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ePub The Republic: The Influential Classic download

by Tom Butler-Bowdon,Plato

ePub The Republic: The Influential Classic download
Author:
Tom Butler-Bowdon,Plato
ISBN13:
978-0857083135
ISBN:
0857083139
Language:
Publisher:
Capstone; 1 edition (May 14, 2012)
Subcategory:
Philosophy
ePub file:
1459 kb
Fb2 file:
1214 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
850

Tom Butler-Bowdon is the author of five bestselling books on classic self-help and motivational writing. He has been described by USA Today as ?a true scholar of this type of literature?.

Tom Butler-Bowdon is the author of five bestselling books on classic self-help and motivational writing. Customers who viewed this item also viewed. Page 1 of 1 Start overPage 1 of 1. He has been described by USA Today as a true scholar of this type of literature.

Introduction to The Republic: The Influential Classic, Plato. London: Capstone (Wiley). ISBN 978-0-85708-313-5.

Now Plato's best known work, one of the most intellectually and historically influential works of philosophy and political .

Подписчиков: 1 ты. себе: The most powerful ideas from the world's.

then you could do worse than listening to the great philosophers Plato and Machiavelli. Niccolo Machiavelli, Tom Butler-Bowdon, Plato. Management & Business: General.

item 1 Influential Classics Collection: The Republic and The by Plato New Hardback Book -Influential Classics Collection: The Republic and The by Plato New Hardback Book. If you are looking for guidance to help navigate the pitfalls of your professional and personal life then you could do worse than listening to the great philosophers Plato and Machiavelli.

Plato, Tom Butler-Bowdon. The volumes of international bestsellers such as Think and Grow Rich and The Art of War have quickly become the market leaders.

The Influential Classic. With an Introduction by TOM BUTLER-BOWDON. He has been described by USA Today as ‘a true scholar of this type of literature’. ▲. Have a question about this product? Ask us here. Find Related Products.

In The Republic Plato takes you back to ancient Greece and his plans for a perfect society that is characterised by a blend of wisdom, courage, self-discipline and justice, and . Place of Publication.

In The Republic Plato takes you back to ancient Greece and his plans for a perfect society that is characterised by a blend of wisdom, courage, self-discipline and justice, and the importance of living according to eternal truths rather than simply for survival and pleasure. In The Prince Machiavelli draws from his personal experience in Renaissance-era Florence to provide leadership advice which touches on the very modern issues of time management, presentations, change management and interview skills and was controversial in its ruthless call for fearless and effective action.

The newest deluxe edition in the bestselling Capstone Classics Series

This ancient classic has had a make-over. In recent years these Capstone Classic deluxe editions have caught the book buying public's imagination. The volumes of international bestsellers such as Think and Grow Rich and The Art of War have quickly become the market leaders. Now Plato's best known work, one of the most intellectually and historically influential works of philosophy and political theory, has been brought to life in this luxury, hardback, keep-sake edition.

This edition includes:

Plato's plans for a perfect society characterised by a blend of wisdom, courage, self-discipline and justice Lessons to learn about living according to eternal truths, instead of existing simply for survival and pleasure A new introduction by Tom Butler Bowdon, the classic personal development expert
  • I'm trying to alternate between fun audiobooks and ones that I feel I should read rather than having any desire to do so. Plato's Republic was in that second group. I honestly expected to hate it. But it's one of the fundamental classics. So on the list it goes to listen to while I commute. And I loved it. It may have been that it was a full cast audio but it honestly did feel like being with a group. Maybe a quarter of the way in I realized what it reminded me of: when you are at a very mellow party in college and people start discussing things that are really "deep, man." And there's that one person who is way too into it and dominates the conversation. So that tickled me most of the book. The other thing that was really engaging was how much of the ideas in this book can be seen in the modern world. In that way it made it feel like an anthropological study and it kept making me say, "neat," even when I disagreed with whatever point was being made. Overall I would recommend this audiobook version because it made it come alive.

  • Whew, that was an intense read! I gave five stars because after careful consideration I realized that Alan Blooms interpretive essay really helped me to understand the The Republic to a different degree. The first ten books are the shoes, the interpretive essay is the shoe lace and it ties all of it up very neatly. To read something over 2,000 years old that’s been translated from Ancient Greek is a task in itself, I commend this translations interpreter he did a stellar job. This book is Heavy and not a book you can just pick up and expect to read in a weekend, its not littered with images that create a perfect picture for you to burn thru, it’s page after page after page of thought, so it slows you down, a lot. Each page forces you to think about what you’re reading, sometimes you have ZERO Idea and that’s ok, that’s where Bloom’s Interpretive Essay comes in. To pick up this book and commit to finishing it is a Challenge I highly recommend, you’ll walk away a better person with a sense of accomplishment and more thoughtful mind. I’ve read over 200 books and I think it’s safe to say that this was the most challenging book I’ve ever put my mind too, if your looking for a challenge then you’ve found it. Happy reading ????

  • Plato’s Republic (Greek: Πολιτεία, Politeia; Latin: Res Publica) was written in 380 BC and this version was translated by Benjamin Jowett in 1871. It is a fiction book in the format of a discussion between Socrates and others. It aims to debate and conclusively determine the meaning of Justice. Socrates, the main character, was a Greek philosopher and the mentor of Plato. His philosophy is the basis and origin of the western philosophy. As a high schooler who often debates similar ideals and questions, I found this book to be very eye-opening and fascinating. Socrates doctrine proves itself true even in this day in age. That just goes to show, when it comes to ideals and behavior, humans haven’t changed very much. Republic is very well written and even after thousands of years it still captures its audience with its provoking revelations and relatable content. If you often find yourself debating similar questions then you might just find your answers here, but if you dislike philosophy or are set in your ways you probably will not find this book to be interesting. For me, this book was an enjoyable challenge and I definitely would read it again.

  • While the book was written in 380 BCE it is, perhaps, more relevant today than at any time in its history. You would almost think that Plato had pulled a Dr. Who and transported himself to 2018 before sitting down to write. It couldn’t be more tailored to the political, social, and economic environment in which we currently find ourselves.

    Plato/Socrates use elenctic (i.e. Socratic) questioning to explore human happiness and the specific virtue of justice. Socrates believed: “by curing people of the hubris of thinking they know when they do not…makes them happier and more virtuous than anything else.”

    Socrates and his friends pursue this journey by defining the ideal city – Kallipolis—and its rulers and constitution, the idea being that truth is often easier to discern on a large scale (i.e. a city) that can then be applied on a smaller scale (i.e. the individual).

    The debate focuses on the four virtues of an ideal city—wisdom, courage, temperance, and justice. And results in the conclusion that the human soul is made up of three parts—the appetitive, spirited, and rational—and that virtue, ultimately proven to be the source of happiness exists when the three are in balance and harmony.

    Socrates ultimately defines five political/economic models—philosopher/king, timocracy, oligopoly, democracy, and tyranny. And he ranks them, from good to bad, in the order listed, essentially arguing that they form an inverse ladder in which one inevitably deteriorates into the latter.

    That means, in essence, that oligopoly inevitably deteriorates into democracy, which he clearly doesn’t not hold in very high esteem. Freedom, by his logic, is unsustainable. In the simplest terms, the unfettered pursuit of freedom by everyone ultimately leads to conflict and that, in turn, inevitably leads to a race for power defined by manipulation, deception, and injustice.

    As a result, democracy inevitably leads to tyranny as the ruling class preys—quite deceitfully—on the fears of the masses that they, the masses, are being sidelined and their interests ignored. Sound familiar?

    The elenctic, commonly known as the Socratic method, has been largely stripped from our political and academic discourse. People are sure of what they know and don’t want to know anything else. The thirst for victory has, as a result, crushed the thirst for knowledge.

    There are many reasons for this. Technology, which gave rise to the echo chamber, has certainly contributed. Impatience has also played a big role. Elenctic takes time and our collective attention spans have dwindled to near nothing. Education, I believe Plato would say, however, is probably the real culprit. Oppression, sheltering, and victimization have replaced Plato’s definition of the ideal education: physical training, musical training (including prose and speech), mathematics, and dialectic.

    On the surface, critics will find no shortage of targets in the logic. More than anything else, however, both the argument and any criticism that might be drawn, reflect the imprecision of language itself and the difficultly this presents for philosophers willing to tackle the biggest and most relevant issues of life.

    That, however, simply reinforces Plato’s encouragement to ask more questions, listen more attentively with an open mind, and never assume you know the real answer. Which is why his ultimate encouragement it seems to me is not to admire things that are beautiful or just, but to truly understand what beauty and justice are. Sadly, I can think of no leader today who is doing anything even remotely close to that.

    Read it. It will make you a better leader, citizen, parent, friend, and person.