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by Carey R. Carlson

ePub The Mind-Body Problem and Its Solution download
Author:
Carey R. Carlson
ISBN13:
978-0929636351
ISBN:
092963635X
Language:
Publisher:
Syren Book Company (February 28, 2005)
Subcategory:
Philosophy
ePub file:
1950 kb
Fb2 file:
1231 kb
Other formats:
mobi lrf azw mbr
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
795

The mind-body problem demands a description of how the mental and physical parts of the world go together to make up the whole. The problem was solved around 1927 by Bertrand Russell and Alfred North Whitehead

The mind-body problem demands a description of how the mental and physical parts of the world go together to make up the whole. The problem was solved around 1927 by Bertrand Russell and Alfred North Whitehead. Since I think Russell's stance on the mind-body problem is superior to the traditional options of dualism and materialism and also think Whitehead's speculative process metaphysics was far ahead of its time, I was excited to see this passage and curious as to how well Carlson would back it up over the course of a short book.

In this book, author Carey Carlson performs two valuable tasks. First, he lays out the mind-body problem in crystalline common-sense prose. Second, he proposes an intriguing solution based on the work of ury philosophers Bertrand Russell and Alfred North Whitehead. This book will be of interest both to general readers of science and philosophy and to those steeped in the literature. Second, he proposes an intriguing solution based on the work of early twentieth-century philosophers Bertrand Russell and Alfred North Whitehead.

Items related to The Mind-Body Problem and Its Solution. In this book, author Carey Carlson performs two valuable tasks. Carey R. Carlson The Mind-Body Problem and Its Solution. ISBN 13: 9780929636351. The Mind-Body Problem and Its Solution.

The mind–body problem is a debate concerning the relationship between thought and consciousness in the human mind, and the brain as part of the physical body. This question arises when mind and body are considered as distinct, based on the premise that the mind and the body are fundamentally different in nature.

Book Overview This divide is called the mind-body problem, and it is centuries old. In this book, author Carey Carlson.

Over the last century scientists have made tremendous strides in understanding the physical nature of the universe and the biochemical nature of life. Yet the most salient feature of individual lives-our day-to-day consciousness and experience of the world, or sentience-remains stubbornly immune to scientific explanation.

The mind–body problem is a philosophical problem concerning the .

The mind–body problem is a philosophical problem concerning the relationship between the human mind and body, although it can also concern animal minds, if any, and animal bodies  . Clearly, a good deal rides on a satisfactory solution to the problem of mental causation there is more than one way in which puzzles about the mind's "causal relevance" to behavior (and to the physical world more generally) can arise.

I just spent a week at a symposium on the mind-body problem, the deepest of all mysteries

I just spent a week at a symposium on the mind-body problem, the deepest of all mysteries. The mind-body problem-which encompasses consciousness, free will and the meaning of life-concerns who we really are. Are we matter, which just happens to give rise to mind? Or could mind be the basis of reality, as many sages have insisted? The week-long powwow, called Physics, Experience and Metaphysics, took place at Esalen Institute, the legendary retreat center in Big Sur, California

A formal system is constructed which generates a finite set of statements that correlate 1-to-1 with the facts of a finite domain.

A formal system is constructed which generates a finite set of statements that correlate 1-to-1 with the facts of a finite domain.

Over the last century scientists have made tremendous strides in understanding the physical nature of the universe and the biochemical nature of life. Yet the most salient feature of individual lives--our day-to-day consciousness and experience of the world, or "sentience"--remains stubbornly immune to scientific explanation. This divide is called the "mind-body problem," and it is centuries old. In this book, author Carey Carlson performs two valuable tasks. First, he lays out the mind-body problem in crystalline common-sense prose. Second, he proposes an intriguing solution based on the work of early-twentieth-century philosophers Bertrand Russell and Alfred North Whitehead. This book will be of interest both to general readers of science and philosophy and to those steeped in the literature.
  • I was struck by these opening lines in the preface to this book:

    "The mind-body problem demands a description of how the mental and physical parts of the world go together to make up the whole. The problem was solved around 1927 by Bertrand Russell and Alfred North Whitehead."

    Since I think Russell's stance on the mind-body problem is superior to the traditional options of dualism and materialism and also think Whitehead's speculative process metaphysics was far ahead of its time, I was excited to see this passage and curious as to how well Carlson would back it up over the course of a short book. After reading the book I can say I think he did an excellent job in showing how the ideas from these thinkers can be put together into a compelling argument for a more coherent view of the world: that of a causal network of events which share a character which naturally underpins what we characterize as the mental and physical.

    Both Russell and Whitehead explained why you cannot identify the world with our mathematical descriptions of it: you leave out the intrinsic qualitative character of the world we know via experience. Both philosophers showed, in somewhat different ways, that what we think of as mental events and physical events can both fit into a picture of a causal network, whereas our usual intuition of the world as a spatial container holding static objects or substance won't work - whether one posits one kind of object or two.

    Carlson's outstanding contribution is to carefully describe what this ontology of causal relations can do: it can describe space-time and all that's in it while also accommodating mental events. He then shows how scientific theory really is an elucidation of a causal web and how it must actually fit into our network of experiences in order to be formulated. This leads to the final postulate that all nature has a sentient character, and that this best explains how mind and world are unified. While I was already sold on this idea, I think Carlson's book may convince other readers of the merits of a panexperientialist solution to the mind-body problem inspired by sound philosophy of science.

    All in all, this book does credit to its ambitious title. Along the way, it is also a fine exposition of some of the work of two of our greatest twentieth century thinkers.

  • I found my solution to the mind-body problem in 1973. I was unable to communicate to others what I had learned, and so I did not write my expected thesis at that time. I was ready 30 years later. I think that the intervening 30 years, in which I had time to percolate the ideas and live by them, made it a better book. In writing this book, I resorted to arrow diagrams to depict Russell and Whitehead's simplified view of Special Relativity (simplified by reducing space-time to sheer temporal succession.) I noticed that relative frequency ratios were formed in such diagrams-- diagrams which depict nothing but temporal succession patterns. Time can make frequency ratios all by itself, and these are identifiable as energy ratios, by virtue of Planck's E=hf. In hindsight, this was the key finding that led to the complete reconstruction of physics from temporal succession alone. This development fulfills Whitehead's guiding intuition as to mind and its place in nature. So you can read this book with greater confidence, knowing that technical implications of its central premises have produced arrow diagrams of the quantum structure of matter. To me, if physics is solved, I don't have to think about it as much. The prize is the confirmation of Whitehead's basic view of Nature: momentary occasions of experience engaged in a web of temporal/causal succession. This is a complete reduction of matter to mind, since matter is reduced to patterns of temporal succession. All this comes out more patiently in the course of the book. Some people don't like to read their own work, but I've thrilled to it quite a few times, and I wouldn't change a thing.

  • Exceeded my expectations.--Thank you.--Dr. Fletcher

  • This is a fascinating book in which esoteric material is presented with clarity and even humor. If I had read this book when I was a Philosophy major in college, I would not have dropped Philosophy as a major. It's that good."

    --Jim Thompson, College Philosophy Dropout