  • Humankind: A Brief History is not a world history rather it is Felipe Fernandez-Armesto's reflections on what it is to be human, where do we draw the boundary line between us and non-us?
    He looks at the boundaries between ourselves and other animals. If we grant rights to apes because they're so like us, do we then have to extend them to monkeys because they're so like apes and so on to Bertrand Russell's "votes for oysters"? He also looks at our ancestors to discuss where the line could be drawn there. As the work was written in 2003 and published in 2004 it predates the discoveries of Neanderthal and Denisovan admixtures in non-African humans, discoveries that I think would have strengthen his conclusions.
    Besides the biological he also considers the cultural, how 'wild men', 'wolf-children' and 'noble savages' were viewed by explorers and by intellectuals.
    Finally he considers post-human futures, how genetic engineering and/or robotics may influence what it means to be human.

  • This book deals with how mankind has tried to define humankind. Our we human because our body is different from other animals? But apes are so close to us when it comes to DNA. Because we have a soul or mind? Can we even prove those things exist? Because we have culture and works of art? But don't machines now write stories and don't chimps paint?
    Will we ever find something to define us as humans when we don't even know what being human means? I enjoyed this book and, funny enough as a manga fan, have to compare it to _Ghost In The Shell_ and _AppleSeed_ in the questions it asks.