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ePub The Complete Works of Zhuangzi (Translations from the Asian Classics) download

by Burton Watson

ePub The Complete Works of Zhuangzi (Translations from the Asian Classics) download
Author:
Burton Watson
ISBN13:
978-0231164740
ISBN:
0231164742
Language:
Publisher:
Columbia University Press (December 3, 2013)
Subcategory:
Philosophy
ePub file:
1317 kb
Fb2 file:
1241 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
389

ASIAN AFFAIRS) But one is well advised to persevere through the entire work and to read the full translations in tandem (all three, if one has mastery of English and German - but at least.

from the hand of Burton Watson is an event to be welcomed with gratitude. journal of asian studies). But one is well advised to persevere through the entire work and to read the full translations in tandem (all three, if one has mastery of English and German - but at least read together the Watson and Mair translations). Watson and Mair translate with clarity, simplicity and project the dear humanity, cheer and humor of Chuang-tzu.

Translation of any of the classics. from the hand of Burton Watson is an event to be welcomed with gratitude. Chuang-tzu is an inexhaustable resource. One should advert to the entire work of Chuang-tzu repeatedly and often to clarify one's own reasoning process

Translation of any of the classics. Burton Watson has taught at Columbia, Stanford, and Kyoto Universities and is one of the world's best-known translators of Chinese and Japanese works. One should advert to the entire work of Chuang-tzu repeatedly and often to clarify one's own reasoning process. Often one sticks to the "Inner Chapters". The more so that there is much dispute about additions and insertions, or even authenticity, in the Middle and Outer Chapters.

Zhuangzi --. The complete wo r k s o f z h ua n g z I --. translated by. Burton Watson. A certain number of anecdotes concerning Zhuangzi appear in the book that bears his name, though it is difficult, in view of the deliberate fantasy that characterizes the book as a whole, to regard these as reliable biography.

Only by inhabiting Dao (the Way of Nature) and dwelling in its unity can humankind achieve true happiness and freedom, in both life and death. This is Daoist philosophy's central tenet, espoused by the person-or group of people-known as Zhuangzi (369?-286? . in a text by the same name. To be free, individuals must discard rigid distinctions between good and bad, right and wrong, and follow a course of action not motivated by gain or striving.

Start by marking The Complete Works of Zhuangzi (Translations from the Asian Classics) as Want to Read .

Start by marking The Complete Works of Zhuangzi (Translations from the Asian Classics) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Zhuangzi elucidates this mystical philosophy through humor, parable, and anecdote, deploying non sequitur and even nonsense to illuminate a truth beyond the boundaries of ordinary logic. Boldly imaginative and inventively worded, the Zhuangzi floats free of its historical period and society, addressing the spiritual nourishment of all people across time.

Burton Watson has taught at Columbia, Stanford, and Kyoto Universities and is one of the world's best-known translators of Chinese and Japanese works

Burton Watson has taught at Columbia, Stanford, and Kyoto Universities and is one of the world's best-known translators of Chinese and Japanese works. His translations include The Demon at Agi Bridge and Other Japanese Tales, The Analects of Confucius, The Tales of the Heike, and The Lotus Sutra; the writings of Zhuangzi, Mozi, Xunzi, and Han Feizi; The Columbia Book of Chinese Poetry; and Records of the Grand Historian.

English] The Complete works of Zhuangzi, translated by Burton Watson. This book is printed on paper with recycled content

English] The Complete works of Zhuangzi, translated by Burton Watson. p. c. (Translations from the Asian classics) Columbia University Press first published Watson’s translation as The Complete Works of Chuang Tzu in 1968. Includes bibliographical references and index. This book is printed on paper with recycled content.

ASIAN AFFAIRS Translation of any of the classics. JOURNAL OF ASIAN STUDIES show more.

series Translations from the Asian Classics. Books related to The Complete Works of Zhuangzi.

Only by inhabiting Dao (the Way of Nature) and dwelling in its unity can humankind achieve true happiness and freedom, in both life and death. This is Daoist philosophy's central tenet, espoused by the person―or group of people―known as Zhuangzi (369?-286? B.C.E.) in a text by the same name. To be free, individuals must discard rigid distinctions between good and bad, right and wrong, and follow a course of action not motivated by gain or striving. When one ceases to judge events as good or bad, man-made suffering disappears and natural suffering is embraced as part of life.Zhuangzi elucidates this mystical philosophy through humor, parable, and anecdote, deploying non sequitur and even nonsense to illuminate a truth beyond the boundaries of ordinary logic. Boldly imaginative and inventively worded, the Zhuangzi floats free of its historical period and society, addressing the spiritual nourishment of all people across time. One of the most justly celebrated texts of the Chinese tradition, the Zhuangzi is read by thousands of English-language scholars each year, yet only in the Wade-Giles romanization. Burton Watson's pinyin romanization brings the text in line with how Chinese scholars, and an increasing number of other scholars, read it.
  • Chuang-tzu's butterfly dream anticipated by 2000 years the argument that Descartes reasoned through in reaching his Dictum, "Cogito ergo sum".

    Along with the Baghavad-Gita as well as the Brihadaranyaka and Chandogya Upanishads (Paul Deussen's magisterial German translations), and together with Dostoevsky's entire work, the Chuang-tzu corpus forms the very philosophic framework for a spiritual, intellectual Way.

    This review is of the translation (Kindle) by Burton Watson of Columbia University (hardbound ISBN 978-0-231-03147-9).

    Unless one can read the original, ancient bamboo manuscripts (as can one of my own dear friends -- who has a classical education from a major Taiwanese university), one should rely on both the translation of Columbia University's Burton Watson and that of the magisterial Victor H. Mair (University of Pennsylvania), entitled, "Wandering the Way: Early Taoist Tales and Parables of Chuang-tzu" (ISBN: 978-0-8248-2038-1).

    Both Burton Watson and Victor H. Mair do a masterful job of rendering the entire remaining corpus of Chuang-zu. One gains the better insight by reading the entire corpus fully through with Watson or Mair, followed in tandem by reading the other clear through.

    If one has mastery of German, I would highly recommend adding a third reading to the tandem, namely, the classical translation from the early Sinologist, Richard Wilhelm, "Dschuang Dsi: Das wahre Buch vom südlichen Blütenland" (Anaconda Verlag GmbH Köln, ISBN 978-3-86647-597-7).

    There is no newer good German translation. In Germany, one relies upon the translation of Wilhelm accompanied by a German translation of the edition of Victor H. Mair, which underscores Mair's international reputation.

    Chuang-tzu is an inexhaustable resource. One should advert to the entire work of Chuang-tzu repeatedly and often to clarify one's own reasoning process.

    Often one sticks to the "Inner Chapters". The more so that there is much dispute about additions and insertions, or even authenticity, in the Middle and Outer Chapters. If one skips the Middle and Outer Chapters, one misses some of the classic tales, parables and insights of the Chuang-tzu corpus. But there is no denying the uniqueness of the Inner Chapters, and they deserve their special status.

    The Inner Chapters begin with the mystery of the K'un and the P'eng and humorosly compares the Great bird's majestic flight with the self-satisfied hops of the cicada and the dovelet. That parable-- well to be pondered-- sets the tone for what comes.

    But one is well advised to persevere through the entire work and to read the full translations in tandem (all three, if one has mastery of English and German -- but at least read together the Watson and Mair translations).

    Watson and Mair translate with clarity, simplicity and project the dear humanity, cheer and humor of Chuang-tzu.

    The closest Western analogues that occur to me are the works of Epictetus and the Parmenides Dialogue of Plato.

    The sum of it is that Chuang-tzu is truly in the world's classical, philosophical canon, and the reader is very well served by Watson and Mair.

  • An excellent reading for mind and brain.
    Good translation.
    Easy to read.

  • Excellent

  • Bought this for a gift.

  • Zhuangzi is one of the deepest, most relevant, most playful, and all around best philosophers who ever lived. He deserves a place in everyone's library, and this is the translation of Zhuangzi that conveys his words with the least interpolation (technically, these are unattributed words circulated by an unknown Taoist community he founded, but why nitpick?). There are a few errors here and there but there is no attempt to shove the wonderful stories of the original into European philosophical categories. Best of all, Watson conveys Zhuangzi the way the Chinese understand him, and lets us know when he has used Chinese commentary to figure out confusing parts of the text.

    It is worth noting that this was originally published in 1968, and most of the translations published after then are based in part on this one.

  • This would've been such a slamdunk 5 stars. But unfortunately, this was written by more than one guy under the name "Zhuangzi." One's a really smart, brilliant cookie. The other is a dull partypooper.

    I really like Zhuangzi --he's a thoughtful, funny, frustrating, and anarchic old guy who's just tired of everyday BS. He tells confusing, entertaining nonsense stories and leaves it to the reader to figure out what the hell he's talking about. Some of my favorite stories:

    * Zhuangzi uses a skull for a pillow. He talks to the skull in his dreams and asks the skull if it wants to come back to life and see his family and friends again. The skulls says to buzz off.

    * A doctor brags to Zhuangzi about how he serves the king and has hundreds of carriages. Zhuangzi says of course the king gave the doctor hundreds of carriages -- he must have been licking the king's hemorrhoids.

    * A cripple laughs at his condition. Who knows what new shapes his body will take? Maybe his hand will become a crossbow. Maybe his butt will become cartwheels and he can hook himself up to a horse!

    * Two kings visiting a formless blob want to do something nice for their blob friend. They notice he doesn't have eyes, ears, nostrils, or a mouth. So they drill a new hole into him each day. On the seventh day, the blob dies. The end.

    But the other "Zhuangzi" is a boring, dry fart of a commentator. Bloated and long-winded, their biggest sin is they try to make SENSE of the good Zhuangzi. It's like if right after Jesus told the parable of the Prodigal Son, St. Peter bellies up to the podium and explains God will love you even if you're a dick. Like frogs, parables are a lot less fun when they're dissected.

    So honestly, if you want to read Zhuangzi, read Watson's Basic Writings of Zhuangzi, which snips out the weaker parts. Either way, for something over two thousand years old, it sure feels evergreen. The subversive power of Zhuangzi's stories is they're so innocuously silly that they'll slip right underneath some people's noses, but even a kid can understand the importance of a dude's buttcheeks becoming cartwheels.

  • This book, the Zhuangzi, is the most profound book I have ever read in my life. If you like philosophy, then you should read this book as a capstone after reading a bunch of other philosophers. It addresses the deepest questions in philosophy, for both theoretical reason and practical reason. And it's funny. It's incredible. It's the kind of book that will leave you seeing things in a tangibly different way after you set it down and walk around outside.

  • Watson translated the book well, keeping the diction and style as close to the original as possible. The only concern is that I received my book with stains on the cover, and the price is exceedingly hefty.