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ePub The Lumbee Problem: The Making of an American Indian People (Cambridge Studies in Cultural Systems) download

by Karen I. Blu

ePub The Lumbee Problem: The Making of an American Indian People (Cambridge Studies in Cultural Systems) download
Author:
Karen I. Blu
ISBN13:
978-0521295420
ISBN:
0521295424
Language:
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press; First Paperback Edition edition (May 30, 1980)
Subcategory:
Anthropology
ePub file:
1125 kb
Fb2 file:
1512 kb
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
948

How does a group of people who have American Indian ancestry but no records of treaties, reservations.

How does a group of people who have American Indian ancestry but no records of treaties, reservations.

The Lumbee Problem book. The Lumbee Indians of North Carolina, although the fifth largest Indian group in the United States, have had a history of difficulty in convincing others of their Indian identity. The Lumbee Indians of North Carolina, although the fifth largest.

The Lumbee Problem: The Making of an American Indian People. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Brown, Joanna, ed. 1995. Critical Issues in American Indian Higher Education. Chicago: NAES College. Crum, Steven J. 1991. Colleges Before Columbus. Tribal College 3(2), 14–17. Deloria, Vine Jr. Indian Education in America.

Blu, Karen I. (1980). The Lumbee Problem: The Making of an Indian People. Evans, W. McKee (1979). The North Carolina Lumbees: From Assimilation to Revitalization. Athens: University of Georgia Press. Makofsky, Abraham (1980). Tradition and Change in the Lumbee Indian Community in Baltimore. Maryland Historical Magazine 75:55-71.

Karen I. Blu}, author {William Mckee Evans}, year {1981} }. William Mckee Evans.

The Lumbee Problem: The Making of an American Indian People. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1980 Urban Renegades: the Cultural Strategy of American Indians. Columbia University of Oklahoma Press; Norman, 1994. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1980. Calloway, Colin G. New Directions in American Indian History. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1991. Urban Renegades: the Cultural Strategy of American Indians. com – February 2012 Harring, Sidney L. Crow Dog’s Case: American Indian Sovereignty, Tribal Law, and United States, Law in the Nineteenth Century. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1994. Holm, Tom. Strong Hearts, Wounded Souls: Native American Veterans of the Vietnam War. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001. Bonilla-Silva, Eduardo. White supremacy and racism in the post-civil rights era. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2001. Personal conversation. Trans: Gender and Race in an Age of Unsettled Identities.

The Lumbee Problem: The Making of an American Indian People

The Lumbee Problem: The Making of an American Indian People. Drawing on a series of recent studies that examine the question from the perspective of the history of ideas, power, and institutions, the present article will focus on the process which led the Spanish Crown to attribute to the Indigenous people the status of personae miserabiles.

Blu argues that the political history of the Lumbee Indians was greatly affected by the relationships between.

The first reading was the preface and the fourth chapter from the book, The Lumbee Problem: The Making of an American Indian People, entitled, What are they trying to do now? In this reading, the author, Karen I. Blu, examines the political history of the Indians of Robeson County, North Carolina and goes into detail about her findings during her visit there between 1967 and 1968. Blu argues that the political history of the Lumbee Indians was greatly affected by the relationships between them and non-Indians as well as each other’s perceptions of one another.

Lumbee Indians are a tribe of nonreservation1 state-recognized Native Americans in Southeastern North Carolina. Karen I. Blu, The Lumbee Problem: The Making of an American Indian People (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001);Google Scholar. They are a unique indigenous people as evidenced by their unusual history and cultural origins. The Lumbee have historically lived in southeastern North Carolina, and their territory covered a large region, now known as Robeson, Hoke, Cumberland, and Scotland counties.

The Lumbee Indians of North Carolina, although the fifth largest Indian group in the United States, have had a history of difficulty in convincing others of their Indian identity. Like other 'neglected' Eastern Indian groups, they lack treaties, reservations and a continuous record of settlement, and apparently have not practised 'traditional Indian ways' for over two hundred years. This raises questions of how their distinctiveness is formulated and maintained. Using material derived from fieldwork among the Lumbee, Professor Blu argues that deeply-felt notions about their group identity have played a major role in shaping and guiding their political activities for over a century. She traces the changing relationships of the Lumbee with their black and white neighbours in this period. In carving out a third niche for themselves in a biracial system, the Lumbee have demonstrated that the Southern racial structure has been more flexible and complicated than has often been suggested.